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April 18, i863 



Mr 



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Dear Mr. 



I have received your letter of April 10th and want 
you to know how much I appreciate your comments concerning 
"Masters of Deceit. lf 




Your interest in my book is indeed encouraging, . 
but I do not believe it would be appropriate for me to suggest 
distribution in the manner you outlined. You may be interested 
m knowing, however, that numerous newspapers did carry it in 
serial form. 

It is important that our citizens, particularly the 
yougg people who will be our Nation's leaders in the future, 
thoroughly understand the true nature of communism. This belief 
prompted the writing of "Masters of Deceit" and also my new bopJ$, 
"A Study of Communism, " which traces the history of iti& evil °% 
philosophy since its inception and contrasts it with our <£mericaflE= 
her itage of freedom. The latter book is designed not on$ for the/ 
oral reader but also as a textbook for students. Copfgs should 
available in your local library, < °*' 

It is a pleasure to send you, under separate covers 
some literature I hope, will be of interest. » =» 

Sincerely yours, 

1 T1 New Yqrke-kEn$osure ** Ed S ar * Hoovec 

i - Mr. | I- Enclosure (Sent DirectXiLoom;;4724 

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:€omitfuni^fc ^ Iliiisiori/ahd Democratic Reality 
An*Amerlc&nls Challenge 
Why Reds make friends with Businessmen 
Shall It Be taw or Tyranny? 
One. Nation* s Response To Communism 



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White Plains, flew Y< 
April 10, 1963 




Mr. Tet 

Mn/felmopi 

Mr/ 

Mr, 

Mr, Calla&a 

Mr, Conrad 

Mri 

MifMSvans 

Mr. Gale 

Mr. Ror.cn 

Mr, SulHva 

Mr. Tavcl 



Mr. Trotter. 

Tele. Room 

Miss Holmes 
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Mr. E; J. .Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau , o£ Investigation' * 
United States department of Justice 
Washington,. D. C. 

.*» ■ -*■ > < . > ■ . *. 

Dear Mrl Hoover: 



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I recently had the pleasure of* reading your book "Masters 
of Deceit" ,a n& en'joyed the truthful unveiling of the CoiMunis't menaced 
The impression made is a lasting one and. I -want to th&nk you for- the 
authentic knowledge you have given *ne. 





However, as you have explained, because this plague w&$jl 
he with us until we, win, the sooner all of our present and future^Sdults ;] 
are alerted, the more secure our nation shall, he. *4% ^ ^ 

GO XO 

To accelerate our victory I feel the entirety of your bookjj 
should he published in serial form iri all the daily and Sunday %tf|- 
papers throughout our nation and in those foreign countries wher^these 
«sc papers are issued. Also, would suggest copies of the hook he m^f^avail- 
<£ able' -free to all present and, future students upon entering junior hi£h . 
^?;school class or the equivalent. 2Jo cover the expenses involved I TSiild 
like; to submit this plan to toy Congressional representatives for rje'pog- 
laitidri »,and support, by tfife, federal Government and if not successful,, then 
canvass^for the needed contributions. 



;- ^ However,, m^ first considemtion is to inform you what /is 

conteni£0Lated; and if" it is acceptable/*^ you. I do not want to proceed 
further without your knowledge ah^^dncurrence . >- " * ^J *r^/7ric^^ 

Again, *I want to express my sincere appreciation fos&gm * 
admirable presentation of the facts which aE, mature arid* sane cr^lz^HS - * - * 
have welcomed, wanted and need. W-j' *3 ~ a^ 

* ' " HECEMEp k 8 t «0 - a APR 



Yours, ,yery truly) 



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April 24, 1963 





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Dear Mr. 



Thank you for your letter of April 18th relative 
to my book, "Masters of Deceit, <• Your generous comments 
concerning this book are most encouraging and I appreciate 
your thou^htf ulness In, writing. 

Enclosed is some literature I trust you will 
find to be of interest. You may : also wish to read my most 
recent book, "A Study of Communism, " which is a compre- 
hensive study of the deyelbpnient and expansion of communism 
throughout the world. It-should be available at your local 
library. 



MAILED tO. 



Sincerely yours, 

tk Edgar Hopver 



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Tolson _ 
Belmont > 

Mohr 2 

Casper -. 
CallahW , 
Conrad*^ 
DeLoach '. 
Evans — 



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R&sen,. 
Sullivan . 
Tavel' _ 



Enclosures (5) 

An American's Challenge -10-9-62 
Communism and The.Knowledge to Combat It! 
Let's. Fight Communism Sanely 1 

You Versus Crime , u«A V5' 

The Current Communist threat, ^*»u *; , 

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AprilWUJ, 1963 
315 S^West St. 
Angola, Indian 



Dear Mr, Hoover 



I am writing to you in order to tell < ymi how much I 

younderfiil bookhwasters of Deceit. 



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enjoyed reading your' wc 

It is truely a masterpiece of what I term "Americanism 
,VSi Communism. " I have recpmended the book to all of 
my friends and I 'recently gave a copy of it to my girl. It 
is my opinion that it should be compiilsafy reading in 
every high school in the nation. It is also my fiirm con- 
viction that if any teacher refuses to allow it in his class 
room he should be dismissed. Again, congradulatiohs on 
a masterpiece! 

Yours truly 




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Dear Miss 



April 24, 1963 


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I have received your letter of April 20th and 
appreciate your kind comment concerning M Mastefs of Deceit." 

. It is encouraging to know of your interest in 
learning more about the communist menace. The way to defeat " 
communism is- through knowledge, education, and reliance on our -'" 
democratic form of government. It is important that our citizens : 
understand the true nature of this cLvil philosophy in order, that 
'they will beabie to resisUts er^in^'irifiuehce. ,". ; ' 'I " - 

In- response ,to your request,, it is a pleasure to - 
send you some niaterial I hope will'be of assistance. Perhaps 
ypii wilicalspwant to read my hew book, "AStudy of Communism," 
which :tfaces\the histdry ' otthis* subversive conspiracy since "its- - 
inception and: contrasts cpnamunism with4ur own 'heritage of 
freedom. Copies should be available at your local public library. 
Your library may also assist you in obtaining « copy of ine "Daily 
Worker." > 




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•MAILED #> "« 



Sincerely yours, 
0. Edgar Hoover 



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Enclosures (5). ' bli ^ 1 '/ T J» 

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Enclosures 

.The Current Communist Threat 

Time of Testing 

Ypung j»eopte Can Help Defeat Communism 

Communisms-Slavery of Mind and Spirit 

One Nation's-Response to-Commuiiism 

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April 20, 1963 



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I Mr. Mohr^ 
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Tele. Boon, 



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Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
Dear Mr. Hoover: 



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Piece of literature" 7 ^ ^ and Ve ^y informative 

speechT^gx? veTin'mv^^ FT"* ° n «*■»*» ^r a 
like to know 5 « Souxd Mt'SFi?^;^ * nd ' X *»**3 
, any possible sourdes for informatioriS^ 16 f °* y ° U *° 5end * e ^ 
especially interested in howTcoSS ™ c ? muni ?*' * am 
Daily Wor ker- the «»»»«»««+ - obtain an issue of the 

'that you could give me! ' * W ° Uld ^P rec iate all .the help 
Shank you very much for your time and effort. 

Sincerely yours 





Miss 

Rural Route 2 
Hopkinton, Iowa 






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Bynum, Alabama 

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-■-..-: I have received thelettef ,of April, 28th from ,your wife ^ 
and youTand want you tpknpw,how much! appreciate your comments 
concerning. "Masters of deceit." Thank you, also, for your kind *■ 
remarks regarding our work and for the sentiments ,ybd expressed^ 
My associates and I hope our endeavors will continue to merit such 
approbation. „, % „•" . - % - ^ - r'* 



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It is important that our citizens "educate thi§mselves^ 
concerning the true nature of communism in order that they will bej" 
able to resist its eroding influence. At: the same time,, opposition 
tpcominunism must; be jcarefui artd constructive, and kept within/ /. 
the due process of law*. It is not enough, to merely be against . .*{ | 
Communism. We must exhibit, in positive way& the super ibrity of i ^ 
our form of government over any ioreigniiebiogy. \ \* 

A* 

Enclosed is some literature I hope will be of interest 
to you. Perhaps you will aiso r want to read my new bpok^ "A Study * 
of Commtinism, " which traces the history bf this atheistic philpso- , 
phy since ;lts inception and contrasts communism with our own c ., 
heritage of*freedom» Cop ies ma^be available at,your local public 
library. t ~~~ : s "^~ 



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MAILED/30 

MAY 3 19$3 

COMM-F^i 



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Sincerely ypurs> 
& £dgar Hoover 






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Sullfvan ^ 
Xavel ~~ 
Ttottert__ . 
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' EnclosorjBS (5) 

Let's Fight Communism Sanely! 

^FaithhGbti-^Our Answer To Obmmunism' 1 

4-17-62 Internal. Security Statement 

The Communist Menace: Red Gpals and.Christian Ideals-. 
^X3ne Nation* s Response To Communism 

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April 28, 1963 




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Mr. Callahan-^ 
Mr K Conrad^l 





Mr, J, Edgar Hoover 
Director of The F.B.L 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

I am employed at the Anniston Army Depot, AhMStOtt, Ala. L y 

I have just finished reading your book which you have written. The 
name of this book is^'Masters of Deceit. " 

Mr. Hoover, I wish that every American would read this book. 
Maybe it would open their eyes to what is going on in the United States. 

I am a husband, and father of two children. We are -members of the 
Bynum Baptist Church here at Bynum, Ala. We are having a program 
at the church soon, and I will use some of the things that are in this book. 
I hope that it will show these boys how the communist are trying to deny 
God. 

Mr. Hoover, I am writing you to let you know that I think it is 
time tha Christian people should stand with you against the Communist. 
And that we should do our part in standing against the Communist Party. 

I believe that when a country de storys their beliefs in God, they have 
also destored their freedom. 




m&Jk&tfi&Z*** 



It is nice to know that when many Am< 
is on the job, working night & day to help keep America free. 

Mrr Hoover, I think you are -among the greatest Americ^j, ^^53 
pray that God will always bless you and keep your health, so ?hat you can 

inform the people more about what the Communist are trying to d o to the »j f ; 

American people, and how they are tyying to lead the American people the 6M 
wrong way with lies. m0& 

If you have time I would like to have an.answer'on this letter. ^ b6 



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May 6, 1963 



MrJ" 

Kduie JU Box 155 
Delhi, Louisiana 




Dear 



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Your letter of April 29th has been received.- oj 

Mo ©> 

I am glad to learn of your interest in helping to=s: *■ 
^stop the spread of communism, and that you haye found my: bogg, 
^" Masters of Deceit . " to be enlightening. I wish, also to thank 
you for your kind remark about the wbrk of this Bureau. 

The FBI does not disseminate the various material 
you seek. You may, however, wish to refer to my new book, 
"A Study of Communism," which is. a comprehensive study of the 
development and expansion of communism throughout the world. 
I suggest that you contact your local librarian for such guidance 
as she may be able to furnish. 

Enclosed is some literature on the subject of 
communism I hope you will find of interest. There is! no charge 
for the publications we are privileged to distribute. 



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Sincerely yours, 
0. Edgar Hoover 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



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Belmont . 
Mohr 



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Callahan iL 
Conral _, 
DeLoach _ 
Evans -- - - 
Gale '.-'." 



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Tavel _ 

Trotter „ 
Tele. Room , 
Holmes >_ 
Gandy _ 



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See Enclosures and NOTE next page 

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Enclosures 

Young People Can Help Defeat Communism 
Communist illusion and Democratic Reality! 
The Current Communist Threat 
Communist Party line 



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Rt, 1, Box 155 
Delhi, Louisiana 
April 29, 19% 




Mr. Hoover, 

Mr. Hoover I am a 15 year old boy in the tenth 
grade at Crowville High School. I have read your book "Masters 
of Deciet; n and found it very enlighting. I have thought it over 
and I would like to find out all I can about communism and help 
stop it T s spread. 

I would like to have all the writings of important 
communist, the history of communism; the plans for world 
conquest; the writings of men like you who explain it to the 
public; also I would like to have the writings of Mao-TE-Sung. 
I am very interested in world events and I would like to have 
a world map to keep up with the world events. 

I thank you for this information very much. I 
am glad the F. B. i. is doing such a good job; keep it up. 




Sincerely, te-/6 l W2lXL2'?!Z! 



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.©. MAY 7 ,963. 



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OFFICE OF DIRECTOR 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



April 27, 1963 

Hon. J. Edgar Hoover 
Director, FBI 
Washington, D. C. 




mR^trotter 

MR^JONES 



TELE. ROOM . 
MISS HOLMES 



MRS. METCALF 
MISS CANDY 




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Dear Sir, 

iO ^ 
In your book "Masters of 
Deceit!!, p 257 secohid paragraph you 
give credit and praise totcertain 
Jewish organizations as~?effective 
opposition to communispa, " This 
is a false statement and'^ou in your - 
position must know it is false. 

■'■■ *___ v_ 

*u *. ?fi§ y you must know of Joseph P^Kamp and 
the fight he 1 has made since 1919 against^communism. 
I refer you^to Mr. Kamp's "The Bigots Behind The 
Swastika Spree, » page 24 the first paragraph.* I would 
like to hear your explanation. 5 s 

A veryTpuzzled-here-to-fore. admirer of yours. 
Is there no one on our side? 



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x uarman Ko ad- i , , 
ScarsdaleTT^w YdrK': : 



12 MAY v618«S,V-i 




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P.S. Mr. Kamp's publishing address is: ~ 
3 f Headlines °" 

I Uu3°x 333, Westport, Conn. f 

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Mr._ 

Sales 1/ rjiaser 

General Bool?: Divisioii__^. 
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. 
383 Madison Avenue 
New York 17, New York 



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Old Account Number 3 001 847 — "Masters of Deceit" 
New Account Number 70 000 000 .— "A Study of Communism" 
and "Masters of Deceit" 

Dear Mr.l 



Enclosed you will find two checks. One in the amount of 
$2, 734. 06 covers Invoice Number 345676 dated June 6, 1982, in the amount 
of $1, 867.03 and Invoice Number 347079 dated June 12, 1982, in the amount 
of $1, 367. 03. Duplicate copies of these invoices are enclosed. According 
to our records, this completes the amount we owe Holt, Rinehart and 
Winston, Inc. 9 on the book, "Masters of Deceit." 

The second check in the amount of $7, 577. 57 covers 
Invoice Numbsr 434374 dated September 28, 1962,' for 3, 500 copies of 
"A Study of Communism." A duplicate copy of this invoice is enclosed. 



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At this time, X would like to order 100 copies of the papery 
back totbook edition and 200 copies of the hardback textbook edition of £ /A % , n n 
"A Study of Cpmmumfm." Your courtesy in these matters is deeply &*-*VufBt~ / /~ 

appreciated. S" '<r> A .>— ;£, nOT^ecGRDED. 

-r -'• ^ (W / "li|91 MA^-3%3 

With Jrin&personal regards, ^ff/W / ^"^ 

Ancerelyjours,^ 2- b* ? *^ 






Tolson 



Belrnont , 
Mohx 

Casper - 
Callahan 
Conrad 
poLoac 
Evan* 
Gale 
Bosen 
Sullivan 
Tavol , 
Trotter 
Tole. Boom 
Holmes 
, Gandy 



^MAILED. 30 

MAY 1^1963^ 

C0MI&FSI 



^ enclos ures (5) 

1 - Mr. DeLoach 

- Mr. Tolson 

- Miss Gandy 




Clyde Tolson n 






S.*»a: 



BOO! 




NOTE: When we first ordered "A Study of 
Communism," Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 
gave us a new Account Number 70 000 000 to 
cover both "A Study of Communism" and "Masters 



XEBor 
MAY 3 i%-y 



ypemutO of Deceit. 



OfT10MAL*fOltM NO. 10 ^\ 

UNITED STATES GOVERNOR 

Memorandum 



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FROM 



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subject: 



Mr. DeLoach 
D.C. MorreHgtt*" 



date: 5-2-63 



Tolson — . 
Belmont - 

Mphr 

Casper _ 
^Callahan , 
Conrad ^ 
DeLoach . 
Evans __ 
Gale _ 
Rosen __ 
Sullivan - 

Tavel 

Trotter _ 



Tele. Room , 
Holmes , 
{Sandy . 



] 



:9<:eARMANJtOAP; 



SGARSDALE, NEW YORK 

^ By letter dated 4-27-63, captioned individual vjtio is not 
identifiable in Bufiles made reference to the Director's book Masters of 




Deceit!' and questioned the statement therein praising certain Je wish organi- 



zations as "effective opposition to communism. " Mr.| (challenges 

this statement and refers to Joseph P. Kamp's, "The Bigots Behind The 
Swastika. Spuee. " He asked for the Director's explanation and comments, 
"a verjTpuzileji here -to-fore admirer of yours. " 



*j 



o*-< 



_- .V^ufiles reflect Joseph P. Kamp has a long record of being 
a hate n^gec} *who was cited for contempt by the House Select Committee 
on Lobbying Activities for refusing the names of individuals who had con- 
tributed^ the<Gonstitutional Educational League Inc. of which he is an 
officer. cKamrFs book is known in Bufiles as an.anti-semitic work. 



OBSERVATION: 



of bigotry. 



Bureau would gain nothing by injecting itself into this issue 



ft 



RE COMMENDATION: 



That correspondent's letter not be acknowledged. 



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561SfAY9 1963: 







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May 7, 1963 



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Mr. 

1412" Ninth ftreelfc Southwest 
Moffltrie, Geo^ia 

D£ar Mr* 



■\& 'j: 



I have, repeived. your letter .of April 29th and 
appreciate; your kind comments concerning "Masters of Deceit. " 

In. response to your request, it is a, pleasure to 
sen^ybUjSAme material I hope will be of .assistance. We do not 
•have/pBpWwm^Speech made by Khrushchev «3SDdte*p&(^tan, 
but it has been printed in various forms and may be available 
at.your nearest public library. 

" * ,also, 
- Perhaps you will 3&s& want/to read my-new book, 
"A Study of Communism; n which may a&BKpe located at your 
public library! This book traces \the history of communism since 
its inception and contrasts this eyii philosophy with pur heritage of 
freedom. . ' 



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ToIsoi> . 
k3elmont „ 
Mohr-^ 

Callahan , 

Conrad w 
DeLoach » 
Eyatfs w- 
Gate . 



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Rosen _ 



Sincerely yours, 

D.tdgatHc>oVefl_ 





tiff. tffrY 



Line 



Enclosures (5) 

The Current Communist" Threat,. The Communist B 

Communist Party, USA * " ^, r * ° . 

An Analysis of the 17th Natll Convention.of the q§, U$A and 3-1-60 LEB 

^Introduction Ml , (J3T J _ '. ^V _ * 

/Young People Can Help Deieaf 



-Asm ^ 



NOTE: Correspondent canriot^e_identiMi&a4h Bufiles.. 

,jH:jf . (?) hwg^ ^rmmn- - 






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Tele. Room £ 
[Holers 
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MAIL BOOM GZ3 TTEjUETYPE UNIT C3' 





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April 29, 1963 



j. Edgar Hoover 

United States Dept. of Justice 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington 25, D.G. 

Deaf Mr. Hoover: 



o 



I am currently reading your book, Masters o f Deceit. 
I have become greatly interested and inspired by ' 
this unique piece of literature. 

I am in the tenth grade this year. Last year we 
began our study of the "party". We are studying 
the basic doctrines at the moment. 



/ 



I would greatly appreciate material concerning the 
party in the United States. I would also appreciate 
a copy of the speech made by* Khrushchev at the 
Twentieth Congress of the Russian Communist Party 
which denounced Stalin. You stated in your book 
that it was released by our Department of :State in 
June, 1956. All information will be appreciated. 
Thank youl 



Yours truly. 




14-12 9th St. SW 
Moultrie, Georgia 



4? 



j|Va 3 8 1,,:1 i'W3 



3 MAY 8 1963 

EX417 — — 







OPTIONAL FORM NO. 1* 
MAY 1962 EDITION 
GSA GEN. RCO. NO. 27 



a 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 






1 




''subject: 



/ 



DIRECTOR, FBI 



SAC, BALTIMORE (94-382) (P) 



date: 5/6/63 



HOWARD E^fROW /f < 

AssistaxiiL^peJS&ntendent 
"State-of -Delaware 
Department of Public Insturction 
Research (Crime Reeords) 

Re Baltimore letter to Bureau dated 2/25/63. 



On 5/2/63, Mrs. 



Secretary to 



Dr. ROW, advised that Dr. ROW'S manuscript concerning 
the study of Communism has been in the hands of the 
printer for the past three weeks and is expected back 
in the near future. ^ 

A copy has been reserved for the Bureau and will 
be furnished to the Baltimore Office as soon as it is 
received in Dr. ROW»s office. This copy will be furnished 
to the Bureau when received. 










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<^3^Bureau 
2-Baltimore : 
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Tolson 

Beliaont 

Mohr 



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Miss| 



Dear Miss 



I have received your letter of May 1st and 
I want to thank you for your interest in my book, "Masters 
of Deceit. " 

In response to your request, I am enclosing 
some literature on the topic of communism which I hope 
will be of assistance. I regret, however, .that this .Bureau 
is unable to forward similar material on a continuing basis. 
In addition, you may wish to refer to my most recent book, "A 
Study of Communism, »» which is a comprehensive study of the 
development and expansion of communism throughout the world 
It may be available at your local library. 



MAILED. 30 

MAYS 1963 

fiQMM-FBl 



Sincerely yours, 

A Edgar Hoover < 



be 

b7C 




Enclosures (5) 

SEJE ^G£0§trp^g| AND NOTE NEXT PAGE 
DTP:lj>i3) 

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Enclosures , 

Letfs Fight Communism Sanely! 

4rl7-(32 Internal Security Statement 

,4r6l LEB Introduction 

The Current CommunistrfThreat 

Expose of Soyiet Espionage 



NOTE: Correspondent is hot identifiable.. MBufiles.; 



-2- 









261 Lom"bardy Heights 
Bridgeport, Ohio 
May 1, 1963 

J. E. Hoover: 

Please add my congradulations to the longfMst 
you must have already received for your book "Masters 

.of Deceit! 1 . I haven't quite finished it yet tiut 1 

decided I should wait no ioger to write you. 7 

Your book coupled with the controversy now taking 
place ; at the small hospital where I work as a register- 
ed nurse are responsible for my writing this,* 

Undoubtly you are acquainted, with the, controversy 
between the* JBellaire(Ohio) Medical Foundation and the 
trustees of the Bellaire City Hospital, 

I and many others are well acquainted^ with the % 
.vast infiltration of Communism in our Ohio^Valley and 
tin Belmont County in particular,. However, after reading 
half of your book it is really frightening to realize y 
just how deep a foothold it has and the number of f^ 
puppets it has acquired. 

Naturally we discuss these events during our tour; 
otff duty and wish there -was something we could do to 
help clear out these worms. So faraall we have done is 



talk. Now Mr. Hoover, what can weJLo ? /^— ?—? 



rJ? 






\i - t 12 MAY 10 1963 



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J*U/ 



ij^ 



< -, I .? nd f rs *and there is information along these lines 
available to the public for the asking. If fo please 
put my name on your mailing list. 



Jo 6 







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Date: ^J^GS 



i Transmit* the follbwingin 



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.(Type in plain text or corfe^ 






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folfcon 

Belmon: 

■UohY. 



(a <5*\ — J A ¥\Dl *7**7 — - JQjn (Priority or Methodof Mailing) ' ' 



tfo: -SAC,. Eo&tOn 



rom: pirector;,,.FBI 



BESEARGH .(CORRE.SPPNDE^GE :AND TOURS), 
BUDED, 5-^0-03 

Enclosed you will find:- 

;G3'Twa.-copies ; of self-explanatory communication' from captioned, individual^ 
FH One copy. of'the FBI La'W- ■Enforcement Bulletin. f—{ 

>P1 One'.copy of, the -Uniform Crime .Repcir'ts. bulletin^ 
P3 Other: --•'•,-• 



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Take following action; , 

rt Make .discreet inquiries of estqblished/spur,ces. to determine reputation of, 
captlpnedjhdivldual^qnd/pr organisation. Under no f , circumstances should 
correspqndehtbecome aware of our interests 
□ Hav§. correspondent interviewed to determine whether correspondehtjias 

any information of interest to .Bureau^ 
fn Have/ substance dt enclosed communication; made. available to. appropriate 
locaVlay/. enforce^meniofficiglsj Retain; copies. of jthis communication in 
ypur-possession'atMll times, J &*£ . . 

n Acknowledge enclosed commuhicatiori ,By ^mdUihg*enclqsecl h Bureau,j>ubll- 
cqtion orpublicatiqns to correspondent: to address indicated, following* *- 
your determination of stdtusjn law enforcements If correspondent ik hot^ 
type of person to ; whom we want to*furnish this material,^ does nQjjjiave 
legitimate interest in law enforcement matters, correspongeht/shauld, be 
contacted and informed* that our budgetary; iimitations i .i:esLtrict Jts-dystri^ fc 
butioh;and*teqdest pannot &e*grante,& A'dyise Bureau 6f4jfction tqkerr, 
|oge(her with recommendation as to: whether; correspondent's n&mecsb'ojilcL 
-be added tqpur mailing list. * " . 

Q Submit results under above Caption io reach Bureau no later than 
'G3 'Submit jesults-dnd recommendations as to whether or not Bureau should. 
* comply* witkxequest, under abpve caption, to. reach Bureau jiq later than 6«.2O>03. 

■gothe^ Corrcspondeatig not; idc^tlfi|pla ih^gflkja^, ^ 



-,Conrad t . ^ 

'DeJLoach*« 

Evans >_ 

\ Malone _„ 

\Rosen w^_ 

Sull/varn* . 

Tavel , « 

Trotter^ 

Gdnilf— 



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NOTE:, Forin in-absence reply sent 5-14-63,; no yellow or abstract made.^ 
Foliow-^ua aao lo r - SO - G3 . ~ r ' ^ % ( ^v -V: ; F*£-*V ^ 

€!^V 1$f<mP""' ** fa 

^Sent WJaROOM | I th f typf unit f~l T >X '^jf\* j( ^ /£^ fj^/rS^^^ 



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. MarllDorb,, Mass* 
. -. May 8> 190 
JV EDGAR HOQVBEE 

Director' of the* FvBvI* . - - 

Washington, 3)., a. - _ _ - ; ^ 

Dear Mr* Hoover; , 

oA$ * As y° u ^PF as*, well as? 1 do> we arg not safe any more. The Communists 
are taking tq> much tlxe>e daysv Tt da not a time tb^ *si;fc and wonder what 
are; they goring to do? next,. but a time for action. 

". 1 would *like to reprint someJ of your hooky, Masteya of deceit* 
"The pa£t that I want is^on page 305,. I want to .reprint the cartoon 
putoiishe.d in, the Worker on Christ in the, form x>f a wanted criminal;. 
iThis- is ah: absolute necessary for .my worky please allow me -to -use^this, 

thane: you. 



f Mrl 

Mr. 
Mr- 
Mr* Callahan, 

Mr. 

Mr. Rosette 
Mr, SiiUivan. 
Mr» Tavel™ 
Mr. Trotter- 
/Tele^ Boom— 
'Miss-Holmes-x 
Miss'Gandy- 



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PiSV £EBASB; HEPLY BT 4IR'.Mp-TIEAM: YOIT 

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OFFICE OF DIRECTOR* V 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGAJ^N 

UNITED States DEPARTMENT OF \Jt\cb 



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MR. TOLSON _ _ 



MR. BELMONT 
MR. MOHR _ 



MR. CASPER 




MR. ROSEN 

mr. sullivan" 

MR. TAVEL 



MR./T ROTTER 
. JONES 



MR 



TELE. ROOM 

t 

M £ |5S HOLMES 



MRS. METCALP 




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To 



Director of FBI,Mr .J.Edgar Hoover, 
Washington, D.C^ 



Dear Sir, 



f 



o 



I recently read your book "Masters of Deceit" and 

*- • ■ ■ nam - 

I completely am agreeng with it,especially with 
chapters 22 and 24< But in the same time I do think, 
that participation of private citizens in the struggle 
for preservation of our freedom and liberties is 
futile and in some degree dangerous while on the 
top are "advisers" of Rosiovs brand. 

Very truly yours N. N. 




P..S. Here I»M enclosing some excerptions from 
newspaper articles* I,II,and III, 




OMAY29jffi 





a MAY -83" 1963 



***& 




Vww w hwm i w^w i ^^ 




IJJ^riocfer, 
Director of Federal Bureau of Mpoii, 

9th & k Pennsylvania Ave, 1,1, 
tenir^on, M, 







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Copy 



, MO EBI THE?* 3W,? . ' ' 

'^..George Sokolski f »$*!L962 ) 

* ' - 

$Ke SLOQA1J ; i'Khp Rronipt 5 ed £efess^ is not to be igr\pi?ea,Eor u; long time the question * 

of tiho% Ifei th> Consists into otu* (khr6rxidqrii h$s been a?kfeji but neye^ anstferedy ! ^ \ 
In one p£ the* tfemier Go&fidttese repp:rts>p&ri 1$ of the SnteSrfopkiijg Subversions in 

Government departments n ^eri^s^ppe&r the ttiiiutes^ of a riavy Depaiinent ^ieet|iig held 
Kay i9,A94?*£x^s6i& were* The Secrfet&^Mr?* gv&rk Knox^the Assistant Seoreiar^ ^^Ralj^r 

l,B&rd| Vice-chief of Naval Oparatipns^Yice Admiral £v#,Honie; ) Rear Adaii&I £ f &Wilkih--< 
sonjRea^ Admiral S^Ifopperjaea* Adm, Adotphfxs StatonjCa^aiii J>B^»Hall^rjide^eriaftt 

Coi^rid©r F.CJB^oxtfan^ Commander F.G#CasHey: , £i^utfenarit I^.Baar^lag. . ;i 

EiiPiidiiffijiT op toSi .- ' " ' '*■ \ 

, The j>iN>bl«Ka landed discussion w&s the ^pioyaeiit pf ttpmnuhista as f radio ;6per&tdtf& atjd * 
&St m&afeers pf defence €pnCTihicati<3ns jBodz*4 Committees* The riiimtes report th#- following; 

"Adnir&l frpoper then stressed the darigei* of Corarunist p&r£y cells in the transportation 
and communication iifdustrie§^and in the Armed Ser\ricea>and hoyf the communist pairty w£($ 
striving with &U its power to establish such pelie * 

"fie said it was an odious, and priory military principle that these cells should not 
be allowedjto exi^t for a tsinute in nilitary and naval m^^^^^^^^m tsnits; 

tte£ the * Vonnarci&l cOiAimic&tipn systems were £a impotent and integral part of the 
military &nd r&y&X cbnsaunicatipns nptwrksj and that it^thej^foi'e^becafae £ duiy of jfchopj* s 
off icers Jbi the Itayy fiepartmerifc thai were 6Harged 'with the security of naval cOmuniea^ 

tipns W bring the gravity ^f the si^uatili to the attejiiibri of the Secretary 4.%'*K " : 

Secretary of tjie Navy^Fxax^ JQipx^a? a Republican member- -of itrJtooiwelt* s cabinet. Her 
effectively vetoed Adnir£L Hoopers ot^ectipn to employing Coi£muni$fcs and what/ Jie; said l 
imst b§ a:ppliga i& aJLL u^pa^%ent^ of Government •this $# f Scoii: th3 official idntjtSs'-tff ; ( 
this Meeting Vriich Opcured qn,m^X%l^kSir ^ / - ^ 

"the Secretary then, £poke and said that her held no brief fSr^the Activities pf $htf COm-~i* r 

mimist party>but that th$r President- had et$ted that,cohsiderins the fact the United ~ ^\\ 

States and Russia *fere allies it, this tfce v ^>nd thai the Cprrr^nist .fcarty and the Oni-< iA\ 
ted States efforts r Were hP¥ bent toward PUr wdiining fcWe^ war^the Spited States was boundi 
to iiot pppdse the activities of the cofeitm3^t paxrty^attd spec^ieali«jr,to npt disapprove 
the enploynent pf any radio operator for the ^dle i'eOsSPn thai he Was a ft6siber Of th& 

Cpcsiunist p^fcby^ or that Tie *was actite iri' Con&uhist _party affairs ♦The Secretary fur- 
ther stated? that, this was an x>rder and mi?t be obeyed ^without j^ehtai reservation. IC 

ORDER BI E0057ELf # In ai^rd^the.order to adiaxt Conntiniste into the Govertaent cane 
directly frbn the Pr^eid^nt -of the United States, Frankldh D r Roos^elt. 
This teStJtaonjf fiqes not cope f xpzi % Senator pr ek AntirQodauhist agit^tarjit is frosi 
a; formal ttayal apcu&ejit di^ty 'signeft dnd ^p|)rc^ed.A<i?iiral Staton testified that the 

minutes Accps^ted i4th hiaf vp^l^io^ of the tieeting/The ?,, f <xlloving cblloqui ,i^ his- 
torically icipprtant j - \ \, 

"Mr* Gyiaest AdEiipal,bef6re IJask^ you about that faceting), X would tike to ask, 
you Aether or not_ td your Jcnowledge, anypiie siw a written memorandum f^££^ ? 
"Admiral Staton; les, $£v,X did* I had it ifi W haiid but I cpuldn J t keep it^» 






I' 



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TH8 WOTED S£A?ES OT $HE ;t>$10 AHENA^by prof «Rosfov. 
(somes excerptions) 

"The m&in fact In .diplomafcy of IJnite/d States- in Europe 
3ust after World Y7ar Second was ,that East-Europe was 
surrendered to Soviet Russia ,pld;divifcidn of :Europe ac~ 
cordihg Blbe linfe found as more or less legitix$ate out-^ 
cosies of -the war* To fche United States it vjas not completely 
clfear %he range o£ their interests in Burope>KhaJk afrout. 
the libsrat^on. of Eastern Europe frosa Russia - it is dif- 
ficult even to £t?in!c,>iand not because it could endanger 
the military security of goviet; Uhion,but. because it 
would signify 4 ideological defeat with far reaching con-r - 
Sequences as in undeveloped countries now under Soviets . 
offensive so 3ri. jftussia itself in its effort to. fortify 

the oommunisiaf. <* ^ l . . 

(According; the fam&yrname » }$£vRostdv prot&bly is £ roa 
Russian origirt^eople sajr the abo^e; mentdojied book 
paved the road to #hite House for hid^fow 5 he 4s one of 
adtiserri, t<y President Jn. order tor protect comsnnisa 
h? £s ready* to justify even feannibali^»i; ); 

7T * ' - ?A0C3*fACT^P*S GERMANS, - 

JLfA* > # ,~ lay Walter j^ippsjahn* _', - - - "" 

>*The right approach, %d the Gerxaan questiOn/jbhe right 

* way to ^aceiriate the Germans is„ by taHirfg seriously -the 
problem of (Jerfeari ^euh^icatiojuThis has been impossible*,- 

* und^r pr# Adenauer •Kheh -)ie ^eaves^office^itV shbyld begirt ._ 
to be possible to interest the Vfest^f German jgovernmen&^- 
in ^he, prpsp^fct of gradual and controlled drawing to-*" *\" 

r- gethei* pf the. two Germanys." ^ * v - .*■*•:* 

<X do not think £ l^.Mppaann 4s supposing *uhder reuni-r 
fication free elections ? civil liberties and private 
enterprise in. all Qermany.&o doiibt ^ he: proposes extension 
#f pommunist domination, from Elbe to Hhine , i.ev to 
ovsleap the Rostov's ^legitimate, outcome pf the wSr^) 



TV 



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OPTIONAL FORM NO, Id 

50lMCtt*ttt 



♦ ^v 



UNITED STATES GcOrNMENT 

Memorandum 



Q 



TO 




DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, BOSTON '( 9^739) '(H&C) 
ii 



date: 5/18/63 



subject: 



m 



MARLBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS) 



Re Bureau airtel to Boston, 5/1 V^3. 

Confidential inquiries made at Marlboro, Mass. by SA CLARENCE 

the following information 
159 Mechanic St., Marlboro, 



regarding 
Mass.: 



In December, 1956, 



juvenile, 14 years 



of age, was arrested by the Marlboro, Mass. Police 
Department on a charge of Arson. This case was disposed 
of in the Juvenile Court by continuing the case for a 
year. No finding was determined after one year n vi 
probationary period. 



3' 



High School class of 1251i_ 
Mass, His father is [ 



is a graduate of the Marlboro T Mass. 



He was born 



lL 



I at Marlboro 
J a re'friger^K 



engineer by occupation, who has a good character and busine 
reputation in this community. 

During his attendance at the Marlboro High School it was 
confidentially d etermine d from personnel of the Marlboro 
High School that I | was considered an "odd ball" of 
questionable mentals/capacity, and believed in need of 
psychiatric examination and care. He reportedly admitted 
to seeing apparitions in his bedroom, on an occasion or £* 
two, and indicated on an occasion being psychic and "full^? 
of premonitions". He was not considered harmful or dangerous, 
but rather odd, peculiar and strange to a minor degree. He 
reportedly has undergone stages of being very fervent andT 
religious, and was subject to various changing moods, 
although never indicating any inclination to violence _* 
or harm. 





- Bureau 

- Boston 



&*&&~ /*s* 7&~ 9*j 2 f 



CRG/raar 





-TDK" " ■ " '" "" ~ 

o 



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BS 94-739 

His academic record was fair. He hasi since graduating 

from high school, been <employed .as a cleric at a local 

Tfffr atnre. a grocer y "firm, and resides with his parents, *>e 



at | |", Marlboro, Mass. He has never been b7c 

known to write articles or such,, and his ability along 
this line would be questionable. His ability as an 
author is therefore "not known, and it is said that he 
indicated, as a student, his lack of any such abilities. 

In view of the above information, based on limited 
Inquiries as suggested in referenced airtel, the 
consideration granted this individual is being left 
to the discretion of the Bureau. 



2. 



y, <* 



\ 



ornoHAi roRM no. 10 ^^ 

UNITED STATES GOVEW j[ENT 

'Memorandum 



to : Mr. De Loach 



from : D. C. Morrell 



SUBJECT 



<? 



^^ T 



date: 5-22-63 



Tolson _. 
Belmont - 

Mohr 

Casper — 
Callahan . 
Conrad — - 
DeLoach . 
Evans — 
Gale _ 




Rosen ___ 

Sullivan 

Tavel - 

Trotter - 
Tele. Room . 
Holmes «■_ 
Gandy . 



MARLBORO, MASSACHUSETTS _ 




By letter dated 5-8-63, captioned individual requested permission 
to reprint fronP 'Masters of Deceit. " He said he wanted material on page 305 
and was going to reprint the cartoon published in the "Worker on Christ 1 ' in the -be 
form of a wanted criminal. b?c 

By airtel 5- 14-63, the SAC at Boston was requested to make a 
discreet inquiry of 



By letter dated 5-18-63, Boston advised that 



n 



graduated from 



high school in 1961. Acquaintances of his at this school considered him to be an 
"odd ball" of questionable mental capacity. It was believed that Chaput was in need 
of psychiatric examination and care. At one time, he reportedly admitted seeing 
an apparition. Although he was not considered harmful and dangerous, he was 
considered peculiar and strange to a minor degree. Based upon this information 
coupled with the fact that his ability to write articles would be questionable, Boston 
made no recommendation as to complying with his request or hot.leaving it to the^ 
discretion of the Bureau. 

Page 305 of "Masters of Deceit" pertains to methods utilized by j 
the communist underground and included a paragraph devoted to "colonizers" wno' 
would Ascend into an area and attempt to influence young people particularly those 
in their 20 f s or 30's. They were described as "sleepers? who might rise up 
against but Nation. 

OBSERVATION: 

It is not clear exactly what the correspondent intends to reprint 
from the Director's book nor is it clear what tesmeant by his proposal to use 
as a cartoon. 




Prjks (2)\lt) 



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(12 MA? &4 1863 




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RECOMMENDATIONS: 

1. That no permission be granted to correspondent to reprint 
from "Masters of Deceit" in view of his, questionable ability and background. 



2. That the in-absence sent under the date of May 14, 1963, 
stand as the only acknowledgment to his letter. 




- 2 



1/ 



;t *-'«s),33. J (Rey. ,3-7-63) 



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FB.J 



Date: 6-5-63 



Transmit the following in 
Via 



iJ 



(Type in plain text or code). 



$/ 



Airtel 




mk§w& 



. Mb3i&-ek.:y.4J/JLlZZ. 




(Priority, or Method of Mailing) 



To: sag, i,os Angeles 

.Director, FBI 

MRS. I I 

PASADENA, CALIFOKNIA 

RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS) 
BUDED 6-10-63 



i 



Enclosed you 1 will find:. 

^1 Two copies of self-explanatory communication- from captioned indi; 
□ One copy of the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin.- ^ 

Q One copy -of' the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin.. 






*- 






□ Other: 



# 






a 



h 



an,. 



Tolsoi 

Belraojit 

Mohr 

Caspe 

Callah 

Conrad- 

DeLoaeh 

Evans ~ 
jGalo - 
Rosen— 
Sullivan — 
Tavel . _ __ 

Trotter .. 

Tele. $oom „ 
Holmes j-—- 
Gandy __ 



Take following action:, 

BTI Make discreet inquiries of established sources to determine reputation of 
captioned individual and/or organization. Under no circumstances shoulcl 
correspondent become aware of our interest,. y 

□[Have correspondent interviewed todetermine^whether correspondent's, ^ 
any information of interest to Bureau, ** * 

I | Have substahce*6f enclosed communication made available to appropriate^ 
local law enforcement officials. Retain copies of this, communication in ^ 
your, possession at all times. ^ • * 

I I Acknowledge enclosed communication by mailing enclosed Bureau publi- 
cation or publications to correspondent to address indicated, following r 
your determination of status in law enforcement. If correspondent is not £> 
type of person to-whoia we want^ to furnish this material! or does* not have 
legitimate interest in law enforcement matters, correspondent should be 
contacted and informed that our budgetary limitations restrict its .distri-? 
.button and request cannot be granted. Advise Bureau of action taken) ~ 

together with recommendation as to whether correspondent's name should /\/fJ 
be added' to our mailing list. 

n Submit results under above caption to reach Bureau jio later than, 

[jjp Submit jresults „and recommendations ,as to whether or not Bureau should 

complY--w4lfa Lifiquest. un der above caption, .to reach- Bureau ho later than (J^JO-63 

nothing identifiable withxorresppndenic^\ 



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10^5^X^^!l N (fo^/^O^ "», 



Follgw-upm 

NQ.TE: Correspondent sent l in-absence^fqrm,,reply s oh6cf5-63^ no yellow or 



abstract 

: JBlMA 

•Sent ViV-tlsil 



>repared. vA 




**>S 



.M Per 



MAIL-ROOM O TELET.YPJ5UNtTL~3 






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727 J^C 11 , Bast „ Qr^nge ^Gr o ve Boulev ard,^ 

Pasadena,^ C alifornia 
tfay 29, 1963 



**( — 



Honorably J. iLUgui* ,v *Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

It is indeed a rare, though belated, 
privilege to congratulate you on the 
Fortieth Anniversary as head of the F.B.I 
Wor$s fail to express my gratitude for 
your great service to America, indeed, 
the whole world. 

Like many others, I feel sure that God 
alone has inspired you in your very im- 
portant task and He knows the extent of 
your wonderful achievements as head of 
the F.B.I. I truly believe that you 
and General Mc Arthur are the two great- 
est Statesmen of all time. 



Quotations from your inspiring book - 
Q 1 Ma s ter s of __D e.ce i jb^ have come to my atten- 
tion. I shoulLoC"very much appreciate hav- 
ing a* copy of my own, autographed by you 
personally.- I would read and re-read it 
as it certainly *bpars repetition. 

God bless you, and yours, richly, and 
may He keep you at the helm of the Great 
Feder.al Bureau of Investigation, for many, 
msfny ye ar s *h b c ome . 

Most Sincerely 



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Mrs. 1 




East 607 Columbia 

Spokane 23; Washington _ 



Tolson , 



, Belmont "„ 
Mohr ___i 
Casper^-. 
Callahan 
Conrad — . 
DeLoach , 
Evans __ 



Gale* 

Rosen — 
Sullivan . 
Tave! — 
Trotter . 



Dear Mrs; 




I have received the letter from you and your 
husband postmarked May 27th and want you to.know how much 
I appreciate your generous comments, regarding my adminis- 
tration of the FBI and my bookr^M^^^MJ^^^ K is 
encouraging to hear from individual citizens who express 
concern over the problems posed by the communist conspiracy, 

I am enclosing material some of which contains 
suggestions all of us can use in the fight against this deadly 
menace* Perhaps you wilt also want to jead my new book, 
"A Study of Communism, " which may be available in your 
local library. 



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Sincerely yours, 
Qm Fdgax Hcrsvbb 




Enclosures (5) 

Shall It, Be Law pr Tyranny? 

Deadly Duel 

Let's Fight Communism Sanely! 

My Answer to. Communism and Crin 

The Current Communist ThriS atV ^ " " 

NOTE : Neither :Mr . , Aor Mr £. is identifiable in Buf iles. 




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TRUE COPY 



J. Edgar Hoover 
Director, F. B. I. 

Dear Mr. Hoover, 

It is with heartfelt feelings & the sincerest gratitude that I 
write to thank you for taking the time to write your book, "Masters of 
Deceit. " I regrettfully admit that even though the book was published 
in 1957, I didn't have the interest to read it until: 1963. I hate to admit 
I had no interest in helping preserve our freedom. Now both my husband 
David & I are doing all we possibly can to educate our neighbors, and 
anyone we might come in contact with, just how precious & wonderful our 
country is. We have both joined' a conservative group of Republicans and 
are now Area Chairmen of 8 precincts under the direction of a very 
dedicated Wallace Heaton, 5th District City Leader. 

The point I'm getting at, is, God Bless prn, Mr. Hoover. 
Maybe someday I can have the privilege of meeting you if you should 
come out our way. I pray to God the whole nation can be protected by 
your strength for many years to come. It is a very comforting thought 
to know we have someone like you using your wisdom and convictions 
every day to safe guard our security. Please rest assured that Spokane, 
Washingtons 5th District is behind you all the way. 

Again, God Bless You, maybe someone can tell me how 
our country was so blessed as to have you in such a vital position. 

Most respectfully, 




be 

b7C 



E. 607 Columbia 

Spokane 23, Washington ^ ^ ^ 

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FBI 



Date: 5/31/63 



(Type in plain text on code) 



Airtel 



Via inroex = gn ,.^- : - s = 



1 



Tolson 



Belmont 
Mohs 



•Casper 

Callahai 

: Getter 
Hosen , 



From: 



San Antonio 



MISS[ 



Director FBI 



SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

RESEARC^(CORRE.SP0NDENCE AND TOURS) 
mihrn 6/5/63 



BUDED 



Enclosed you will find: 

fig Two copies of self-explanatory communication Jrom .captioned individual, 

□ One, copy of the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin. 

CD One copy of ifre Uniform Crime Reports bulletin. 

£3 Cither: - '' - . 



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o 

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Jake following action; * 

O Rake discreet inquiries of established sources, to determine reputation x>£ 

captioned individual; and/or organization. Under no circumstances, should j_~f ;£; 



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o 







correspondent beconoe* aware of oum interest. 

O Have .correspondent interviewed tot determine whethex pprrespondent has 
any information of interest to Bureau.- 
- Q jtfafre" substance of;enclosed^cpmmunicqtion made available to appropriate, 
'"^ local law enforcement officials. Retain copies of; this icommumcqtiori in. 
your possession at all times. 

Q3 Acknowledge enclosed communication* by mailing enclosed JBuregu publi- 
cation or publications to correspondent jtp address indicated,, .following 
your determination of status in, law; enforcement. If correspondent is not 
type, o{ person to wl^om we want to furnish this .material, or does v nbj have 
legitimate interest fn iaw^ enforcement matters, correspondent should be r 
contacte<d^nd informed tkqt our budgetary limitatiqns restrict its, distri- 
bution^and request cannot ,be l grqrited. Advise Bureaji of dctjonriaken, 
together with recommendation bs to whether^corjespondent's name should 
be added' jLo our mailing list. 

□ Submit results under, above caption to reach Bureau no later, than; * 

(32 Submit results and recommendations as to whether of not Bureau should 

comply with jequest, under above* caption, 'to reach 1 Bureau no later than 6/5/63. \ 

m other: Correspondent is not identtf i^ble in Buiiles. J%fa.^^ 







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m.ETYPEUNI?CID 



Tele, 

Holmes 
Gaiidy 



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Tolson « 
Belmont - 

Mohr 

Caspar — 
Callahan . 
Conrad _ 
DeLoach , 
Evans ^_ 
Gale _. 
Rosen _„ 
Sullivan - 
Tavel _. 
Trotter 



Tele. Room . 

Holmes « 

Gandy J 



May 31, 1963 



REC- 69 fr j* - (6 ¥£ 77—^) f 33 



iV'i, 



Miss[ 



406 Byrnes Drive 

San Antonio^J&sas ^ 



Dear Miss 



Your letter was received on May 28, 1963, 
and I want to thank you for your interest in writing. 

Although Mr. Hoover is not in the city at 
this time, you may be sure I will bring your letter to 
his attention upon his return. I know he will appreciate, 
as I do, the prayers you are offering on our behalf. 

Sincerely yours, 

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Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 



/NOTE: Correspondent was not identifiable in Buttles. , The bopk/'^ ^ [/ t/v/^~ 
~SJJ:lml f, correspondent enclosed is a copy of ^Master s^o^ \j &** 
L$) r ^Deceit/' ^^m—u-um- 











MAIL ROOM O TELETYPE UNIT (Z3 





DO-£ 

m ^ofSce of director 

*FEDfeRi\b^UREAU OF INVESTIGATION* 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

(May 28, 1963) 

Dear Mrs., Gandy 

I am indeed sorry it was not 
possible for me to visit your office 
during my recent visit to D. C. 
Our thoughts and prayers are with 
you and Mr. Hoover constantly. 

Would you please ask him to 
autograph the accompanying 
copy of his book. I am forced 
to close my store June 1, but 
will keep a complete library 
and do what I can in this cause. 



Sincerely, 



MR 



TOLSON 






BELMONT 
MR. MOHR 



MR. CASPER 



MR. CALLAHAN 

MR. CONRAD 

MR. DELOAC 

MR. EVANS 

MR. GALE . 

MR. ROSEN 




MR. SULLIVAN 
MR. TAVEI 



MR. TROTTER 

MR. JONES 

TELE* ROOM — 



MISS HOLMES 
MRS. METCALF 
MISS GANDY 



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Recently, in Ruth snot's column in the forger News*, there was 
mention of an editor' js comment frotn January , 1%6? $ Journal of Nat f l. I 
Asso. of WomQn jDoanS & Counselors. I located this magazine in 
, the library of Jncam^te Word College and learned the entire i,sSUo 

vaa devoted to the role of the ^counselor in sex behavior and standards • 
lp , % was interesting tq note thati<thiS organization is a department of 
KBA, 1201 l6th\S£., il.W. Kashijiglfcon 6, P. C, Subscription for the 
quarterly is $5.00 per year, or $1*25 por copy. 

The* foil owipg &r& excerpts frojn this editorial. 

*' Crises are inevitable, soul-searching routine and confusion rampant ,„ 
for sex behavior and sex ethics have "become national problems;, 
s~\ acknowledged, unsavory and unsolved. •• .the problem for the counselor 
(yis the prevejntiVQ program She inay be expocted to proppse. • ...thQ 
following papery (articles la the quarterly) on the physiology, 
; psychology, socidlogy and ethics of sex can cnlargor her vocabulary, 

yiatfcoduce her to new concepts, arid sejb nejy di/s'epsions for her perspec- 
tive ^. ♦. .Controls of the pasjt (fear and authority ) (;(oHVctiireri'ess) ) 
are waning. Nejiicinq and all.science ^ave contributed to this situh- 
tion and so have sociology arid psychology^ -with, net* x*ays of regarding ^ 



\ 



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faan an4 hi« society. 

"Today we believe that we see a $rond in the history of human thinkipg, 
a mo"virig away from #, prudential (fear <% authority) ethic, toward, a " 
social ^ethic ^the greatest good of the .greatest number) .« ..Is education 
ho t>o, the sole method of inculcating adequate moral standards. .♦.;♦. 
Ethical standards were originated somehow by the earliest primitive 
Society and have somehow survived. Our present dilXemm^ stem? riot so 
much? from disbelief in the findings bf social science, npi* from a diSr 
agreement with general ethical change, but rather from, practical 
difficulties -which. wo foresee f or :our profession. .♦• ..We are pushed to 
the very foreground of those thigh ty changes • • . . . .%T IS THE COUNSELOR 
NOT THE CLERGYMAN, VHO MUST 1 DEVELOP VOJJ^'S CQ^CIENCEj, IT IS THE 
EDUCATOR VtilQ ts CALLigp UPON %0 TAKE THE XBADIN6 ETHICAL ROLE. . % *h^+? 

n H6w many decades will it take to; perfect and accelerate our present 
inadequate methods of teaching good standards of behavior?....,... 
In this transition era between one arid another kind of control, how 
fast can wq&lough off the old attd take on the not*? How do we Know 
^ben^iffe * l& safe, tjo. wipe out the old fears and disapprovals and loosen 
the" hold of Authority r f 

COLLEGE YOUTH & SEXUAL CONfUSJON, by LeStor Kirkcjidalli (article) 
"Power of fear eyoking threats bas been markedly decreased? ♦ • *.,•>• 
Tratdil?iphai values are boin£ further challenged by extensive cultural 
intermingling *whic$j f npw s involves persons of all races, all 

nationalities arid alX the worlds religions* 1 '* 

' ~ ...... ^ .. * 

SEX <& THE COLLEGE &ERL, )tora Johns o^ (Atlantic Monthly, Nov. 1959 )x 
n £he £ac;t is that lacking a solid background of Christian ethics,, inost 
girls have only a couple of vagiie rules of thumb to go by, which they 
cling to fceyond all sense ar\d readkofi, and these contradict eabh other. 
One is that anything is alright if you are in love (American dream of 
loye) and the other is that a girlvmust£ be respected particularly by 
the mari\she wants to marry (ethical view left oyer from grandma}.' 1 

Oct. '61 V. 2£, #1 (Resting} Apr. 1 62 ^ V. 25, #3 (Co-od Residence Halls]* 
*iarcbt % h%, V. XJI, 9r Group; pyhamics ., (Those might be issues you would 
want to order 0f the Journal of ffat 1 !. Asso # of Women Deans.* 



Familiar cries of combat warn of the dan- 
gers of federal control; although numbers in- 
crease who refuse to be terrified of their own 
government. 

The real battle involves no such principles. 
It is simply, unglamorously, a matter oj 
money. 

The' great mass of American people, whose 
children fill the schools, want more money 
spent on education-on .teachers and facilities 
and subject matter which they believe, rightly 
or wrongly, will mean better, richer futures. 

Once public education has been made as 
much a federal responsibility' as* national de- 
fense or national highways, more money than 
was ever dreamed of will be spent on it. More v 
than ever of the nation's wealth will be taken 
from those who possess it and spent on the, 
education of the nation's children., 

That harsh, impolite economic truth is at 
the root oj the apposition to federal aid to 
schook 



) 






ty 



JOHNIMcGORMALLY 



Execuf/VeEd/for 



•THUTCHINSONINEWS 

HutchinsonMansas 










for Additional Copies of Hiis'Pamptilet Write: 

\ Division of 
Federal Relations 

NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 
:';'/ 1201 SIXTEENTH STREET, O. 




f nm> 



6, D.C. 





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Young America will go back to school this 
month against a'background of loud and bit- 
ter bickering* over the future of its schools. 

The fight over federal aid to education is, on 
the surface, a political fight, with spicy dashes 
of racial prejudice and religious bitterness 
thrown in. 

But under the surface, in reality, ft is an. 
economic battle-ok of the .oldest and hard- 
a est fought in this country Jt falls in the classic; 
pattern of historic battles between the haves 
and the have-nots, between those who control 
the wealth of the land and those who make, 
l ip its masses. 

It is not popular-or even polite— to describe 
it in these terms. We are all brainwashed from 
childhood to pretend that the United States 
has no classes or masses; no sharp and funda- 
mental disagreement between its have minor- 
ity and have-not majority. 

We are all supposed to be of a mold -good, 
pert, freshly scrubbed Americans, believing, 
that capitalism and free enterprise came down 
to us on stone tablets from the mountain and 
that democracy was devised by angels, 

But the truth of the taatter is that the 
minority, who are the elite financially and 
culturally, do not trust democracy very far. 
( They tremble-and with good reason-at what 
I would happen to their wealth and position if 
the masses ever really could bring the vote of 
Uhe majority into full play. And they have 
spent the better part of 200 years devising 
little ploys (such as the House Rules Commit- 
tee) to thwart the will of the majority, all 
the while paying lip service to the word 
"democracy." 

And on the other hand, the majority, while 
it admits to something patriotic in the word 



"capitalism," particularly since it has become 
an antonym of "communism," nevertheless 
exerts most of its political energy-and has, 
been doing so since the last, c entury- wntyoH:, 
ing, curtailing; and translormmg capitalism in- 
to some formsand stages of socialism. 

The first and greatest of these social pro- 
grams-of channeling the wealth of the nation 
to the benefit of the masses-is the public 
school»system. 

But free public education (radical as the 
idea was and still is to some untainted patri- 
ots), was for a long time no great economic 
threat. As long as it remained local, it could 
be controlled; The masses might fill the 
schools with their children; but the commu-- 
nity leaders-its business and professional 
men-those concerned with preserving the 
community's wealth, controlled the schools. 
And they kept them inexpensive. 

This meant keeping them, in most cases, 
inadequate and crowded, with vastly under- 
paid and sadly undereducated and uninspired 
teachers. But it was cheap. 

But education feeds upon itself. Two gen- 
erations ago, when utterly uneducated par- 
ents sent their children to school they were 
amazed, overjoyed, and endlessly grateful for 
the one-room building and $30 teachers which 
the local landowners in their magnanimity 
had provided them. 

A generation ago more parents had been 
through high school and some had been to 
college and they began to insist, for their chil- 
dren, on fireproof buildings and teachers with 
degrees and public high schools big enough 
for everyone. 

Now this generation, with vastly improved 
tastes, wants, in addition, pastel walls and 




> 



multipurpose rooms, and foreign language 
and exceptional child programs, and teachers' 
with two degrees, and public colleges big 
enough for everyone. And this is anythingbut 
cheap. Soihe fight has (developed and grown 
. . . a fight between the monk with the wealth 
and the people with the kids, And each time 
wealth won-each time it dug in its heels and 
threw up a line against more spending— the 
parents (ably commanded by professional' 
educators) simply went around the end and 
started the fight all over again, in a larger 
arena. 

When district funds no longer sufficed be- 
cause some districts were so poor in property 
and rich in children, the fight -was made for 
county funds-for funneling wealth from the 
rich districts into the poor ones. And the next 
move was for the state* funds-for funneling 
the wealth from the rich counties into the 
poor ones. And now the battle is for federal 
funds-for funneling the wealth from the rich/ 
states into the poor ones! 

But the change is more than geographic, 
more than just a move to larger taxing, bases. 
The method of taxation changed too. The 
school district is limited to taxing real estate, 
no longer necessarily a true measure of wealth. 
But state and nation, with their sales mi 
income taxes, are in much better position to 
stick the rich. | 

So the battle goes on. This year, the tradi- / 
tional foes of federal aid, such as the National * / 
Association of Manufacturers and National / 
Chamber of Commerce, have 'been helped by 
such strange bedfellows |as J. Strom Thur- 
mond who is afraid the Negroes will get in and 
Cardinal Spellman who is afraid the Catholics 
will be left out. 



■•t "■" 

t 



*>* 



*■*, 



LOOKING 



i 

f 



UNTO 



JESUS 



*IC<*§2s>*0&- 



<• 



Translated from the French of 
THEODORE MONOD 

By 
HELEK WILLIS 



BEFORE READING 
TURN TO INSIDE BACK COVER 



SUPPLIED FOR YOUR INFORMATION BY; 

UNITED SOCIETY OF METH0DI3T LAY 'ti t i JO 

P. 0. BOX 417, AUSTIN 63, TEXAS 



1 

■i 



Anyone desiring additional copies of 
this booklet can secure same by order- 
ing from: 

Walter A. White 

Care of 

Christian Business Men's Club 

17 Third Street, N.E. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Single copy — 10 cents. 
20 or more — 5 cents. 

Postage paid. 






t. 



ft 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



H 






. . - "Looking unto Jesus **.... 
(Hebrews 22:2) 

Only three words, 

but in those three words 
is the whole secret of life. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 
in the Scriptures, 

to learn there what He is, what He has 
done, what He gives, what He desires; to 
find in His character our pattern, in His 
teachings our instruction, in His precepts our 
law, in His promises our support, in His 
person and in,. His work a full satisfaction 
provided for every need of our souls. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 
'Crucified, 

to find in His shed blood our ransom, our 
pardon, our peace. 



2 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



t 
I 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS , 

Risen, j 

to find in Him the righteousness which alone ^ 

makes us righteous, and permits us, all un- / 

worthy as we are, to draw near with boldness, 
in His Name, to Him who is His Father and 
our-Father,-His God and our -God. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 
Glorified, 

to find in Him our Heavenly Advocate com- 
pleting by His intercession the work inspired 
by His lovingkindness for our salvation ; 

(i Jn. 2:1) Who even now is appearing for 
us before the face of God (Heb. 9:24), the 
kingly Priest, the spodess Victim, continual- 
ly bearing the iniquity of our holy things 

(Ex. 128:38). 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

revealed by the Holy Spirit, 

to find in constant communion with Him 
the cleansing of our sinstained hearts, the 
illumination of our darkened spirits, the 
transformation of our rebel wills; enabled 
by Him to triumph over all attacks of the 
world and of the evil one, resisting their- 
violence by Jesus our Strength, and over- 



■ * ■ 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 3 

coming their subtilty by Jesus our Wisdom; 
upheld by the sympathy of Jesus, Who was 
spared no temptation, and by the help of 
Jesus, Who yielded to none. , 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 
Who gives repentance 

as well as forgiveness of sins (Acts S : 3 I ) 
because He gives us the grace to recognize, 
to deplore, to confess, and to forsake our 
transgressions.* 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

to receive from Him the task and the 
cross for each, day, with the grace which is 
sufficient to carry the cross and to accomplish 
the task; the grace that enables us to be 
patient with His patience, active with His 
activity, loving with His love; never asking 
"What am I able for?" but rather: "What 
is He not able for? >f and Waiting for His 
strength which is made perfect in our weak- 
ness, (a Cor. 12: p.) 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

to go forth from ourselves and to 
forget ourselves; so that our darkness may 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



flee away before the brightness of His face; 
so that our joys may be holy, and our sorrow 
restrained; that He may cast us down, and 
that He may raise us up ; that He may 
afflict us, and that He may comfort us ; 
that He may despoil us, and that He may 
enrich us; that He may teach us to pray, 
and- that He may answer our " prayers ; that^ 
while leaving us in the world, He may 
separate us from it, our life being hidden 
with Him in God, and our behaviour bearing 
witness to Him before men. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

Who, having returned to the Father's 
house, is engaged in preparing a place there 
for us ; so that this joyful prospect may 
-make us live in hope, and prepare us to 
die in peace, when the day shall come for 
us to meet this last enemy, whom He* has 
overcome for us, whom we shall overcome 
through Him — so that what was once the 
king of terrors is today the harbinger of 
eternal happiness. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 
Whose certain return, 

at an uncertain time, is from age to age 
the expectation and the hope of the faithful 



-— 






LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



Church, who is encouraged in her patience, 
watchfulness and joy by the thought that the 
Saviour is at hand. (Phil. 4:4, s:i;lThes m 
5**30 

.LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

the Author and the Finisher, 

of our faiths that is to say, He Who is its 
pattern and its source, even as He is its 
object; and Who from the first step even 
to the last marches at the head of the be- 
lievers; so that by Him our faith may be 
inspired, encouraged, sustained, and led on 
to its supreme consummation. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 
and at nothing else, 

as our text expresses it in one untranslateable 
word (apkoroontes), which at the same time 
directs us to fix our gaze upon Him, and to 
turn it away from everything else. 

LOOKING ,UNTO JESUS 
and not at ourselves, 

our thoughts, our reasonings, our imaginings, 
our inclinations, our wishes, our plans; — 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



UNTO JESUS 

and not at the world, 

its customs, its example, its rules, its judg- 
ments; — 

UNTO JESUS 
and_ not at Satan, — - _____ 



though he seek to terrify us by his fury, or 
to entice us by his: flatteries. — Oh ! from how 
many useless questions we would save our- 
selves, from how many disturbing scruples, 
from how much loss of time, dangerous 
dairyings with evil; waste of energy, empty 
dreams, bitter disappointments, sorrowful 
struggles, and distressing falls, by looking 
steadily unto Jesus, and by following Him 
wherever He may lead us. Then we shall 
be too much occupied with not losing sight 
of the path which He marks out for' us, 
to waste even a glance on those in which 
He does not think it suitable to lead us. 
UNTO JESUS 

and not at our creeds, 

no matter how evangelical they may^ be_ 
Thc faith which saves, which sanctifies, 
and which comforts, is not giving assent to 
the doctrine of salvation; it is being united 
to the person of the Saviour. "It is not 



[r 



j; 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



enough", said Adolphc Monod, "to know 
about Jesus Christ, it is necessary to have 
Jesus Christ". To this one may add that 
no 'one truly knows Him, i£ he does not 
first possess Him- According to the pro- 
found saying of the beloved disciple, it is 
in the Life there is Light, and it is in Jesus 
there is Life. (John / :+) 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at our meditations and our 
prayers, our pious conversations and our 
profitable reading, the holy meetings that 
wc attend, nor even to our taking part in 
the supper of the Lord. Let us faithfully 
use ail these means of grace, but without 
confusing them with grace itself; and with- 
„ out turning our gaze away from Him Who 
alone makes them effectual, when, by their 
means, He reveals Himself to us. 

UNTO JESUS 

and not to our position in the Chris- 
tian Church, to the family to which we 
belong, to our baptism, to the education 
which we have received, to the doctrine 
which wc profess, to the opinion which 
others have formed of our piety, or to the 
opinion which we have formed of it our- 



8 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



selves* Some of those who have prophesied 
in the Name of the Lord Jesus will one day 
hear Him say: "I never knew you" (Matt* 
7.-22, 23); but He will confess before His 
Father and before His angels even the most 
humble of those who have looked unto Him. 



— UNTO JESUS 

and not to our brethren, 

not even to the best among them and the 
best beloved- In following a man we run 
the risk of losing our way ; in following 
Jesus we are sure of never - losing our way. 
Besides, in putting a man between Jesus 
and ourselves, it will come to pass that in- 
sensibly the man will increase and Jesus 
will decrease ; soon we no longer know 
how to find Jesus when we cannot find the 
man, . and if he fails us, all fails. On the 
contrary, if Jesus is kept between us and 
our closest friend, our attachment to the 
person will be at the same time less en- 
thralling and more deep ; less passionate 
and more tender; less necessary, and more 
useful ; an instrument of rich blessing in 
the hands of God when He is pleased to 
make use of him; and whose absence will 
be a further blessing, when it may please 
God to dispense with him, to draw us 



I 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 9 

even nearer to the only Friend who can be 
separated from us by "neither death nor 
life". (Rom. 8:38-39.) 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at His enemies or at our 
own. In place of hating them and fearing 
them, we shall then know how to love them 
and to overcome them. 

jii 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at the obstacles which meet 
us in our path. As soon as we stop to 
consider them, they amaze us, they confuse 
us, they overwhelm us, incapable as we are 
of understanding either the reason why they 
arc permitted, or the means by which we 
may overcome them. The apostle began to 
sink as soon as he turned to look at the 
waves tossed by the storm; it was while he 
was looking at Jesus that he walked on the 
waters as on a rock. The more difficult our 
task, the more terrifying our temptations, 
the more essential it is that wc look only at 
Jesus. 



10 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



UNTO JESUS 

and not at our troubles, 

to count up their number, to reckon their 
weight, to find perhaps a certain strange 
satisfaction in tasting their bitterness. Apart 
from Jesus trouble does not sanctify, it hard- 
ens or- it crushes. It produces not patience, 
but rebellion; not sympathy, but selfishness; 
not hope (Rom. 5:3) but despair- It is 
only under the shadow of the cross that we 
can appreciate the true weight of our own 
cross, and accept it each day from His hand, 
to carry- it with love, with gratitude, with 
joy ; and find in it for ourselves and for 
others a source of blessings. 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at the dearest, 

the most legitimate of our earthly joys, lest 
we be so engrossed in them that they deprive 
us of the sight of the very One Who gives 
them to us. If we arc looking at Him first 
of all, then it is from Him we receive these 
good things, made a thousand times more 
precious because we possess them as gifts 
from His loving hand, which we entrust to 
His keeping, to enjoy them in communion 
with Him, and to use them for His glory. 






1 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 11 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at the instruments, 

-whatever they may be which He employs 
to form the path which He has appointed 
for us. Looking beyond man, beyond cir- 
cumstances, beyond the thousand causes so 
rightly called secondary, let us ascend as far 
as the first cause, — His will: let us ascend 
even to the source of this very will, — His 
love. Then our gratitude, without being less 
lively towards those who do us good, will 
not stop at them; then in the testing day^ 
under the, most unexpected blow, die most 
inexplicable, the most overwhelming, we 
can say 'with the Psalmist: **I was dumb, 
I opened not my mouth, because Thou didst 
it", (Ps. Sp^P') And in the silence of our 
dumb sorrow the heavenly voice will gentl/' 
reply: "What I do thou_knowest not now; 
but thou shalt know hereafter*** (John 13:7*) 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at the interests, 

of our cause, of our party, of our church, 
— still less at our personal interests. The 
single object of our life is the glory of God ; 
if we do not make it the supreme goal of 
our efforts, we must deprive ourselves of 



\ 



12 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



His help, for His grace is only at the service 
of His glory. If, on the contrary, it is His 
glory that we seek above all, we can always 
count on His grace. 

UNTO JESUS 

and hot at the sincerity of our inten- 
tions, and at the strength of our resolutions. 
Alas! how often the most excellent intentions 
have only prepared the way for the most 
humiliating falls. Let us stay ourselves, not 
on our intentions, but on- His love; not on 
our resolutions, but on His promise 1 

UNTO JESUS 

and not atrbur strength. 

Our strength is good only to glorify our- 
selves; to glorify God one must have the 
strength of God. 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at our weakness. 

By lamenting our weakness have we ever 
become more strong? Let us look to Jesus, 
and His strength^ will communicate itself to 
our hearts, His praise will break forth from 
our lips. 



r 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 13 



UNTO JESUS 

and not at our sins, 

* neither at the source from which they come 

\ (Matt* 15:19) nor the chastisement which 

they deserve. Let us look at ourselves, only 
J to recognize how much need we have of 

looking to Him; and looking to Him, ccr- 
. tainly not as if we were sinless; but on the 

contrary,^ because we are sinners, measuring 
i the, very greatness of the offence by the 

greatness of the sacrifice which has atoned 
^ for it, and of the, grace which pardons it- 
"For one look that we turn on ourselves", 
said an eminent servant of God (McCheyne) 
"let us turn ten upon Jesus". — "If it A is 
very sure" said Vinct, "that one will not 
lose sight of his wretched state by looking at 
Jesus Christ crucified — because this wretched 
state is, as it were, graven upon the cross — 
it is also very sure that in looking at one's 
wretchedness one can lose sight of Jesus 
Christ ; because the cross is not naturally 
graven upon the image of one's wretched- 
ly ness". And he adds "Look at yourselves, 
but only ,in the presence of the cross, only 
through Jesus Christ". Looking at the sin 
only gives death; looking at Jesus gives life. 
That which healed the Israelite in the. wilder- 
ness was not considering his wounds, but 



.* 



1 



14 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

raising his eyes to the serpent of brass. 
(Num. 2i : p.) 



« i 






UNTO JESUS \ 

and not — do we need to say it? — I 

at our pretence of righteousness.. Ill above .. _j 
all who are ill is he who believes himself * 

In health ; blind above the blind he who 
thinks that he sees (John 9:41). If it is 
dangerous to look long at our wretchedness 
which, is, alas! too real; it is much more 
dangerous to rest complacently on imaginary 
merits. 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at the law* j 

The law 1 gives commands, and gives no | 

strength to carry them out; the law always 
condemns, and never pardons* If wc put 
ourselves back under the law, we take our- 
selves away from grace. In so far as we 
make our obedience the means of our salva- 
tion, we lose our peace, our joy, our strength; ^l 
for we have forgotten that Jesus is the end 
of the law for righteousness to every one 
that belicveth. (Rom. 10:4.) As soon as 
the law has constrained us to seek in Him 
our only Saviour, then also to Him only 



ii 



1 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 15 



belongs the right to command our obedience; 
an obedience which includes nothing less 
than our whole heart, and our most secret 
L, thoughts, but which has ceased from being 

| an iron yoke, and an insupportable burden, 

'■■i to become an easy yoke and a light burden. 

J (Matt. 11:30.) An obedience which He 

j^ makes as delightful as it is binding, an 

f obedience which He- inspires, at the same 

time as He requires it, and which in very 
truth, is less a consequence of our salvation 
than it is a part of this very salvation, — 
and, like all the rest, a free gift. 



1 1, 



U 



UNTO JESUS 

I and hot at what we are doing for 

Him. 

1 Too much occupied with our work, we can 

I forget our Master, — it is possible to have 
the hands full and the heart empty. When 

t- occupied with our Master, we cannot forget 

* our work ; i£ the heart is filled with His 

'; love, how can the hands fail to be active in 

^ His service? 



UNTO JESUS 

and not to the apparent success of 
our efforts- The apparent success is not the 



16 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

measure of the real success ; and besides, 
God has not told us to succeed, but to work ; 
it is of our work that He requires an account, 
and not of our success, — why then concern 
ourselves with it? It is for us to scatter 
the seed, for God to gather the fruit ; if 
not today, then it will be tomorrow;. if He 
does not employ us to gather it, then He 
will employ others. Even when success is 
granted to us, it is always dangerous to fix 
our attention on it: on the one hand we 
arc tempted to take some of the credit of 
it to ourselves; on the other hand wc thus 
accustom ourselves to abate our zeal when 
we cease to perceive its result, that is to say, 
at the very time when wc should redouble 
our energy. To look at* the success is to 
walk by sight; to look at Jesus, and to per- 
severe in following Him and serving Him, 
in spite of all discouragements, is to walk 
by faith. 

UNTO JESUS 

and not to the spiritual gifts which 
we have already received, or which we are* 
now receiving from Him. As to yesterday *s 
grace, it has passed with yesterday *s work; 
we can no longer make use of it, we should 






j 
,1 



/ 

I 

i 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 17 



no longer linger over it. As to today's grace 
given for today's work, it is entrusted to us, 
not to be looked at, but to be used. We are 
not to gloat over it as a treasure, counting 
up our riches, but to spend it immediately, 
and remain poor, "Looking unto Jesus". 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at the amount o£ sorrow that 
1 our sins make us experience, or the amount 

j of humiliation which they produce in us. 

|f If only we are humiliated by them enough 

( to make us no longer complacent with our- 

selves ; if only we are troubled by them 
enough to make us look to Jesus, so that 
j He may deliver us from them, that is all 

{ that He asks from us; and it is also this 

look which more than anything else will 
1 make our tears spring and our pride fall. 

*^ And when it is given to us as to Peter, to 

; weep bitterly (Lu\e 22:62) Oh! then may 

K our teardimmed eyes remain more than ever 

directed unto Jesus; for even our repentance 
will become a snare to us, if we think to 
blot out in some measure by our tears those 
sins which nothing can blot out, except the 
blood of the Lamb of God. 



18 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



UJNTO JESUS 

and not at the brightness o£ our joy, 
the strength of our assurance, or the warmth, 
o£ our love. Otherwise, when for a little j 

time this love seems to have grown ^ cold, 
this -assurance to have vanished, this joy to 

have failed us-^either as the result of our 

own faithlessness, or for the trial of our faith 
—immediately, having lost our feelings, we 
think that we have lost our strength, and 
we allow ourselves to fall into an abyss of 
sorrow, even into cowardly idleness, or per- 
haps sinful complaints. Ah! rather let us 
remember that if the feelings with their 
sweetness, are absent, the faith with its 
strength remains with us. To be able al- 
ways to be "abounding in the work of the 
Lord 1 * (z Cor. 15:58) let us look steadily, 
not at our ever changeful hearts, but at Jesus, 
who is always the same. 

UNTO JESUS t 

and not at the heights of holiness to ( 

which we have attained. If no one may j 

believe himself a child of God so long as he 
still finds stains in his heart, and stumblings 
in his life, who could taste the joy of sal- 
vation? But this joy is not bought with a 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 10 



price. Holiness is the fruit, not the root 
of our redemption. It is the work of Jesus 
Christ for us which reconciles us unto God; 
it is the work of the Holy Spirit in us 
which renews us in His likeness.. The short- 
comings of a faith which -is true, but not 
yet fully established, and bearing but little 
fruit, in no way lessens, the fulness of the 
perfect work of the Saviour, nor the certainty 
of His unchanging promise, guaranteeing 
life eternal unto whomsoever trusts in Him. 
And so to rest in the Redeemer is the true 
way to obey Him ; and it is only when 
enjoying the peace of forgiveness that the 
soul is strong for the conflict.^— If there arc, 
any who abuse this blessed truth by giving 
themselves^ over unscrupulously to spiritual 
idleness, imagining that they can let the 
faith which they, think they have take the 
place of the holiness which they have not, 
they should remember this solemn warning 
^- of the Apostle Paul, "They that are Christ's 

1 have crucified the flesh with the affections 

and lusts" (Gal. 5:24) and that of the 
Apostle John, "He that, saith I know Him, 
and keepeth not His commandments, is a 
liar, and the truth is not in him** (1 John 
2:4) and that of the Lord Jesus Himself, 
"Evcrv tree, that bringcth not forth good 



i ■ 

It : 

I-- 

l- 

t ■ 

r 



20 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire". 
(Matt. y:ig.) 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at our defeats or victories. 
If we look at our defeats we shall be cast 

down; if wejook at our victories wc shall .. 

"* be puffed up. And neither will help us to 
fight the good fight of faith (i Tim. 6:12). j 

Like all our blessings, the victory, with the 
faith which wins it, is the gift of God 
through our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Cor. 
z 5-57) and to Him is all the glory. 

UNTO JESUS 

and not at our doubts. 

The more we look at them the larger they 
appear, until they can swallow up all our 
faith, our strength, and our joy. But if wc 
look away from them to our Lord Jesus, 
Who is the Truth (John 14:6) the doubts 
will scatter in the light of His presence like 
clouds before the sun. 

UNTO JESUS 

and ndt at our faith. 

The last device of the adversary, when he 
cannot make us look elsewhere, is to turn * 
our eyes from our Saviour to our faith, and 



^. 



' i 



III 





i: 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 21 



thus to discourage us if .it is weak/ to fill 
us with pride if it is strong: and either 
way to weaken us. For power does not 
come from the faith, but from the Saviour 
by faith. It is not looking at our faith, it 
is "looking unto Jesus". 



UNTO JESUS 

* and it is from Him and in Him 

that we learn to know, not only without 

> danger, but for the well-being of our souls, 

what it is good for us to know about the 
world and about ourselves, our sorrows and 
our. dangers, our . resources and our victories: 
seeing everything in its true light, because 
it is He who shows them to, us, and that 
only at the time and in the proportion in 
which this knowledge will produce in us 
the fruits of humility and wisdom, gratitude 
and courage; watchfulness and prayer. All 
that it is desirable for us to know, the Lord 
Jesus will teach us ; all that we do not learn 
from Him, it is better for us not to know. 

LOOKING UNTO JESUS 

as long as we remain on the earth, — 
unto Jesus from moment to moment, with-- 
out allowing ourselves to be distracted by 



*22 LOOKING UNTO JESUS 



memories of a past which we should leave 
behind us, nor by occupation with a future 
of which wc know nothing. 

UNTO JESUS NOW, 

if we have never' looked unto Him, — 
UNTO JESUS AFRESH, 

if^ we have^eased" doing so, — 
UNTO JESUS ONLY, 
UNTO JESUS STILL, 
UNTO JESUS ALWAYS,— 

?****> a S? 2C m ore and more constant, . 
more and more confident, "changed into the 
same image from glory to glory" (2. Cor. 
3:18) and thus awaiting the hour when he 
will call us to pass from earth to Heaven, 
and from time to eternity, — 

The promised hour, 
the blessed hour 

when at last "we shall be like Him, for wc 
shall see Him as He is" (1 Jno. 3:2). 



o< 



1 



1 

> 1 



LOOKING UNTO JESUS 23 



NONE OF SELF AND ALL OF THEE 

Oh, the bitter pain and sorrow 

That a time could ever be 
When I proudly said to Jesus — 
[ "All of self and none of Thee." 

j Yet He found me; I beheld Him 

Bleeding on th' accursed tree; 
And my wistful heart said faintly, 
I "Some of self and some of Thee." 

Day by day His tender mercy, 

Healing, helping, full and free, 
Brought me lower, while I whispered — I 

"Less of self, and more of Thee!" 

Higher than the highest heavens, 

Deeper than the deepest sea, 
"Lord, Thy love at last has conquered: 

None of self and ALL of Thee!" 

— Theoix>re Monod. 



24 



FAITH 
Without faith it is impossible to please God. 
(Heb. 11:6). "Faith has the twofold power, 
first of making the unseen real; and second, 
of receiving the grace and strength of God 
into the heart. Faith — we cannot say it too 
often-— is the -direct vision^ of the souir'It 



doesn't reason, it doesn't ask for evidences, * 

it doesn't seek the corroboration of the spies 
sent forward to explore the land. It is to the 
spiritual world what the five senses are to 
things around us. It is even more than this; 
M it is our power of deriving the help of the 
Unseen to carry out and complete the work 
of our life. Faith's watchword is — God is 
able. There is no kind of need, trial, perse- 
cution, experience, for which faith is not the 
sufficient answer. It is the master key for 
every lock of difficulty." — Dr. F. B. Meyer 

How do we receive faith? The Bible says; — 
So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing 
by the word of God. (Rom. 10:17). Mr. D. L. 
Moody said he received greater faith simply j 

by reading God's word. { 

Do we lack faith? — the remedy is simple, i 

read God's word. Men and women of great { 

faith are those who constantly feed their * 

souls on the bread of life — God's word. f 



T 

# 1 



All May he Saved No<tu 

"For whosoever shall call upon the name of the 
Lord shall be saved/* — Romans 10:I3. 

X *'For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that 

I not of yourselves; it is the gift of God: not of 

i works, lest any man should boast."* 

y —Ephtsians £:S-9. 

f "For God so loved the world that he gave his only 

; begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him 

* should not perish, but have everlasting life/' 

-^-John 3:16. 

Assurance as a Believer 

"That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the 
Lord Jesus, and shalt believe, in thine heart 
that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou 
.shalt be saved. For with the heart man be- 
lieveth unto righteousness: and with the mouth 
confession is made unto salvation.** 

— : Romans 10:9-1 O* 

••Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace 
with God through our Lord Jesus Christ." 

— Roma ns 5:1. 

••But if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we 
A have fellowship one with another, and the blood 

V of Jesus Christ His Son deanseth us from all 

sin/* — * John lz7. 

•'Verily, Verily, I say unto you, he that heareth my 
word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath 
everlasting life, and shall not come into con- 
demnation; but is passed from death unto life." 

— John 6:24- 






A 

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-pV- Juse7, 1863 

(Vrec- 69 6, 2 - Wa 7 7 — 37 3^ 

Miss I I 

408 Bvrnes Dri ve g //k(/ //£/£ 



San Antonio, Texas 

i f - — 



Dear Miss 



Upon my return to the city, I read your 
letter to Miss Gandy which was received at the FBI on 
May 28th. 

In response to your request, I have auto- 
graphed your copy ofr ^asters of Deceit" and am returning 
itto you under separate cover. *~* 

Sincerely yours, 

'&■ Edgafr Hoover 



1 r San Antonio (94-343) 
Reurairtel 6-4-63 



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Tolson «. 
Belmont « 

Mohr 

Casper -^. 
Callahan _ 
Conrad __. 
DeLoacK- 
Evans _ 
Gale _ 
Rosen , 



NOTE; Miss | |was sent a letter over Miss Candy's signature pn 

5-31 -63 expr essing appreciation f^^othi iu x^ u^ the Director/for *$ <Ji< r** J i 



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tnatnii 



i 



prayers. An airtel was sent SAC, San Antonio on 5-31-63 



appropriate background information. S AC, San Ahtonio->advised 
fh$ng»»Brogat6ry was located and that Miss l ~l has a»gjx>d 
reputation. She is considered as a rabid anticommuhist ancfcyery 
prq-gijaejrican. SAC recommended complying with her request :, ^ 

' W . _ v.. " ■ ■ S ; ' 








Trotter 

Tele. Roorn^ . 
Holmes _ 
Gancfy, _-. 




MAIL ROOM CZ) TELETYPE UNIT CZD 



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FD-36.(Rev. 12-13-56) 



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F BI 



Date: 6A/63 



Transmit the following in 
AIRTEL 



PT.ATTJ fPVT 



Via, 



(Type in plain' text or code) 

AIRMAIL 



(Priority or Method of Mailing) 



/ 



TO: 

FROM: 

RE: 



DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, SAN ANTONIO (94-343) (RUC) 



#ISS 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS * 

RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS) 

BUDED 6 7,5/6 3 

Re Bureau airtel 5731/63. 



b6 

b7C 



i related that she 

operates the Liberty Bell Book Store at 210 8 North Main 
Avenue. She further advised that she sent the Director 1 s 
book Masters, of Deceit to the graduating class of Thomas 
Jefferson tfxgh School in San Antonio and that the books 
were purchased through a group of women known as Patriot 
Education Committer. 

Records, Retail Me rchants Associ ation^ checked on 
6/3/63 and reflect that Miss | | came to San 

Antonio from Houston, Texas, in 1948 and was placed on record 
by the .Retail Merchants Association in August of 1948 and has 
continuously resided at 406 Byrnes. Record indicates that 
she was born in I l and in 194^8 and 1949 was employed by 
the Veteran's Administration , in 195/4 w^s an employee at 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and in 1959 was an employee of the 
Internal Revenue Service. Credit rating satisfactory. 






<?- 



Bureau 
^2. - San Antonio 
CBJ/dte 

(S) refc 



San Antonio Police Department has no record. ^ 

R fC- ,68 bJi -fa y2.77- « ' 3 ^ 



Approved: 




$k/ : • ^^ m 



Special Agent in Charge 



Sent 



-M^ Per _ 




£**«/'' 



./*♦* 







6 



SA 94-3^3 



iGroun Supervisor. 

Supervisor 



On 6/4/63 ^ 

Internal Revenue Service,, and 

of Intelligence Division, Internal Revenue Service, 434 
South Main „ advised that they were acquainted with Miss 
I I ra ring her employment with Internal Revenue. 

related s he work ed \mder his supervision. Both 



he 

hlC 



advised that Hiss 
and intelligent, 



was a good employee, stable, 
Both advised that sh e was a r abid 



anti -commun ist and very pro-American; 



Viiisp[ 



j 



] resigned of &e;r own accord and opened the 



stated that 



Liberty Bell Book Btore on Main Avejme where, she sold patriotic 
books and publications. He stated that she was with. Internal 
Rev&B&e. from 1957 to early- 19,62. Neither knew of anything 
ag.ainst her. 

Recommend Bureau comply with, request. 



r- 2 



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•7/ 



June 7, 1963 

^ 



Mr. 

Post Office Box 202 

TSethayres, Pennsylvania 



+mfMf Mm m m i T * W » m 



wiiwi» imwLwwfc 



Dear Mr. 



Your letter postmarked June 4th 
was received as Mr. Hoover was preparing to 
leave the city. He asked me to thank you for 
your comment concerning "Masters of Deceit" 
and to advise you that since your questions deal 
with legal matters, you should seek the advice 
of an attorney of your own. choice. 

Sincerely yours, 



50 

m 
o 



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TO 33 



cr> 



Tolson _ 
Belmont . 

Casper . 
Callahan , 
Conrad _ 
DeLoach . 
Evans __ 



Mfitm> 5 



ty 



'JIK-.719S8 




1 "'u -U'wrns; 



Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 



NOTE: Correspondent cannot be identified in Bufiles. 

JH:alk aj*^ 
(3) *^ 



Gale 

Rosen ._ 

Sullivan 

Tavel . 

Trotter 

Tele. Room »,-.., t& 
Holmes _$JL-I?" 
Gandy 



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MAIL BOOM (Z3 TELETYPE UNIT CD 








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TRUE COPY 



Dear Sir, 

If it won't trouble you very much 
I would very much like to have a list of the rights 
of people under 21 yrs. of age. 

Particularly haveing to do with 
their rights concerning weapons, ammo, etc. and 
their rights to trials. What is a hVbeas corpus? 

Sincerly, 

I 1 

P.O. Bqx-202 Betharyes, Penna. 
P. S. I read and enjoyed Masters of Deciet 



Address per envelope: 



P.O.Box, 202 
Betharyes Penna. 




v 



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%|» E JUN}# 1963 



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Information and Publications Office 







June 6, 1963 



Dear Miss Gandy: 

Pursuant to our telephone conservation of June 3* 
^ Miss Harrington and I are forwarding to yoygQvia the 
^Library's truck, two copies of\Mr. Hoover's Masters of 
^Deceit* 

*CC Whenever it is convenient for you to do so we shall 
-->»>e -Very grateful if you will ask him to inscribe these 
^fedks^^^Ke ^ersojas named on the slips attached to the 

■l^** If >you wa.ijcindly call me on Code 1?^,- ext. ^81 . 
Vr 203 , when, the bboEs^iay.eJbeen inscribed^ I shall 
be glad to make arrangements^^ 






■"■"WWUJWpiBS 









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REC- 6S[ ^ ! *-** p 

. e JUN 11 1963 






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JUN 1 4 19.G 




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' y-tf*JWH»»«*Mfr»« rWtfa** ^°« H^ <* mj*< m.».<i m l m* **ii *+ > m s x p r ** l ,.,ix *m H)l *~ mm * a» m w* * tn**->m--K?* 



Hiss 




copy °* ni 



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Please ask Mr. Hoover to inscribe this copy of his ' 



book to my brother, Capt. Paul H^CHarrington 



, who v 



1 ffc&iarri 

recently retired from the U. S.-N avv after 3$) years 1 
service, and who; is. a. great admirer of the Director 
ofthePBI. ... ^J^ 



be 

b7C 







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™— '*.«\* 




*&~\o>tf??. 



1963 






^L 



MrsJ "2 M' 

Anartmont^nn 

727 East Orange Grove Boulevard 
"^aspenaTl^nror^r^^ 



ft*, 





Dear Mrs~ 

Upon my .return to the city, I read your 
letter of May 29th and want to thank you for your kind 
remarks on the occasion of my Anniversary as Director 
of the FBI. The warm sentiments you expressed are 
deeply appreciated. 

With respect to your request, we 'have no 
supply of "Masters of Deceit" here at FBI headquarters. 
If you will send a copy to me, I will autograph it for you. 

Sincerely yours, 

d- Edgar Hoover 



2, 









Y*& 



1 - Los Angeles (94-il66) 
Reurairtel 6/7/63 



\/ $& 






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NOtE: Since BUfifes contained no references identifiable- with correspondent, 
,she was sent an in-absence form reply onJ3/5/63 and the fifeid was, instructed 
to make appropriate inquiries by airtel bf *tne. same. date. g&C bos Angeles 
advised nothing derogatory was located ■, and he recommended complying 
with the, request. '"'',''_ 



Mohr. 



18 ^w > 



Cas*per_ 
Callahan . 



Compdt _1_ 
DeLoachC 
Evans _ 

Gale _ 

* Rosen *^_ 



in (4) 

z rmW A 



Sullivan " ** 
Tavel ffj f*° 

Tele. iftlZ 
Holmes _. 
Gandy - 



31! 



$■ 



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MAIL ROOM 



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TELETYPE UNIT 



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AIRTEL 



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FBI 






Date: 


6/7/63 




PLAIN TEXT; 






(Type in plain text or code) 




AIR MAIL 






(Priority 


or Method of Mailing) 








11 



TO: 
FROM: 
RE: ' 



DIRECTOR, FBI" ; 

SAC, LOS ANGELES (94-1166) J|J\, cl&f* 

Mrs. I I aka 



T 




fece 



;+ 



Pasadena, California 

Attention : Research, Correspondence, 

and Tours ., 



Re Bureau Airtel to Los Angeles, 6/5/63. 

Records, Retail Merchants'- Credit Association, 
Lbs Angeles PD, and Los Angeles Sheriff's Office, Los Ange 
checked this date with negative results. 

Pasadena Retail Merchants Association and records 
Pasadena PD negative. Los Angeles Office indices negative. 




Pasadena n.itv Directory reflects Mrs. 



] as 



widow of I I City directories back to 1951 show 

same information ana was widow at that time. Residences as 
stated verified. 

As there is no. reason to preclude compliance with 
her request, recommend Bureau comply. 



<?: 



^.M$ HE0 52 



- Bureau * . 

Los Angeles ^/M^ 

JAN:ML fl J ^ifi 

(4) « > ^ 

8 



a^w^h^ji737 

y^S 1 1 1 1 1, 1 , ninifT- t *nm&&£a f 







lO'JUN 3^1963 



P-. 




bo 
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^f ^^a/JlAfiy^. 



Special Agent in Charge 



Sent 



8-^3 (*m># 2V^ *; 




T&nsmit the following '" „• ., ^ X } ^Q ,. - J - 

4 




<(Type in plain text or code.) 



'' - Mia J 



Airtel -'- 



.(Priority or Method of Mailing) 



1 



To: SAC, Newark . , . 

From: 'Director, FBI , ■ , 

MJZABETHC. HOAR. JE RSEY CITY, N&W JER3EY 

NEWARK* NSW JERSEY 



•RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS)' - - ' ' 

Enclosed, you will- .find:, ^ _ . . * _ _ 

E3 Two copies, oLself-expHanqtpry communication from ^captioned individual. -" 
"~rr\ - f*TOne copy of ihe-EiBrLaw Enforcement-Bulletin.* - _ - 
lZ* €3 O ne copy v bf the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin. ^ 

T - £* QPthen .__ "-''"'.* V ^ '- -" 

^Take following action: " - _,- 

^ O'Make discreet inquiries of established source's to determine reputation, of 
£v captioned individual* arid/or organization^. Under no circumstances jsh.oukK- 
--."-; ^7 * corre u spon,dentbecome aware of our interest. - . 

"V - <fel Have -correspondent interviewed to determine whether cqrre$po,nd_enjshas£g|' 
^ any information pf interest to, Bureau. , - ri * 

'= QHave substance-of enclosed ^communication made^aydilable to v appraptiq£es?^ 

',_• " lpqql law ^enforcement of ficials. "Retain copies^oCthis communication in 



you? possession at alitiMes. 



m 



ro 



^JLEQ 30 



« f 



(\l 



Acknowledge enclosed communication, by ^mailing enclosed Burecra*pi§|lH 
:ation or- publications, to* correspondent to address indicated, follpwH^ -^g 



u> 



^^Hl. 4fQfiQ /y° u ? determination of status in law enforcement. If corespondent is i§t 



JSfeffil 



^ 
*>■* 



ftype oi person, to whom we want to furnish this- material, or does not h<&e 
[ Jegitimat^ interest in daw enforcement matters, t correspondent should be 
contacted arid infprmedl4hdt our budgetary limitations irestricMts distri- 
bution and 'request ^cannot be granted.- Advise* Bureau of; action taken,, 
together: with recommendation as Jo whether correspondent's -name should , ^§J- 
be^ .added to our mailing: list. "" - -- - ^ 

,n Submit results under .above caption" to reach Bureau no later than J^. 



<J> 



..fr- 



V** 



/ 



[ 



1 Tolso t _, 
Beln&c it - 

| Cdsp j- — 

]LCalIqhan\ 

CbnratJ ^ 

. BeLoach . 

:- Gale w_ 
Roseb .__ 
SuHtyan _ 
Tave) ., 



— s^ Q Other: 

"Erretosure fl. (2) * 



E7l Submijt Jesuits, and recommendations as to whether or not Bureau should ^ ^^ 

^ comply with request, under above' caption, to reach Bureau no laten than^ 6~19*y3«» 

-■•--■- ; r> ^^> 






Y^J^rA **%> 



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,"si: 



RVA:ni^(6) , 









Gandy ^ 



- _'Mi Per __i L. 



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Airtel to SAC,- Newark 
Re: ELIZABETH C. HOAR, 



Bufiles contain no references, identifiable with Miss Hoar. 
Make discreet inquiries of established sources to determine, her reputation. 
Under no circumstances should she become aware of our interest. -- 



| s a former Special Agent, EOD 11-3-47* resigned 5-20-54 
services satisfactory. , Ov6rali-relationi have been cordial, but ,you shbuld 
review your files to determine Current relationship. * b^ 



ROTE: In June, 1962, we had a rriisuhder standing -mth| | over the 

submission of Identification name;checks. The matter,, however, was resolved 
by correspondence^ Bufiles indicate no contact since that time.., 1 " * 




-2- 



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ARTHUR J. SILLS 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY 

DIVISION OF LAW 
BUREAU OF SECURITIES 

744 BROAD STREET 
NEWARK 2, NEW JERSEY p-» 

MARKET 3*7688 



June 11, 1963 



THEODORE I. BOTTER j 

First Assistant attorney general \ 

DAVID F. CON ROY 
~ E ** Chief 




Honorable J. Edgar Hoover 
Chief, Federal Bureau of 

Investigation 
Washington, D # C # 



Dear Mr. Hoover: 



Mr. Callahan 

Mr. ConriuiK...,.,. | 
Mr. J)<ihWm^r ~ 
Mr. Evaris^2_ 
Mr. Gftle 



Mr. Jlosen 

Mr. Sullivan.. 

Mr. Tavcl.— . 
Mr. Trotter.™ 
tele. £oc:n : 

,S£:ss Gandy^. 

C " 



Stss 



**^ 



I was recently honored by being invited/ as aT 
guest, to a Testimonial for a Miss Elizabeth C. Hoar who 
was retiring after 50 years as a member of the Board of 
Education of Jersey City. 

Most of Miss Hoar r s tenure was as a Principal 
of a grammar school. Many of her assignments were in the 
handling of children of broken families, emotionally --* 
disturbed and potential " juvenile 'delinquents" # 

She has been, and continues to be, one of your 
greatest admirers, and has always had the greatest respect 
and admiration for the Bureau. On the occasion of her ' 
retirement, she asked me if I would be good enough, on my 
next trip to Washin^on, to personally request you to 





'to one of our most important professions speaks for itself. 
She would consider it a great, honor if you^i would Tii^f ill 
this request. Since I am well awar,e of your'Very busy 
schedule, and uncertain' of ifiy own,*! thought that this would 
.a. — nzfelr^ In which to fulfill Miss Hoar's request. 




w# 



RECfc® &3.-I) 



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s>/" 






1963 




, faCET / 



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JP 



-2- 



""■'Ift-M'TW HimiUmWiMHili 



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\ • 



She has, suggested, if you see fit, the 
following inscription: 




"June, 1963~To:-Miss Elizabeth C^vHoar 
with best wishes from One American, to 
another-- signed: J. Edgar Hoover". 

If you care to return the book to me, I will 
see that she receives it. However, if you care to forward 
it directly to her the address is 10 Huron Avenue, Jersey 
City 6, New Jersey 9 Apartment 4H # "" ■■■■■ * 



Thank you for your anticipated cooperation and 
your anticipated consideration of this request and again 
be assured of my continued cooperation in matters of mutual 
interest . 

Kindest personal regards — 



Sincerely yours, 



C/t 



he ' 
hie 
, i 






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4' < • -V 



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ob 



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Koom t>07, 744 Broad Street 
Newark 2; rfew-Jers 




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■V*^ OPTIC 



OPTIONAL P5RM NO. 10 



J UNITED STATES GO^a 



INMENT 



lO:" f*^ 



Memorandum 



v: 



TO 



FROM 



subject: 



DIRECTOR, FBI 




date: 6/6/63 j 



t^ 



BALTIMORE (9^-382) C 



HOWARD EAROW 
Assistalr£„Superintende.Dfc 
S tater of , Delaware„Dep ,aiLtmervb 
^^Puffl i'c Instruc t ipp mmm 
Researcn Xtnc r im'e ,, Recbrds - 



^p ^jauJctr^ 



Re Baltimore letter to Bureau dated 5/6/63'; 

Enclosed fo': 
b " The^Chai: 
were furnished by Br. ROW on 5/27/63. 



^iXj 



Enclosed for the Bureau are two copies of Dr. ROW'S 
manuscript. " TheTfchallenge of our Times".. These copies 




<- Bureau (Enc. 2) 
f /L - Baltimore 
PLP:dgr 




1/ 










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EX-115. tA- io±slU{1-^ 



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EMCLOSOEB 






■.m^.,-,, .■m.ISj.-,,^,, 




STATE OF OJSr.A^WAStE 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCT 

GEORGE R_ MILLER, JR., State Superintendent 



^"idk* 



3 






E> E A/l OIC RWGY 



s O MMUNI f SYA 1 . 



:<* 






'^sCt* 



i *' 



KOWA.HO EL .ROW, Assistant Superintendent 



-0 



& * 



\ 



AUTHORSHIP - ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

This publication is presented under the direction of the Delaware State 
Department of Public Instruction* and has no single author. It must be 
obvious, however, that such a document cannot be writt en b y an entire 
committee of fifteen persons. " 

The Committee on the Study of Materials for Teaching About Com- ^' 

munism was responsible for the general policy concerning the direction 
of the document. The chairman of the committee was responsible for 
the administrative detail of implementing that policy. 



\ 

1 1 



The first major assignment of the total committee was to determine 
the general educational and philosophical direction that the document should 
take. Initial written presentations, setting forth the main principles to 
be involved, were made by: Dr. Marshall Knappen, Dr. David H. Shelton, 
Jr., J. Hershey Keene and Dr. H. L. Klopping. 

The first draft of the teaching outline was prepared by Miss Dorothy 
Allen, Mr. J. Hershey Keene, Mr. James Owen and Mr. Matthew Sullivan. 
These persons were given two days of release time from their public 
school assignments under the authority of the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, and with the approval of the superintendents of their 
respective school districts. It was this outline that became the working 
paper for all future activities of the committee. If one were to single out 
authors of this document, these four persons would be so named- 

In the summer of 1962, Messrs. Keene, Owen and Sullivan were granted 

fellowships by the Delaware School Auxiliary Association to attend the *: 

Research Institute on Communist Strategy and Propaganda at the University < 

of Southern California. In this institute, a further study of the outline ; 

with the addition of the teacher and student bibliographical materials and i 

teaching helps was made. ! 



All of the work relative to the very helpful glossary was prepared 
by Dr. H. L. Klopping, whose personal background and experiences in his ^ * 

native Holland during World War II, along with his extended interest in | 

and research on the topic, eminently qualified him for such a task. 



A preliminary edition of The Challenge of Our Times \ Democracy u*\ 

Faces Communism was tried in pilot situations in seve^ junior and senior 
high schools in November, 1962. These studies were still in progress at | 

press time and will, it is hoped, serve a dual purpose: first, provide a 
testing period of the material and second, provide the basis for later case 
studies that may be of assistance to other teachers. 

4-63-1000 



f 

i 

i 



i 












f " I 1 

•l 



State of Delaware 




Department of 
Public Instruction 



THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIMES: 
I 1 DEMOCRACY FACES COMMUNISM 



A Teaching Outline 



George R, Miller, Jr. 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction 



Howard E. Row 

y\ Assistant State Superintendent, Secondary Education 

Chairman - Committee on the Study of Materials for 
Teaching About Communism 



Dover, Delaware 
1963 

Bulletin No. 30-63 



FOREWORD 



la the summer of 1961 the State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
received approval from the State Board of Education for the appointment of 
an advisory committee to designate /(l) the basic principles and^attitudes 
which should be emphasized in the teaching of patriotism and citizenship 
in the Delaware public schools and (2) the facts which should be taught 
about Communism and its threat to the American way of life. 



George R. Miller, Jr. 
State Superintendent 



ii 



~S 



This manual is the work of that advisory committee under the capable 
leadership of Dr. Howard E. Row of the State Department staff; The general <J 

and specific objectives of the materials are clearly set forth, together with 
comprehensive outlines for both teacher and pupil activities, and a most 
carefully screened bibliography. To aid further the pupil's understanding a 
valuable glossary has been added. 

There is no claim that the materials presented are either the "last word" 
or necessarily complete, which state can never be attained in these times of 
sudden and dramatic change. The contents do, however, represent the com- 
bined thinking of committee members who are particularly knowledgeable 
about democracy and the challenges of Communism and other ideologies to 
democratic tenets. Three teacher members of the committee were award- 
ed scholarships to study at the Research Institute of Communist Strategy 
and Propaganda at the University of Southern California during^the summer 
of 1962. Invaluable suggestions from these experiences arer to be found 
throughout this document. 

It is the Department's purpose that, after a trial period in certain selected 

high schools, these materials will become an integral part of the social studies 1 

program in every high school in the State. This trial approach is required j 

in order to refine the study materials through actual use. That the materials - 

cannot be introduced simultaneously into all schools is predicated upon the [ 

fact that too few teachers have adequate training in this area and few j 

training facilities are available. ; 

Certainly, this pamphlet in and of itself has no value whatsoever. Only P 

as it is used consistently and intelligently by the classroom teacher will the ! 

value of these materials become evident. And, if from the study process our 1 

boys and girls emerge with a sense of rededication to democratic ideals and . ,, 

with an alertness to and an awareness of the alternatives that are being pro- *H 

posed, the hours of study and effort put into the preparation and testing ] 
of these materials will have been well spent. 






ff 



■ ; !, 

:' } 



■V 

if- 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



j$ INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHER 

GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES „.._.„. .. 



I AMERICAN DEMOCRATIC IDEALS AND PRACTICES ^ 7 

II ORIGIN AND IDEOLOGICAL BASIS FOR MODERN 
COMMUNISM ACCORDING TO THE COMMUNISTS „ 13 

III COMPARISON OF THE CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES 

OF AMERICAN DEMOCRACY AND COMMUNISM ... 20 

IV THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE INDIVIDUAL TO 
COMBAT COMMUNISM ..____ , 26 

GLOSSARY OF COMMUNIST DOUBLE TALK __*__ 31 

BIBLIOGRAPHY ._._-^ « = ^«_ - -. .. 39 

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FILMS „ 46 



INTRODUCTION TO THE TEACHER 



The materials presented herein are intended as a suggested teaching 
outline for those teachers in Delaware who plan to present a unit or to 
enrich units in other subjects on the general subject of the challenge of 
Communism to our American democracy. 

These materials, adaptable for junior or senior high school, have been 
used in pilot situations in which the time allowance has varied from six 
weeks for a concentrated presentation in 'one instance, nine weeks for a 
short course in another, or the entire school" year for enrichment of Social 
Studies programs in still other cases. 

Each topic presented in this outline was carefully weighed for its value 
in reinforcing the American point of view or in pointing out the challenge of 
Communism. It is the feeling of the committee presenting this document 
that it includes basic materials to which modifications may be made and 
to which additions should certainly be made. 

If the unit or enrichment concerning the objectives and functions of 
Communism is presented as a part of a course in the history of the United 
States, or immediately following such a course, then the section entitled 
"Democratic Ideals and Practices" might be passed over very quickly or de- 
leted provided, however, that all of the topics in Section I, which are im- 
portant to later discussions, have been adequately studied. 



rr' 

j 
i 

•1 



?". GENERAL OBJECTIVES 



t 



si 

f» I. To reinforce our students' understanding and 

appreciation of American democracy 



<1| 

\4 



II- To educate our students to the nature of the 

Communist challenge and its possible effect 
on our lives 



IIL To educate our students to the strengths and 
weaknesses of these two conflicting systems in 
order to point out the menace of Communism and 
establish the merits of our society 



IV* To develop in the student an awareness of his 
responsibility to combat Communism using 
wi methods appropriate to our democratic ideals 



SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES 



A. To survey the personal, social, and political 

rights and responsibilities of the American 

citizen under _ the_ Constitutio n and how t hey 



4 

-J* 



came into being 

B f To emphasize the economic advantages to the 

individual in our free capitalistic economy i 

] 

II- To define the theory and aims of Communism V] 



III. A. To show how the practice of Communism 
differs from the communist theory 

B. To contrast the concepts and practices of 
daily living under the two systems 

C- To evaluate the degree to which the Commu- 
nists have succeeded in spreading their 
ideology 

D. To help students recognize the methods used 
by the Communists to achieve their end — such 
as: propaganda, infiltration, subversion, and 
force 



IV. A. To stress the fundamental importance of the 
belief in the worth and dignity, of the indi- 
vidual under the democratic system 

B. To create in the minds of the students a 
desire to practice the principles of our 
democracy J * i 

C To emphasize for the student that the Com- 
munist challenge is a fact of our day, that it i. 
will be with us for some time and that it is 
not a passing phase of this generation 

D. To make clear that every citizen as an 
individual has a responsibility actively to 
combat Communism 



t 

I. AMERICAN DEMOCRATIC IDEALS 
AND PRACTICES * 

A. Old World Beginnings 

1. The Judeo-Christian heritage 

a. Dignity and worth of the individual 

b. Social responsibility ("love thy neighbor 
as thyself") 

f- c. Freedom's dependence on knowledge 

("Know the truth, and the truth shall 
make you free") 

E2 d. The importance of women, children, and 

^ the home (family) 

e. The Mosaic law 

2. Greek philosophers and the Athenian city- 
state 

3. Roman law 

4. French and English philosophers: Locke, 
j * Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, the Mills, 

Milton 

' 5- Our British birthright 

a. The Magna Carta 

| b. Model Parliament 

c. Petition of Right and Toleration Act 

d. Habeas Corpus Act 

e. Bill of Rights 

f. Colonial charters 

B. Colonial Roots of American Democracy 

1. The Virginia House of Burgesses: colonial 
assemblies vs. royal governors 

2. The Mayflower Compact: government by 
consent of the governed 

K 3. Roger Williams and Rhode Island, the 

pi Maryland Toleration Act, the Quaker colo- 

1 1 nies: the struggle for religious liberty (The 

% ■ Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom: 

separation of cKufcli and" state) 






*$&'' 



(*) This is the content suggested for use in fulfilling 
the first objective: To reinforce our students' 
understanding and appreciation of American de- 
mocracy. 



The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut: a 

written constitution of government * 

New England town meetings and county 
government in the South: participation at 
the local level 

- The^ Old Deluder ~ Lawf^f fee, publuT educa- 
tion 



7. John Peter Zenger's trial: freedom of the 
press 

8. The Albany Plan of Union: a proposal for 
united action on a common problem 

9- The Stamp Act Congress: united action on 
a common problem 

10. The First and Second Continental Congress- 
es: drifting into democracy 

a. Jefferson and the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence 

(1) All men are created equal 

(2) They possess unalienable rights: 
life, liberty and the pursuit of 
happiness 

(3) Governments exist to secure these 
rights 

(4) Governments exist by the consent of 
the governed 

(5) People have right to change and 
replace governments which fail to 
serve these ends (cf. A. Lincoln — 
"government of the people, by the 
people, and for the people") 

b. Dickinson and the Articles of Confeder- 
ation 

11. American writers,, speakers, and philoso- 
phers: Otis, the Adamses, Henry, Dickin- 
son, Paine, Washington, Jefferson, Hamil- 
ton, Madison, Jay and Mason 

12. The Constitution of the United States: "a 
federal republic of the democratic type" 

a, Statement of purposes (preamble) 

(1) "We the people of the United 
States . ." 

(2) "form a more perfect union" 

(3) "establish justice" 

(4) "insure domestic tranquility" 

8 



. 






V- 



(5) "promote the general welfare" 

(6) "secure the blessings of liberty . ." 

b. Federal republic of limited (delegated) 
powers with remaining powers reserved 
to states or to the people; representative 
democracy rather than pure democracy; 
republican form of government guaran- 
teed to states 

c. Separation of powers and check and 
balance system designed to prevent mon- 
archy or dictatorship 

i Government of laws, not men; flexibility 
of the Constitution and the law 

e. Popular suffrage limited to choice of 
Representatives to Congress by adult, 
male, propertied electorate 

f. Rule of majority; rights of minority pro- 
tected against tyranny or majority 

g. Military establishment subordinate to 
civilian control 

h. Taxation by the peoples' representatives 
L No religious test for public office 
j, Writ of habeas corpus guaranteed 

C. Expanding Concepts of Democracy 

1. Democracy as a process for making political 
decisions: political and civil rights 

a. State constitutions rewritten and amended 

b. The Bill of Rights provides 

(1) Separation of church and state; 
freedom of religion 

(2) Freedom of speech and of the press 

(3) Right of assembly and petition for 
redress of grievances 

(4) Protection against unreasonable 
search or seizure 

(5) Trial by jury; rights of persons 
accused and/or convicted of crime 

c Other amendments provide 

(1) Citizenship by birth (or naturali- 
zation) 

(2) Protection against deprivation of life, 
liberty (involuntary servitude pro- 
hibited), or property without due 
process of law 



(3) Just compensation for property tak- 
en for public use 

(4) Equal protection under the laws 

(5) Safeguards of citizens' privileges: 
State laws may not reduce privileges 
or immunities of U, S. citizens 

(6) Right ro vote granted regardless of 
race or sex 

(7) Direct election of U, S. Senators 

d. Free, open elections using secret ballot; 
popular election of Presidential electors 

e. Development of two-party system, pri- 
maries, and national nominating conven- 
tions brings ordinary citizen closer to de- 
cision-making process ■ 

2. Democracy as a system of goals and values: 
social rights 

a. Freedom of access to information 

b. Universal education 

c. Equal opportunity for growth and de- 
velopment, the chance to achieve dis- 
tinction 

d. Freedom of choice (employment, hous- 
ing, buying, etc.) 

e. Right of special interest groups to organ- 
ize and work for private ends 

f. Right to a measure of security: against 
unemployment, sickness, or old age 

g. Freedom of movement 

D. Spread of Western Democratic Ideals in the 
New World and the Old 

1. The French and German republics; consti- 
tutional monarchy and Republic of Italy 

2. Peaceful revolution in Canada and bloody 
revolutions in Latin America 

3- The Republics of China, the Philippines, 
and India; constitutional monarchy or Japan 

4. The new African republics; Indonesia 

E. Rise of the "Peoples* Democracies": U.S.S.R., 
Eastern European satellites, Red China, Yugo- 
slavia, Cuba 

1. Differ from American democratic ideal at 
crucial points 

10 



Social goals (rights) can be achieved 
without civil or political rights 

Significant distinctions between state and 
society disappear; private associations do 
not exist; total life of community ab- 
sorbed by state ("totalitarian") 

No practical limitation (constitutional 
provisions notwithstanding) on the pow- 
er of the state or its leader 

Disregard for individual rights: man has 
no "unalienable rights" 



SUGGESTED READING (From the 
Bibliography) 

Teachers and Pupils 

Because the content in this area is based on materials 
usually taught in the regular required social studies 
courses (United States history, world history, civics, 
American government, economics, or P.O.D.) in Dela- 
ware secondary schools, no attempt is made here to sug- 
gest specific textbooks. It is assumed that materials al- 
ready available in the school will be used "by teachers 
and pupils. 

The following titles, which are listed in the bibli- 
ography because of the material they contain about Com- 
munism, also contain one or more chapters concerning 
American democratic ideals and practices. 

Colegrove, Kenneth. Democracy Versus Communism 

Ebenstein, William, Two Ways of Life: The 
Communist Challenge to 
Democracy 

Suggested Activities 

1. Take the class on a field trip to one or more of the 
historic places in which this area abounds: Dover, 
the Hagley Museum, Philadelphia and Valley Forge, 
Baltimore-Annapolis-Washington, Williamsburg. Co- 
lonial Williamsburg in particular offers special stu- 
dent tours which cover much of this material and 
are designed for either junior or senior high school 
pupils. Arrangements must be made in writing sev- 
eral weeks in advance. Rates from September to 
March are quite low. 

11 



Attend an open .meeting where some public issue is 
under consideration: 

Use recordings (phonograph or tape) and films 
available from several sources in Delaware. The fol- 
lowing tapes are also available in the Freedom Series 
from the Campus Library*: American Institutions 
^oJ^Jlfeedom^Ideologies^and^Democracy;,^ 
History, Volumes I and 1L 



Suggested Ways of Evaluating Outcomes 

1 . Have pupils prepare a notebook of clippings from A 
current newspapers illustrating American rights and # j 
responsibilities in practice. Ask them to include any 1 
violations of these rights (or neglect of responsibili- 
ties) they happen to run across. 

2. Prepare a school corridor display based on any of the 
five major parts of this outline of content or all of 

them. * 

3- Have the pupils assume that they are Richard M. 
Nixon engaged in the "Kitchen Debate" with Khru- 
shchev (see Nixon, Six Crises, available in a Cardin- 
al Edition from Pocket Books, Inc.) or a PXXW. 
interviewer in Korea talking with an American 
soldier who has been subjected to "brain- washing"; 
and ask them to prepare a defense of American de- 
mocratic ideals and practices to be used in response 
to the points which might be raised by Khrushchev 
or the P.O.W. 

4. Administer the SRA "Principles of Democracy Test/* 



(*) The Campus Library (Available from Campus 
World, Inc., 3757 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles 
5, California) 



12 



f 



II. ORIGIN AND IDEOLOGICAL 

BASIS FOR MODERN COMMU- 
NISM ACCORDING TO THE COM- 
MUNISTS * 

A. Communism in the distant past 

B. The rise of capitalist ideas to dominance 

I * C. Successes and failures of early 19th century 

capitalism 

D. The European political situation in the early 
19th century 

E. Early 19th century socialist protests 

F. Emergence of Marxism as "scientific socialism" 

1. Economic interpretation of history 

2. Dynamics, of historical change — the class 
struggle 

rf 3- Nature and basis of class struggle under 

capitalism 

[V 4, Economic exploitation under capitalism 

\\ a. Internal 

b. External — imperialism 

til 

p 5.. The ultimate collapse of capitalism de- 

| scribed in doctrine of recurrent economic 

h crisis under the capitalist system 

£, 6. Violent overthrow of the existing (Capital* 

U i istic) system 

7. Establishment of the dictatorship of the 
proletariat and of socialism and "from each 
according to his ability;^ to each in accord- 
ance with his work." These are regarded 
U as purely transitional stages 

L i 8. Establishment of Communism ("from each 

k; according to his ability, to each according 

Lt to his needs") and withering away of the 

•5 state, (pre-history ends and history begins) 



'V 



j i 



I' 

1 



(*) This is the content suggested for use in fulfilling 
the second objective: To educate our students -to 
the nature of the Communist challenge and it} 
possible effect on our lives. 

13 






x 1 



G. Post-Marx-development of communist and so- 
cialist ideas 

1. Marxism as modified by Lenin 

a. Developed practical methods of establish- 
ing Marxism (the science of conspiracy) 

_ ^b.^Replaced-the-dictatorship^of— the^prole— 

tariat by the dictatorship of the vanguard 
of the proletariat, the vanguard )>eing 
the Communist party which consists of 
fanatical professional revolutionaries 

c Organized the party on the basis of the 
principle of "Democratic Centralism" 

2. Growth of western democratic socialism 

a. Evolutionary instead of revolutionary 

b. Reliance on democratic procedures 

c. Retention of individual liberties 

*d. Emergence of mixed economies 

(1) England 

(2) Scandinavia 

3. Similarities and contrasts between Marxism- 
Leninism and democratic "Western social- 
ism" 

H. Russian Communism: Development 

11 Pre-revolutionary conditions in Russia 

2. Growth of demands for political and 
economic freedom 

3- Russia's involvement in World War I 

4. The Revolution of 1917 

5- The period of "war communism" — Bol- 
shevism's struggle for life 

6. The period of "New Economic Policy" — 
consolidation of Bolshevik control 

7- The rise of Stalin to absolute power 

8. Stalin's death /and successors — the intermit- 
tent "thaw" 

14 



# 



C> 



I. Russian Communism: Present reality* 

1. Marxism-Leninism as pseudo-religion 

a. Dogmatic acceptance of tenets 

b- Wide extension of applicability 

c. Acceptance of anything as moral which is 
consistent with Marxist-Leninist theory 

]P d. Use of remote "moral"- ends to justify 

immoral means 



5 ' 

1 






e. Opposition to other religions 

2. '* Communism as a political system 

a. Structure of Soviet Government 

b. Structure of Communist party 
c Functions of electoral process 
d. Role of the Communist Party 



;)' (1) Parallels and dominates government 

structure 

(2) Party decisions become government 
decrees 

I (3) Party membership restricted and 

* regulated '^ 

\ (4) Preparation and training for party 

\ membership long and arduous 

\ (5) Party demands unquestioning obedi- 

X ence 

r 

\ (6) Party members expected to "police" 

j rest of society 

{ (7) The collective (e. g. Communist 

Youth Organization or trade union) 
£ performs the function of "big 

k brother" 

^ e. Extension of political control to social 

M — and cultural, spheres 



(*) Be attentive to duplication or overlap between this 
item and Part I, E, Rise of "Peoples* Democracies" 
on page 10. 



X 15 






J. Communism as an economic system 

1- Merger of political and economic systems 

2. State ownership of natural resources and 
means of production 



i 



Comprehensive planning of economic ac- 
tivity 

Great emphasis on rapid growth of total 
output 

Willingness to sacrifice standard of, living 

to military ahd~ industrial potential * 

(Khrushchev's speech June 2, 1962) # 

Over-all record more successful in industrial 
and military sectors, less successful in agri- 
culture and provision of a better life for 
Russians 



K. Communism as a tyranny of state over the 
individual 

1. Individual rights exist only within^ the goals 
and procedures of Marxism-Leninism and 
are secondary in importance 

2. No right of individual is safe from capri- 
ciously conceived interest of state; consti- 
tutional guarantees are safe only when no 
conflict of individual and state is 'involved 

3. AH methods of propaganda and thought 
control are to be employed in building a 
new race of "Soviet men" 

a. Present day human nature is incompatible 
with communism. During the transitional 
stage called Socialism man must there- 
fore be re-made so that he will fit into 
the Communist system 






fr 



b- The making of communist man (a fully 
compliant and controllable number) re- 
quires molding the thinking of all people 
living in communist dominated areas, f 

through control of mass media, education, 
and censorship of news. This control is 
exerted not only over political and econo- 
mic matters but over all facets of 
life; for example, science, religion and 
art 

16 



4, Freedom of thought and access to outside 
information occasionally permitted but not 
considered a right 

Communism as a world-wide challenge 

1. Spread of Communism to Eastern Europe 
and the Balkans 

2. Spread of Communism to China 

3. Spread of Communism to Cuba 

4. Communism actively threatens all other 
countries 

a. Communist parties organized in almost 
every nation 

(1) Openly or underground where out- 
lawed 

(2) Owe full allegiance to Moscow (or 
Peiping) 

(3) Work for universal Communist sys- 
tem as directed from Communist 
power centers 

b. Russian policy aimed at attracting ad- 
herents abroad especially in underde- 
veloped nations 

(1) Propagandists publicizing of rapid 
Russian economic, military and 
technological progress 

(2) Skillful use of ideological appeal of 
Marxism-Leninism 

(3) Exploitation of issues of "colonial- 
ism" and race prejudice 

(4) Encouragement of internal strife and 
revolution 

(5) Use of trade and economic aid as 
political weapons 

c Free resort to subversion within other 
nations 

(1) Enlistment of support of non-Com- 
munist but dissident groups 

(a) Infiltration and undermining of 
free organizations and institutions 

(b) Communist-front organizations 

(2) Disorganization and disruption of 
normal political, economic, and so- 
cial processes 

(3) Incitement to open rebellion 

17 



Communists engage in the protracted 
conflict both in place and time (willing- 
ness to concede now in order to advance 
later) 



SUGGESTED READING (From the Bibliography) 



Teacher 



Carew-Hunt, R. N. 

Charques, Richard D. 
Dallin, David J. 
Dutton, E. G. 
Fischer, John 

Lippmann, Walter 

Nolan, William A. 

Novack, Jos. 

Novack, Jos. 
Overstreet, H. & B. 
Seton- Watson, Hugh 
Seton-Watson, Hugh 

Strauss & Hupe 



The Theory and Practice of 

Communism 
Short History of Russia 
The Real Soviet Russia 
What is Communism? 
Why They Behave like 

Russians 
The Communist World and 

Ours 
Communism Versus the 

Negro 

The Future is Ours, 
Comrade 

No Third Path 
The War Called Peace 
Prom Lenin to Khrushchev 
The East European Revolu- 
tion 
Protracted Conflict 



Pupils 



Ebenstein, William 
Hoover, J. Edgar 
Hudson, G. F. et al 
Nager, N. H. & Katel, 

Jacque 
Readers Digest Service, 

Inc. 
Swearingen, Rodger 



Two Ways of life 
Masters of Deceit 
The Sino-Soviet Dispute 

Conquest Without War 
Communism Menace to 

Freedom 
The Communist World 



Behind the Iron Curtain 
Cracks in the Soviet 

Empire 
Dealing with Russia 
Shadow on the Kremlin 



FlLMSTRIPS 

Current Affairs Filmstrips 



New York Times 
Filmstrip House 
New York Times 



18 



Films 

Communism United World Films 

Communism Coronet Films 

Nightmare in Red Audio-Visual Aids Library 

The Soviet Union and 
People Coronet Films 

Suggested Activities 

1. Bring in a speaker who has been to Russia to make 
observations in his field. 

2. Arrange for a trip to the Soviet Embassy, 

3. Assign for research and discussion the consideration 
of the status of the following economic factors under 
communism: ownership of property, ownership of 
capital, competition, and gpvernment's relation to 
business. 

4. Appoint a committee to gather from the published 
reports of statements by Communist officials and 
from the Communist press examples of attempts to 
discredit respected traditions, organizations, and in- 
stitutions. 

5. Conduct a mock Russian election. 

6. Invite a speaker to discuss the American economic 
system. 



Suggested Ways of Evaluating Outcomes 

1. Have your opinions of Communism and the Soviet 
Union changed since studying this unit? 

2. Write a short essay on "What Democracy Means to 
Me." 

3. Compare communist definitions of such terms as 
democracy, freedom, individual rights, socialism, etc, 
with the commonly accepted definitions in the free 
world. 



19 



III. COMPARISON OF THE CONCEPTS 
AND PRACTICES OF AMERICAN 
DEMOCRACY AND COMMUNISM * 

A, The Individual 

1. In the American democratic state 

a. There is substantial individual freedom 
of the mind and access to a wide variety 
of information and points of view 

b. Respect for the individual is an accepted 
ideal 

c The individual has certain rights and 
freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution 
and its amendments, such as freedom of 
speech and press, and is assured a fair 
trial 

d. The individual's rights and freedoms are 
protected by due process of law and an 
independent court system 

2. In a Communist state 

a. The Party establishes authority over the 
mind and sources of information 

b. The individual's importance is contin- 
gent upon his value to the state 

c. The individual has only those rights yield- 
ed to him by the state, these rights also 
being subject to withdrawal by the state 

d The state exercises complete control over 
the individual and the court 



(*) This is the content suggested for use in fulfilling 
the third objective: To educate our students to the 
strengths and weaknesses of these two conflicting 
systems in order to point out the menace of Com- 
munism and establish the merits of our society. 



20 



1' 



B. Social Institutions 

1. In the American democratic state 

a. Culture is the product of individuals and 
group thinking, acting, and creating for 
themselves 

b. The family exists for the development 
of the individual 

c. The individual is free to choose his own 
moral code of ethics and his own re- 



i ligious future 

i . d. Public education is concerned with pre- 

r paring children for the making of choices 

e* There are various strata of' society but 
I class differences are minimized 

i 

2. In a Communist state 

i j 1 a. All phases of culture are subject to di- 

ll rection by the state 

**- b. The family is allowed to exist as a unit 

to provide children for the state and to 
accomplish the 'state's aims 

a The state sponsors and supports a single 
ideology, namely communism; the indi- 
:j [ vidual is discouraged from thinking in- 

j ' dependently about religion 

[[j d. Public education is concerned with pre- 

\ paring children to accept the decisions of 

; the state 

e. Social classes are considered unnecessary 
and class distinctions, evils to be abolish- 
ed* (In theory there is only the pro- 
letariat; in practice, class distinctions are 
I i developing) 

C. Economic Institutions 

1. In the American democratic state 

I a. The individual is free to profit from his 

/ * ideas 

I 

f i b. Competition is encouraged 

c Private enterprise is fostered 

d. A worker through his union may bargain 
collectively with his employer 

21 



e. The means of production may be and 
generally are privately owned 



2, In a Communist- state 

a. Ideas are the property of the state 

b. Competition is considered to be the very 
heart of oppression — state control is the 
only answer 

a Private -enterprise is generally considered ,|) 

subversive and hostile to the state \ 

d. The state dominates the unions — strikes f 
are not allowed . | 

e. The means of production are owned by 
the state 



D. Political Institutions 

1. In the American democratic state 

a, Public opinion influences governmental 
policy; a free exchange of ideas is 
allqwed 

b. Civil liberties are guaranteed by the fed- 
eral constitution 



* 
*' 



c. A multi-party system with opposition 
among and within parties is recognized 

d. Any qualified individual may seek office 
and enjoy freedom of choice by secret 
ballot 

e. Government is by the consent of the 
governed — of, by, and for the people 



2. In a Communist state [ 

a. Public opinion is molded by the govern- *. 
menr, which controls public information \ 

b. No civil liberties are guaranteed f 

c. There is one monolithic party — no ^ 
deviations are permitted f 

d. The Party selects all nominees and desig- 
nates only one candidate for each office 

e. Government is the machinery for ex- 
pressing the will of the party 

22 



it f I 



P i 



J!- 



a 



SUGGESTED READING (From the 
Bibliography) 

Teachers 



Adams, Arthur E. (Editor) 



Barnett, A. Doak 



Bauer, Inkeles and Kluck- 

hohn 
Carew-Hunt, R. N. 

Hendel, Samuel 
Hook, Sidney 
Reshetar, John S. 



Vernadsky, George 
Whiting, Kenneth R. 
Zagoria, Donald S. 



Readings in Soviet Foreign 
Policy: Theory and Prac- 
tice 
Communist China and Asia: 
Challenge to American 
Policy 
How the Soviet System 

Works 
The Theory and Practice of 

Communism 
The Soviet Crucible 
Marx and the Marxists 
A Concise History of the 
Communist Party in the 
Soviet Union 
A History of Russia 
The Soviet Union Today 
The Sino-Soviet Conflict 



Barber, Zavedi 

Colegrove, Kenneth 
Dodge, Martin 
Ebenstein, William 
Ebenstein, William 
Lippman, Walter 
Loucks, William N. 
Swearingen, Rodger 



Pupils 

Democracy and Dictatorship; Their 
Psychology and Patterns of Life 

Democracy Versus Communism 

Know Your Isms 

Today's Isms 

Two Ways of Life 

The Communist World and Ours 

Comparative Economic Systems 

The World of Communism 

Pamphlets 



Capitalism and Their Competitors, Oxford Social Studies 

Capitalism and Other Economic Systems, Council for the 
Advancement of Secondary Education 

Capitalism, Socialism, Communism, Michigan State Uni- 
versity 

Freedom Versus Communism, The Chamber of Commerce 

of the United States 
The Isms and You, Tufts University 

23 



\ \ 



FlLMSTRIPS 

The American Way Society for VisuarEducation 

Living in the Soviet Union Society for Visual Education 
Today 

Shadow on the Kremlin The New York Times 

Films 

Backfire American Economic Foundation 

Democracy Encyclopaedia Britannica 

Communism United World Films ^ 

Recordings 

Communist Strategy of World The Campus Library 

Domination 

Ideologies and Democracy The Campus Library 

The Nature and Threat of Com- The Campus Library 
munis7n 



. i 



4' 



M» 



Suggested Activities 

1. Arrange a visit to the United Nations. 

2. Secure a qualified speaker who has had the experi- 
ence of living under the American and Soviet Union 
governments. 

3- Assign a panel of students to study the "Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights" of the United Na- 
tions and to contrast the principles and practices of 
the United States with those of the Soviet Union in 
regard to these human rights. 

J 

4. In short form, ask students to compare and contrast X 
the American and the Soviet Union ways of life in ^ 
terms of: (1) sources of political power; (2) eco- * 
nomic systems; (3) rights of citizens; (4) theoreti- Jj 
cal foundations; and (5) practical applications. 

5. Arrange a student debate on the topic: The Ameri- ' * 
can economic system provides greater incentives and 

higher production than any other system in which 
the government allocates almost all economic re- 
sources. 

24 



Suggested Ways of Evaluating Outcomes 

1. Imagine that you made a trip to the Soviet Union, 
Evaluate the differences, as you see them, of the two 
ways of life (American and Soviet). 

2. Present some behavioral stories that would result in 
student reaction to the stories. 

3- After listening to the tape, "An Interrogation and 
Investigation of Treatment of Prisoners of War in 
Korea/' ask students to give their reactions to the 
presentation of this type of technique. 

4. Evaluate the study of this unit withjthe students to 
see in what ways it might be strengthened of in what 
areas the content can be improved. 

5. Have students evaluate the question: "Should high 
school students study about Communism?" 



25 



IV. THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE 
INDIVIDUAL TO COMBAT COM- 
MUNISM • 

The individual needs to: 



~Ar~~Know^ what * he~ believes^ himself and^ be^able* to*" 
defend his o\vn beliefs 

1. Continue to study the history of the United 
States to develop a better understanding of 
American traditions and principles, ideals, 
and goals - - - ^ 

2. Continue to study the principles and prac- 
tices of America's government at all levels, 
but particularly at the local level where 
Communism would be likely to strike first 

3- Improve his understanding of the way our 
economic system operates and why it oper- 
ates that way 

4- Develop a deeper understanding of his 
religious faith and ethical principles 

B. Be acquainted with the beliefs, goals, and 
methods of Communism 

1. Beliefs; such as, the inevitable triumph of 
world-wide Communism; totalitarian organ- 
ization of society and the state is preferable 
to individual freedom; Communist party 
leaders are infalliable; there is no God; any 
means - particularly force - is justified to 
reach Communist goals; Communism and 
American democracy cannot exist side-by- 
side indefinitely; Communists owe their 
first allegiance to the Communist state 

2. Long-term goals of destruction of the capi- 
talistic system and Communist-led, world- 
wide revolution and immediate gpals; such 
as, security for the U.S.S.R. (China, etc.), 
a ban on U. S. nuclear testing, etc. 



(*) This is the content suggested for use in fulfilling 
the fourth objective: To develop in the student 
an awareness of his responsibility to combat Com- 
munism using methods appropriate to our demo- 
cratic ideals, 

26 



3- Methods used to expand Communist influ- 
ence outside the U.S.S.R. 

a. Direct appeal :to the people (not the 
government) of another country 

b. Any means, legal or illegal, (including 
temporary retreat or the use of force) is 
justified to reach Communist goals 
(note 1 above); tactics shifted as neces- 
sary to attain immediate and/or ultimate 
goals 

(1) Underground activities 

(a) lies 

(b) deceit 

(c) thefc 

(d) subversion 

(e) sabotage and espionage 

(f) murder and terrorism 

(2) Aboveground operations 

(a) infiltration 

(b) propaganda techniques and devices 

(c) "popular fronts"; front organiza- 
tions 

(d) "divide and conquer" through 
appeals to special individuals and 
groups: the desperate, the mis- 
guided and the uninformed, the 
lazy, the naive idealist, embittered 
members of minority races, the 
opportunist, the frustrated, the 
youthful adventurer, the disillu- 
sioned, the frustrated leader or 
the frantic follower 

(e) aid to underdeveloped nations and 
trade policies 

(f) co-existence 

(g) mass agitation techniques 

(h) aid to revolutionary movements 
(i) direct attack on those who investi- 
gate or expose them 



C Be well-informed about current affairs: local, 
national, world 

1. Read regularly a daily newspaper with a 
good coverage "of national and international 
news, periodicals, booKs, etc. 

27 



2. Improve his understanding of the sematics 
of the Communists: their use of jargon and 
double talk 

D. Do his own thinking and use the logical, scien- 
tific method of reaching a decision or making 

^a^ choice* * — " = ^ 

1. Get all the facts he can; avoid "wishful 
thinking" (ignoring unpleasant facts) 

2. Consider all possible answers to a question 
or solutions to a problem and test them 
against the facts before^ reaching a con- 
clusion 

3. Keep an open mind; wait until all the facts 
are available; don't jump to a conclusion 

E. Be an active (not passive) citizen of his com- 
munity 

1 . Accept his fair share of civic responsibilities : 
voluntary or compulsory service in protec- 
tive organizations, jury service, public office, 
voting and political party membership, etc. 

2. Participate in legitimate community organ- 
^ izations ; 

\ a. for good fellowship 
b- for information 
c. for community improvement 

3- Do what he is able to do to improve un- 
satisfactory conditions: in himself, his, com- 
munity, the nation, and the world 

4. Be alert (and well-enough informed) to 
spot, expose, and oppose Communist efforts; 
BUT LEAVE SPY-HUNTING TO THE 
FBI, which has been given the job by the 
President, the Congress, and the Attorney 
General. J. Edgar Hoover, FBI Director, 
points out that "Hysteria, witch hunts, and 
vigilantes* weaken our internal security . - . 
we must be absolutely certain that our fight 
is waged with full regard for the historic 
liberties of this great nation. This is the 
fundamental premise of any attack against 
communism .... Smears, character assas- 
sination, and the scattering of irresponsible 
charges have no place in this nation. They 
create division, suspicion, and distrust 

28 



among loyal Americans — just what the 
Communists want — and hinder rather than 
aid the fight against Communism/' * 



SUGGESTED READING 

Bibliography 

Teachers 



(From the 



Budenz, Louis F, 
Fisher, Harold H. 

Flesch, Rudolf 
Kirkpatrick, EvronM. (ed) 



Overstreet, Harry 
U. S. Congress. House 
Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities 

U. S. Congress. Senate 
Subcommittee on Internal 
Security 



U. S. Congress. Senate 
Committee >on fc the Judiciary 

Yesipou, B. P. & Concharov, 
N.K. (trans, by S. 
Counts & Nucia Lodge) 

Nolan, William A. 



The Techniques of Commu-. 
nism 

The Communist Revolution'. 

An Outline of Strategy 

and Tactics 
The Art of Clear Thinking 
Year of Crisis i Communist 

Propaganda Activities in 

1955 
The Mature Mind 
The Communist Conspiracy. 

Strategy and Tactics of 

World Communism 

The Communist Party of the 
United States of America-. 
What It Is: How It 
Works; a Handbook for 
Americans 

The Technique of Soviet 

Propaganda Eighty-sixth 

— Congress,. Second Session 

J Want to Be Like Stalin 



Communism Versus the 
Negro 



Colegrove, Kenneth 

Ebenstein, William 
Hoover, J. Edgar 



Minteer, Catherine 



Pupils 

Democracy versus Commu- 
nism 
Two Ways of Life 

Masters of Deceit (glossary, 
pp. 315-327; ch, 14-22 
abd 24) 

Words and What They Do 
To You 



(*) J. Edgar Hoover, Masters of Deceit, p, 290 - Holt, 
Rinehart & Winston, Inc. Quoted by permission. 

29 



Overstreet, H. & B. What We Must Know 

About Communis?n (part 
2) 

Swearingen, Rodger The World of Communism. 

(appendix A; ch. 2, 3, 8, _ 

— 9, 14-22) - 

U. S. Congress. House 100 Things Yon Should 

Committee on Un-Ameri- Know About Communism 

can Activities 

Whitehead, Don The FBI Story 

Suggested Activities 

1. Take a guided tour of FBI headquarters in Washing- 
ton. 

2. Have a former Peace Corps volunteer (or other 
person who has worked in an underdeveloped coun- 
try) address the class. 

3. Use such tape recordings as those in the Freedom 
Series: The Strategy of Freedom, Extremism in 
American Politics, The Emerging Nations, People-to- 
People Programs, Latin America in Transition. * 

Suggested Ways of Evaluating Outcomes 

1. Pupils find several items in newspapers and current 
periodicals which illustrate any of the points brought 
out in this study. 

2. Pupils read and comment on one of the following 
autobiographical accounts of a former Communist: 
Bentley, Elizabeth. Out of Bondage; Budenz, Luis, 
Men Without Faces; Chambers, Whittaker. Witness; 
Gittow, Benjamin. The Whole Of Their Lives: Com- 
munism in America; Philbrick, Herbert A. I Led 
Three Lives: Citizen, Communist, Counterspy. 

3. The teacher might present several different examples 
of Communist (or totalitarian) propaganda for the 
class to analyze and identify. 

4- Administer a periodic current affairs test, such as 
those published by the New York Times or Time 
magazine. 

5. Have each pupil prepare a statement of the extent 
to which he participates now as an active citizen in 
the everyday life of his community (broadly con- 
ceived). 



(*) The Campus Library (available from Campus 
World, Inc., 3757 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles 
5, Calif.) 

30 



GLOSSARY OF COMMUNIST DOUBLE TALK 



INTRODUCTION 

Communist jargon can be subdivided into two types: 1) the un- 
equivocal type and 2) the type designed to confuse. This glossary is con- 
cerned with the latter type only. 

The unequivocal jargon comprises such terms as deviationism, formalism, 
reformism and individualism. R. N. Carew-Hunt, in his book A Guide to 
Communist Jargon (The MacMillan Co., New York 1957) discusses fifty 
such terms, and J. Edgar Hoover's Masters of Deceit contains a glossary per- 
taining to this type of jargon. 

As regard the jargon of the. confusing type, the situation is much 
less transparent This type, which is also known as communist double talk, 
class language, or aesopian language, consists of familiar, everyday words to 
which the Communists have given a second meaning. This second meaning 
is quite different from the idea the word normally conveys to us, and is 
deliberately designed to sow confusion in non-bommunist minds. Unless we 
are familiar with the second meaning of these words, we are bound to be 
dangerously misled. However, once we have learned to decode this class 
language, we realize that there is no basic difference between a belli- 
gerent communist speech and one that sounds conciliatory; we are no longer 
pleasantly surprised or overly hopeful when the Communists all of a sudden 
seem to extend the hand of "peace"; nor are we overly dismayed or indignant 
when the Communists accuse us of "aggression" we know we have not com- 
mitted. 

A particularly confusing aspect of the class language is the fact that the 
Communists in their speeches and statements sometimes alternate between 
the two meanings of these aesopian terms when this suits their purpose, A 
trained Communist in the audience has no difficulty in deciding what the 
speaker means; the uninformed members of the audience are invariably mis- 
led. And misleading the enemy is one of Communism's most important 
stratagems in the cold war. 

The glossary of Communist double talk which follows is by no means 
complete- However, it lists the most important and most frequently used 
aesopian terms and should enable students to adequately decode most Com- 
munist statements and speeches as well as propaganda writings. 

ABNORMAL 

Abnormal refers to any state of affairs which blocks communist expan- 
sion. Thus the situation in Berlin is abnormal. 



References 

1. Overstreet, Harry and Bonaro The War Called Peace 

2. Overstreet, Harry and Bonaro What We Must Know About Communism 

31 



AGGRESSIQN 

Aggression is whatever stands in the way of the communist world 
revolution. Thus, when the United States resumed nuclear testing after 
the Soviet Union had broken the Moratorium in 1961 (which amounted to a_ 
gentlemen's agreement between the two countries not to resume'nuclear test- 
ing), Gromyko, called the Ur S. act "an aggression against peace". By defini- 
tion, aggression can only be committed by non-communist nations. What we 
would call communist aggression, the communists call "working for peace", 
"doing their international duty", "furthering proletarian internationalism", 
"promoting the historical process", and the like. 

AGREEMENT 

Lenin has given the following definitions of this concept: "For non- 
party people, an agreement is a resolution or policy framed during a confer- 
ence between opposing groups. It is, in brief, a product of give and take . . . 
But for party people, an agreement is an attempt to enlist others for the 
purpose of carrying out the party policy". By coming to an agreement with 
others, communists mean convincing the others that they - the communists - 
are right. It cannot mean entering into a process of give and take, because 
party decisions, arrived at in advance, must be kept inviolate. 

CLASS MORALITY 

Lenin has said: "The communist party is the mind, the conscience and 
the morals of our epoch. Proletarian morality is determined by the exigencies 
of the class struggle". Any statement, any action, any inaction that furthers 
the communist cause is moral. Thus, the communists subscribe to the 
principle that has been adhered to by many other fanatic groups in history: 
the end justifies the means. Class morality is the immorality of violence, 
double-dealing and double-speaking. 

DEMOCRACY 

When communists talk about democracy, they mean "democratic central- 
ism". Democratic centralism was invented by Lenin to give the party 
"monolithic strength". He structured the party, layer upon layer, in the 
shape of a pyramid; and the smaller the layer, the greater the power until, 
at the top, power became absolute. On matters where no decisions had been 
reached, opinions could, in theory, move from the bottom up, though any- 
one who expressed an unorthodox opinion soon became "unreliable". This 
theoretical upward flow of opinion was stated to be the "democratic" feature. 
But "centralism" was the dominant feature: decisions must always move 
downward; and they must, at each level, be given unanimous, unstinting sup- 
port. To insure this, coercion also moved from the top down. 

EXPLOITER 

An exploiter is anyone who belongs to the capitalist class as defined by 
the communists. Capitalists, according to this definition, are all those people 
who are not laborers or peasants. The individual capitalist, according to 

32 



Marx, might be, and often was, a kindly man who cared about his workers 
and was doing his best to improve their lot- Nonetheless, because he be- 
longed to the capitalist class, he was as much an exploiter as his more ruth- 
less fellows; and, like them, he would have to be liquidated when the 
revolution came. American communists, in their more outspoken days, have 
openly stated that the establishment of socialism in the U. S. would require 
the liquidation of about one third of the American population. (An inter- 
esting statement to consider for the proponents of the "better red than dead" 
philosophy). Latsis, one of the high-ranking members in Lenin's Cheka 
(secret police) put it this way: "We are not waging war against particular 
individuals. We are exterminating the bourgeois as a class. Don't look for 
evidence to prove that the accused acted by deed or word against the 
Soviet Power. The first question you should ask is to what class he belongs, 
what is his origin, his training, and his occupation. Herein lies the meaning 
and the essence of the Red Terror". According to Khrushchev, there is 
less need for this terror in the Soviet Union today than there used to be. 
It seems safe to assume that this is because wholesale slaughter in the Soviet 
Union has effectively eliminated the opponents and sufficiently scared the 
survivors. 

FRATERNAL GUIDANCE 

When the Soviet Union, after having "liberated" (see above) a country, 
requires this country to subordinate its economy to Soviet needs, it offers 
that country fraternal guidance. 

FREEDOM 

The standard Soviet dictionary defines the word freedom as "the recogni- 
tion of necessity". By virtue of its "advanced" insight, the communist party 
must assert and defend its right to define what is necessary, "A person is 
free, then, to the extent that he understands why the party line is right". He 
becomes more nearly free whenever he performs an act that makes him iden- 
tify his_ own good with the party line. He manifests his freedom whenever" 
he indicates in any approved fashion - from diligence on the job to the 
casting of the right vote - that such identification has taken place. 

HISTORIC PROCESS 

The historic process is that process which, according to Marx, has been 
brought^ into being by the first division of labor rooted in private property, 
and-which. will continue until the "inevitable" communization of all property 
everywhere has been achieved; This "fated" ^historical process is a one-way 
process- It calls for a progressive expansion oFthe communists domain, .but 
never for a contraction of it. As noted before, communists find it necessary 
to help dogma, in this case the "inevitable process", along. Capitalism must 
always and everywhere be on the way out, never on the way in. This means 
that all communist grabs are for keeps. For example, for Stalin to have 
encouraged - or tolerated - the reunification of Germany, by free election, 
along non-communist lines, would have amounted to his countenancing a 
reversal of the "historic process". 

33 



IMPERIALIST AGGRESSORS, WARMONGERS 

Jusc as Marx branded people as exploiters (see* this glossary) regardless 
of their character or conduct, and with reference only to' their class, so 
Khrushchev, today, talks about imperialist aggressors and warmongers, with- 
out having to justify these terms by ^reference- to any ^action" performed by 
those whom he- condemns"^ They simply belong to the "wrong" class, and 
inhabit the "wrong" camp. 

INTERFERENCE 

According to communist dogma, the conventional meaning of this word 
applies exclusively to actions by ribn-communists. Thus, interference in the 
domestic affairs of the Soviet Union is some practice in which the com- 
munists themselves habitually engage with respect to other countries; how- 
ever, interference by communists in the internal affairs of non-communist 
countries, according to communist dogma, is extending "fraternal" support 
to the dispossessed or future rightful owners of the non-communist orbit, that 
is, to the subversive elements in non-communist countries. A year and a half 
after the Soviet Union's armed suppression of the popular uprising in 
Hungary, Khrushchev made a speech in that country, stating: "Comrades, 
believe us ... By helping the Hungarian people (see this glossary for the 
definition of the word people) smash the counter-revolution we performed 
our internationalist duty (see this glossary for the meaning of internationalist 
duty) .... We came to, you as your most loyal friends and brothers . . .We 
do not interfere". 

INTERNATIONALISM, INTERNATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL DUTY 

In his September 1959 speech to the General Assembly, Khrushchev 
used the word "international" 34 times. He called for a "new spirit in 
international relations". All international issues, he said, could be resolved by 
"peaceful means". Thus the world would enter upon a "new state of inter- 
national life." But in no one of his 34 uses of the word did he define what 
it meant to him. His communist hearers needed no definition; and if most 
of his non-communist hearers did not know they needed one, he showed no 
urge to point out their need. 

From the time of Lenin on, however, the communist party has attached 
a very special meaning to this word- In 1920, the Comintern made a 
distinction which the communists have never since abandoned: "Petty- 
bourgeois nationalism considers internationalism to mean the mere recogni- 
tion of the rights of national equality, and preserves intact national ego- 
tism . . . Proletarian internationalism, on the other hand, demands: 1) sub- 
ordination of the interests of the proletarian struggle in one country to the 
interests of the struggle on ah international scale: 2) the capability and 
readiness on the part of one nation which has gained a victory over the 
bourgeoisie, of making the greatest national sacrifices for the overthrow of 
international capitalism". Khrushchev still speaks the language of the 
Comintern. He has called for the wider "education of the working people 
in the spirit of proletarian internationalism". By fulfilling and overful- 

34 



filling the goals of the Seven Year Plan, he said, the Soviet people would 
help the world-camp of socialism outstrip the capitalist nations, and would 
thus be doing their "international duty". The Soviet Union, according to 
Khrushchev, did not "interfere" in Hungary when it moved in to smash the 
popular uprising, but merely performed its "international duty". When the 
Soviet Union practices colonialism, it is "proletarian internationalism". 

LIBERATION 

A country is liberated when communist rule is imposed upon it by 
armed force. Thus, Stalin 'liberated the East-European countries from 
bourgeois capitalism". 

NEGOTIATION 

According to communist dogma, the class struggle - which is now being 
carried on at the international plane - cannot in any basic sense be negotiated, 
because it will not end until the capitalist world has been liquidated. Thus, 
a conference table - even when it is called a peace table - is simply one 
more place where war is carried on. When communists negotiate with non- 
communists, they are not seeking to establish peace. They are trying to man- 
euver themselves into the best available position for continuing war. There 
is in these negotiations no common search for a solution to common prob- 
lems. The communists come to the conference table ideologically set against 
a meeting of minds, because to be influenced by the other man's viewpoint 
means to be controlled by him. This must not happen. Any flexible give 
and take in the field of ideas is definitely out. There cannot be any negotia- 
tion in the western sense of the word; there can only be bargaining on non- 
basic, limited issues. One of the most notable "negotiating" tactics of the 
communists is to delay progress. By such delay they aim to exploit the 
characteristic impatience of Western people, who want to complete a task 
and get things done. Communist negotiators act upon the premise that if 
they delay matters long enough, their free-world opponents will recede from 
previously held positions in order to achieve a measure of progress. 

PEACE 

The communists are carrying on a Holy War. This war is not of their 
making; they just discovered its existence. It is the class war, that funda- 
mental conflict between the exploited and the exploiters, or the proletariat 
and the bourgeoisie.. This jwar is a "historic process" which will inevitably 
end with victory for the proletariat. At present, this war is being waged 
primarily at the international level between the capitalistic and the com- 
munist countries. Thus, peace in the communist sense of the word means 
the state_ of affairs which will obtain after the "historic process" will have 
reached its endpoint, that is, when communist world conquest is achieved. 
Any action that advances this world conquest is a "peaceful" one. For 
example, the wholesale massacre of Tibetans, the crushing, by means of 
tanks, of the uprisings in Hungary, East Germany and Poland are peaceful 
actions. 

35 



PEACEFUL COEXISTENCE 

Every well-schooled communist reads the word war where the rest of the 
world is invited to read the word peace. Peaceful coexistence is war with 
new weapons- In Khrushchev's view, the world balance of power has so der~- 
cisively shifted in favor o'f the socialist camp that- a- neWpossiBility has in- 
troduced itself into the "historic~process", namely that communism's final 
take-over of the world might be achieved without a shooting war. The West- 
ern "warmongers" (see this glossary) are becoming less and less inclined to 
start an "imperialist" war (see this glossary), while the camp of "peace" 
(see this glossary) is getting stronger and stronger. The great point of 
change in the "historic process" will come when the "imperialist" camp finally 
recognizes the futility of starting a shooting war. At this point, the found- 
ation will have been laid for peaceful coexistence between "states with* dif- 
ferent social systems" (see this glossary). The doctrine of peaceful coexist- 
ence does not imply ideological peace. It must be understood not as one 
that would lead to a gradual easing of the class struggle, but as a bold doc- 
trine for opening up opportunities to carry on that struggle along new lines. 
It calls for an urgent stepping-up of the effort to instill "communist con- 
sciousness" and to combat "bourgeois ideology"* 

PEOPLE 

In communist class-language, the people is that part of a population 
which will give unqualified consent to the totalitarian rule exercised by the 
communist party* Once we realize this, we are able to understand what 
Khrushchev meant when he said on his arrival in New York City in I960; 
"I would like to voice the profound respect I feel toward the entire American 
people, and to wish them success". He meant not those large groups of 
Americans he had denounced so often before, such as all those who have 
not accepted his definition of peaceful coexistence, or the "capitalists". Thus 
we can also understand Khrushchev's hailing of Kadar as the leader of the 
Hungarian people. 

PROGRESS, PROGRESSIVE 

Each step taken toward the ultimate communist goal of unifying the 
world under the communist system is progress. Progressive forces are those 
which work toward communist world domination. Only the smallest fraction 
of the population of a country may be progressive. This fraction is also 
referred to by the communists as the "workers" or the "people". 

SELF-DETERMINATION 

To us, this word means the right of peoples to choose their own forms 
of government, and not to be subject to outside coercion. In communist 
class-language, however, self-determination comes down to the right of the 
Russian communist party to determine for other peoples and nations the 
"correct" form of^government. Lenin wrote in 1903 that "our unqualified 
recognition of "the right of self-determination does not commit us to sup- 
porting every demand for national self-determination". The revolutionary task 
of the Bolsheviks, he said, was "to advance the self-determination of the 

" 36 



working-class (read: the communists) within each nationality rather than 
the self-determination of peoples and nationalities", Stalin agreed at Yalta 
to future self-determination for Germany, and then settled down to the busi- 
ness of blocking free elections in that country. "Thus", he said, "the old 
bourgeois interpretation of self-determination became a fiction". 

SOCIALIST SOLIDARITY 

Russian domination of the world communist movement. 

STATES WITH DIFFERENT SOCIAL SYSTEMS — SYSTEM OF 
STATES 

Again and again, where party leaders have not wanted to spell out their 
full revolutionary intentions, they have employed one of the above phrases. 
These phrases sound perfectly innocent to us, but every well-schooled com- 
munist the world over knows that they refer to the following statement Lenin 
made in 1919: 

". . ♦ there are wars and wars. We condemned the imperialist war, 
but we do not reject war in general ... Of course not. We are living not 
merely in a state, but in a system of states, and the existence of the Soviet 
Republic side by side with imperialist states for a long time is unthinkable. 
One or the other must triumph in the end. And before that end supervenes, 
a series of frightful collisions between the Soviet Republic and the bourgeois 
states will be inevitable"* 



37 



BIBLIOG RAPHY 



This bibliography includes all of the books referred to in the various 
sections of The Challenge of Our Times. In addition to those items recom- 
mended and associated with the various sub-topics, this list includes items that 
may be of interest to teachers or students in doing deeper research. 

Teachers are reminded that any book must be used with caution; par- 
ticularly in dealing with the subject at hand- There are very few publications 
that do not involve some degree of personal expression from the author. 
Students should be reminded that because a statement is printed and bound 
in a book it is not necessarily infallible. 



38 



1 BIBLIOGRAPHY 

* Adams, Arthur E. Readings* in Soviet Foreign Policy z Theory and 

Practice. Boston: D. C Heath and Gompany, 1961. 
420 pp. 

* Barber, Zavedi. Democracy & Dictatorships Their Psychology & Patterns 

of Life. Grove Press 

* Barnett, A. Doak. Communist China and Asia: Challenge to American 

Policy. New York: Harper & Bros., I960 

* Bauer, Raymond A., Inkeles, Alex; and Kluckhohn, Clyde. How the 

Soviet System Works. New York: Vintage Books, 
1956. 312 pp. 

Bohlman, Edna McCaull. Democracy and Its Competitors. Columbus, 

Ohio: Charles E. Merrill Books, Inc. 80 pp. 

Borkenau, Franz. European Communism. New York: Harper Bjros., 1953. 

Borkenau, Franz. World Communism. New York: W. W. Norton Co., 

1939 (Ann Harbor, Mich,: University of Michigan 
Press, 1961) 

Boyd, Andrew. An Atlas of World Affairs. New York: Frederick A. 
Praeger, Inc., 1962. 

Brzezenski, Zhigniew K. The Soviet Bloc: Unity and Conflict. New 

York: Frederick A. Praeger, Inc, 1961. 

* Budenz, Louis F. The Techniques of Communism: Chicago: Henry 

Regnery, 1954. 342 pp. 

Campbell, Robert W. Soviet Economic Power. Boston: Houghton Mif- 
flin Co., I960. 

Carew-Hunt Robert Nigel. A Guide to Communist Jargon. New York: 

Macmillan, 1957- 

Carew-Hunt, Robert Nigel. Marxism Past and Present. New York: 

Macmillan, 1955. 

* Carew-Hunt, Robert Nigel. The Theory and Practice of Communism. 

New York: Macmillan, 1957. 286 pp. 

Chai-ch'u and Chai Winberc TheXhanging Society of China. New York: 

New American -Library, 1962. 

* Charques, Richard D. Short History of Russia. Dutton & Co. 

* Colegrove, Kenneth. Democracy Versus Communism. Princeton: D. Van 

Nostrand Company, Inc., 1957. 424 pp. 

Citizenship Education Project. When Men Are Free. Boston: Houghton 

Millfin Company. 1955 



( * ) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

39 



Communisms Menace to, Freedom, Pleasantville, 
N. Y.: Reader's Digest Services, Inc., 1962. ___ — 

Crankshaw, Edward. Russia Without Stalfa^JNevs^Yokk: Viking Press, 

1956.___-— — -^ 

Counts,- George^S. The Challenge of Soviet Education. New York: 

McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1957. 

Cronin, George W. A Primer on Communism. New York: E.^P. Dut- 

ton, 1957 

Daliin, Alexander. The Soviet" Union at the United Nations: An Inquiry 

Into Soviet Motives and Objectives* New York: 
Frederick A. Praeger, Inc., 1962. 

Changing World of Soviet Russia, New Haven: Yale 
University Press, 1956. 

The Real Soviet Russia. New Haven: Yale University 
Press 



Daliin, David. 
* Daliin, David 



Daniels, Robert V. A Documentary History of Communism: New York: 

Random House, I960. 

Devereaux, Uanza; Akor, Homer Eerris; Babcock, Chester D. Building 

Our Democracy. San Francisco: Harr Wagner 
Publishing Co., 1962. 348 pp. 

The New Class: An Analysis of the Communist System. 
New York: Frederick A. Praeger, Inc., 1957. 214 pp. 

New York:, Farrar, Straus & Co., 1950 



Djilas, Milovan. 



* Dodge, Martin. 

* Dutton, E. G. 



Know Your Isms. 
What Is Communism? Dutton & Company 



* Ebenstein, William. Two Ways of Life: The Communist Challenge to 

Democracy. New York: Holt, Rhinehart 8c Win- 
ston, Inc., 1962. 406 pp. 

* Ebenstein, William. Today's Isms. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice- 

Hall, 1961. 243 pp. 

Ebenstein, William. Totalitarianism: New Perspectives. New York: 

Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 1962. 80 pp. 

Editors of Scholastic Book Services. The Soviet Union. New York: 

Scholastic Book Services, 1962. 160 pp. 

Editors of Scholastic Magazines. What You Should Know About Com- 
munism and Why. New York: Scholastic Book 
Services, 1962. (Edition I, 128 p.; Edition II, 192 p.) 

Fainsod, Merle. How Russia is Ruled. Cambridge, Mass.: Howard Uni- 
versity Press, 1953- 



(*) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

40 



* Fisher; Harold H. The Communist Revolution: An outline of Strategy 

and Tactics. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University 
Press, 1955. 89 pp. 

* Fisher, John. Why They Behave Like Russians. Harper & Bros. 

Fischer, Louis. The Soviets in World Affairs. New York: Vintage 
Books, I960. 

* Flesch, Rudolf Franz. The Art of Clear Thinking. New York: Harper 

& Bros., 1951. 212 pp. 

Freedom: America's Choice. Pleasantville, N. Y.: 
Reader's Digest Services, Inc., 1962. 160 pp. 

Garthoff, Raymond L. Soviet Strategy in the Nuclear Age. New York: 

Frederick A. Praeger, Inc., 1962. 

Gsovski, Vladimir and Grybowski, Kezermierz. Gov't. Law and Courts 

in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. New 
York: Frederick A. Praeger, Inc., 1958. 

* Hendel, Samuel. The Soviet Crucible. New York: D. Van Nostrand 

Co., 1959. 

Hpdgkinson, Harry. The Language of Communism. New York: Pittman 

Co., 1955. 

* Hook, Sidney. Marx and the Marxist: The Ambiguous Legacy. Prince- 

ton: D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc., 1955. 254 pp. 

* Hoover, J. Edgar. Masters of Deceit. New York: Holt, Rinehart and 

Winston, 1958. 374 pp. 

Hoover, J. Edgar. A Study of Communism. New York: Holt, Rinehart 

and Winston, 1962. 212 pp. 

* Hudson, G. F. et al. The Sino-Soviet Dispute. New York: Frederick A. 

Praeger. 

Inkeles, Alex and Geiger, Kent. Soviet Society. Boston: Houghton 

Mifflin Co., 1961. 

Josny, Naum. Soviet Industrialization, 1928-1952. Chicago: The Uni- 
versity of Chicago Press, 1961. 

Kennan, George F. American Diplomacy, 1900-1950. New York: The 

New American Library, 1951. 

Kennan, George F. Russia and the West: Under Lenin- & Stalin. JNew 

York: New American Library of World Literature, 
Inc., 1962. 384 pp. 

King-Hall, Stephen. The Communist Conspiracy. London: Constable 

Co., 1953. 



(*) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

41 



* Kirkpatrick Evron M. Year of Crisis \ Communist Propaganda Activities 

in 1955. Macmillan & Co. 

Kohn, Hans. Basic History of Modern Russia. Political, Social, and Cul- 
tural Trends. New York: Van Nostrand Co,JL957. — 

Kulski, W. W. TfoSoviet^RegimerSyi&axse, N. Y.: Syracuse Uni- 

______ — — - ^~~~~~~~~~' versity Press, 1954. 

Laird, Roy D. Collective Farming in Russia-. A Political Study of the 
Soviet Kolkhozy. Lawrence, Kans., U. of Kansas, 1958. 

Lampert, E. Studies in Rebellion. New York: Praeger., 1957. 

Laurence, John. A History of Russia. New York: New American 
Library, 1962. 

LeRossignol, James E. From Marx to Stalin. New York: Crowell, 1940. 

* Lippman, Walter. The Communist World and Ours. Boston: Little, 

Brown & Co., 1959- 

* Loucks, William N. Comparative Economic Systems. New York: 

Harper & Bros., 1961. 

Lovenstein, Meno. Capitalism, Communism, Socialism. Minneapolis: 

Curriculum Resources, Inc., 1962. 150 pp. 

Mayo, Henry B. Introduction to Marxist Theory. New York: Oxford 

Book Co. 

McViher, Charles T. Thoism. New York: St. Martins Press, 1957. 

Mende, Tibor. China and Her Shadow. New York: Coward-McCann, 
1961. 

Meyer, Alfred G. Leninism. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1962. 

Meyer, Alfred G. Marxism, The Unity of Theory and Practice. 

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1954. 

* Miller, William J., Roberts, Henry L., and Shulman, Marshal D. 

The Meaning of Communism. Morristown, N. J. 
Silver Burdett Co., 1962. 

* Minteer, Catherine. Words and What They Do to You. Row, Peterson 

and Co., 1952. 128 pp. 

Moorehead, Alan. The Russian Revolution. New York: Bantam Books, 

Inc., 1958. 303 pp. 

Mosley, Philip E. The Kremlin and World Politics. New York: Vint- 
age Books, I960. 

Mussatti, James. The Constitution of the United States-. Our Charter of 
Liberties. Princeton: D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc., I960. 
222 pp. 



(*) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

42 






Nager, N. H. and Katel, Jacque. Conquest Without War. New York: 

Simon and Schuster. 

* Nolan, William A. Communism versus the Negro: Chicago: Henry 

Regnery, 1951. 

* Novack, Jos. The Future is Ours, Comrade. Garden City: Doubleday 

& Co. 

* Novack, Jos. No Third Path. Garden City: Doubleday & Co. 
Orwell, George. Animal Farm. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1954. 
Orwell, George. 1984. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1949. 

* Overstreet, Harry Allen. The Mature Mind. New Yorl?: W. W. Norton 

1959> 259 pp. 

* Overstreet, Harry and Bonaro. What We Must Know About Communism. 

New York: Pocket Books, Inc., 1958. 310 pp. 

* Overstreet, Harry and Bonaro. The War Called Peace. New York: W. 

W. Norton. 

Piatig, E. Raymond. The United States & the Soviet Challenge. (The 

Foreign Relations Series) River Forest, III. 
Laidlaw Bros. 1962. 66 pp. 

* Reshetar, John S., Jr. A Concise History of the Communist Party of the 

Soviet Union. New York: Frederick A. Praeeer. 
Inc., I960. a 

Rieber, Alfred J. and Nelson, Robert C. A Study of the US.S.R. and 

Communism*. A Historical Approach. Fairlawn, 
N. J.: Scott, Foresman & Co., 1962. 272 pp. 

Rostow, W. W, The Dynamics of Soviet Society. New York: The New 
American Library of World Literature, Inc, 1954. 264. pp. 

Runes, Dagobertd. The Soviet Impact on Society. New York: Philo- 
sophical Library, 1953. 

Rush, Myron. The Rise of Khrushchev. Washington, D. C: Public 
Affairs Press, 1958. 

Schapiro, Leonard. The Communist Party of the Soviet Union. New 

York: Random House, I960. 

Schwarz, Solomon M. Labor in the Soviet -Union. New York: 

Frederick A. Praeger, 1952. 

Scott, Dierck, J. R. Russian Political Institutions. New York: Rinehart 

& Co., 1958. 

* Seton-Watson, Hugh. From Lenin to Khrushchev. The History of 

World Communism. New York: Frederick A. 
Praeger, I960. 432 pp. 

(*) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

43 



* Seton-Watson, Hugh. The East* European Revolution. New York: 

Frederick A. Praeger 1956. __..-—— 

Seton-Watson, Hugh. The History of \X^orld^Communism. New York: 

Fredericks A.^Praeger^ 1953. 

Starr,_IsidorerT6dd, Lewis Paul; Curti, Merle (ed). Living American 
-— - ^ Documents. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 

Inc., 1961. 358 pp. 

* Strauss & Hupe. Protracted Conflict. Harper Bros.. 

* Swearingen, Rodger. The World' of Communism: Answers to the 100 

Questions Most Often Asked by American High 
School Students. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 
1962. 278 pp. 

Tang, Peter S. H. Communist China Today. Washington, D. C: Re- 
search Institute on the Sino-Soviet Block, 1961. 

Treadgold, Donald W. Twentieth Century Russia. Chicago: Rand 

McNally Co., 1959- 

U. S. Congress. House. 

Committee on Un-American Activities. A Primer on Communism. 

Washington, D. C: U. S. Printing 

office, 1956. 

* U. S. Congress. House. 100 Things You Should Know About 
Committee on Un-Ameri- Communism. Washington: U. S. Gov't, 
can Activities. Printing Office, 1950. 126 pp. 

* U. S. Congress- House- The Communist Conspiracy! Strategy and 
Committee on Un-Ameri- Tactics of World Communism. Part 1. Com- 
rican Activities. munism Outside the U. S. Section D: Com- 
munist Activities Around the World. 84th 
Congress, second session. Washington: U. S. 
Gov't. Printing Office, 1946. 553 pp. 

* U. S. Congress. Senate. The Communist Party of the United States of 
Subcommittee to Investi- America-. What It Is; How It Works; A 
gate the Administration of Handbook for Americans. 84th Congress, 
the Internal Security Act second session. Washington: U. S. Gov't, 
and other Internal Se- Printing Office, 1956. 101 pp. 

curity Laws. 

* U. S. Congress. Senate The Technique of Soviet Propaganda. 
Committee on the Judiciary. Report. 86th Congress, second session. 
Subcommittee to Investi- Washington: U. S. Gov't. Printing Office, 
gate the Administration of I960. 38 pp. 

the Internal Security Act 
and other Internal Se- 
curity Laws. 



(*) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

44 



Van Rauch, Georg. A History of Soviet Russia. New York: Frederick 

A. Praeger, 1962, 

* Vernadsky, George. A History of Russia. New Haven: Yale University 

Press, 1961. 512 pp. 

Walker, Richard L. China Under Communism. New Haven: Yale Uni- 
versity Press, 1955. 

Weidle, Vladimir. Russia-. Absent and Present. New York: Random 

House, 1961. 

Weingast, David E. This is Communism. New York: Oxford Book 

Co., 1961. 178 pp. 

Wetter, Gustav A. Dialectical Materialism. New York: Fred Praeger, 

1958. 

* Whitehead, Don. The FBI Story: A Report to the People. New York: 

Random House, 1956. 

* Whiting, Kenneth R. The Soviet Union Today. New York: Frederick 

A. Praeger, Inc., 1962. 504 pp. 

Wiiliamstown Workshop. A Program for Improving Bill of Rights Teach- 
ing in High Schools. New York: Civil Liber- 
ties Educational Foundation, Inc., 1962. 138 pp. 

Wolfe, Bertram. Khrushchev and Stalin's Ghost. New York: Frederick 

A. Praeger, 1957. 

Wolfe, Bertram. Six Keys to the Soviet System. Boston: Beacon Co., 

1956. 

* Yesipov, B. P. and Goncharov, N. K. J Want to be Like Stalin. 

(translated by George S. Counts and Nucia P. Lodge). 
New York: The John Day Co., 1947. 150 pp. 

* Zagoria, Donald S. The Sino-Soviet Conflict. Princeton, N. J.: Prince- 

ton University Press, 1962. 



(*) Denotes book referred to in the teaching guide. 

45 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF FILMS 

* BACKFIRE " American Economic-Foundation 
CHINA UNDER COMMUNISM" ~~~ ~~~ Encyclopaedia Britannica Films 

"'COMMUNISM Coronet Films 

COMMUNIST BLUEPRINT FOR United World Films 
CONQUEST 

DEFINING DEMOCRACY , Encyclopaedia Britannica Films 

IRON CURTAIN LANDS Grover-Jennings Productions 

LIFETIME OF THE SOVIET MEN Indiana University 

* NIGHTMARE IN RED McGraw-Hill 

* OUR BASIC CIVIL RIGHTS Coronet Films 
PEOPLES OF THE SOVIET UNION McGraw-Hill 

* PRODUCTIVITY, KEY TO PLENTY Encyclopaedia Britannica Films 
RED CHINA McGraw-Hill 

RUSSIA International Film Bureau 

* RUSSIAN LIFE TODAY - INSIDE THE Bailey Films 

SOVIET UNION 

SOVIET RUSSIA: FROM REVOLUTION McGraw-Hill 
TO EMPIRE 

* SOVIET UNION: LAND & PEOPLE Coronet Films 

THE FACE OF RED CHINA McGraw-Hill 

THE FIRST MOSCOW PURGE TRIALS McGraw-Hill 

THE RUSSIAN COMMUNIST REVO- Indiana University 
LUTION 

WHAT DOES THE WORD COMMU- Indiana University 
NISM MEAN TO YOU 



(*) Denotes films referred to in the teaching guide. 

These films are available to Delaware schools from the Delaware State 
Film Library, State Department of Public Instruction, Dover, Delaware. 

46 



TEACHERS NOTES 



***»* N0TEg 



'"S. 



THE FULL COMMITTEE FOR THE STUDY OF MATERIALS FOR 
TEACHING ABOUT COMMUNISM IS COMPOSED OF:- 



Miss Dorothy Allen 

Teacher of Social Studies, Dept. Head 

Alexis L duPont High School 

Mrs. Dortha H. Cannon 

Librarian 

Georgetown High School 

Mr. James W. Cluck 

Principal 

Rehobbth High School 

Senator Reynolds duPont 
Delaware State Senate 

Col. John P. Ferguson 
Superintendent 
Delaware State Police 

Mr. Paul Hodgson 

Asst. State Supt., Vocational Education 

Dept. of Public Instruction 

Mr. J. Hershey Keene 

Teacher of Social Studies 

Mt. Pleasant Senior High School 

Dr. H. L. Klopping 

Research Associate 

Industrial & Biochemicals Dept. 

E. L du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

THE PILOT TEACHERS WERE: 

Miss Dorothy Allen 
Teacher of Social Studies, Dept. Head 
^Alexis L duPonr High School 

Mr. Randall Broyles^ 
Teacher of Social Studies 
Seaford High School 

Mr. Thomas Butterly 
Teacher of Social Studies 
Rehoboth High School 

Mr. James O. Handy 
Teacher of Social Studies 
William C. Jason High School 

April, 1963 



Dr. Marshall Knappen 
Professor of History & 
Political Science 
University of Delaware 

Professor Paul Mabry 

Asst. Professor of Philosophy 

Delaware State College 

Dr. George R. Miller, Jr. 
State Superintendent 
Dept. of Public Instruction 

Mr. James B. Owen 

Teacher of Social Studies 

Newark Central Junior High School 

Dr. Howard E. Row, Chairman 
Asst. State. Supt., Secondary Education 
Dept. of Public Instruction 

Dr. David H. Shelton 
Asst. Prof. Economics & 
Business Administration 
University of Delaware 

Mr. Matthew Sullivan 

Teacher of Social Studies & Guidance 

Henry C Conrad High School 



Mr. William Hearne 
Teacher of Social Studies 
William C Jason High School 

Mr. J. Hershey Keene 
Teacher of Social Studies 
MtTTPleasant- Senior High School 

Mr. James B. Owen 

Teacher "of Social Studies 

Newark Central Junior High School 

Mr. Matthew Sullivan 

Teacher of Social Studies & Guidance 

Henry C Conrad High School 



OPTIONAL fOKM NO. 10 



1\JIE] 

Memorandum 



UNITED STATES GOVE1 



TO 



FROM : 



subject: 



Mr. DeLoach 



MUOpfyef 



date: 6-11-63 



"THEJ^HALLENGE-OF OUR TIMES : DEMOCRACY 
FACES COMMUNISM, " TEACHING OUTLINE PREPARED 
BY STATE OF DELAWARE, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC- 
INSTRUCTION 




By letter 6-6-63, SAC, Baltimore has sent the B 
of captioned booklet which were furnished bv J?r._How ard E./rh p 



Bureau two copies 



Superinte ndent ofeD elaware's Department of Public Instruction. 

a la uJaAP 



pw, Assistant 




• V-T 



BACKGROUND: 






J"»XL W QA in i rti 
''THE CHALLENGE OF-OtJR TIMESHjjW 



In December, 1962, Dr. Row wrote the Director advising that his 
Department was ^preparing a guide for teachers for use in teaching about communism 
in the^pubfpS scn'bols in Delaware. He asked for permission to quote brief, excerpts 
from ^Masters of Deceit. " SAC, Baltimore was instructed to contact Row and 
advise him that the Director had nonobjection to his use of these excerpts and 
suggested that he might find "A Study of Communism" helpful also. Dr. Row at 
that time advised that he, would furnish the Bureau a copy of the finished document 
\ for our information. 

■» 

A reyie.w o^tJus' document reflects that it is. the work^f trie* - 
Committee on the Study of Materials for Teaching About Communism^under.the- 
leadership of Dr. Row. It is in topical outline form and stresses as»its^o.bjective 
the developing of the students' appreciation of our democracy and fEeir understanding 
of the'clomniunist challenge in order to combat it effectively. Discussion „of American 
democratic' ideals and practices is included, as well as a section on the development 
of -communism, its beliefs and its practices. A comparison of concepts of 
democracy and communism is discussed, as well as the various ways in which the 
individual can combat communism. Tj^p^mhtet concludes with a Glossary of 
Communist Double Talk. W L^^L^L2^33, 

On page 28 appears the quotation from "Mastersj^f ^c|^y g ^rning ^.^ 
against v)$l|afcte^&iitii& This is the quotation which.Row was, .given permissi^n^ 

1 - Mr. Sullivan 3 
JVA:ear s fl/*r 

< 6 )56Jl/Li 





\! 




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♦<- » * *^ 



(3 6 



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v» 



M. A. Jones to DeLoach 

Re: "THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIMES: DEMOCRACY FACES COMMUNISM" 



to reprint. Page 30 lists under "Suggested Activities" that students take a 
guided tour of FBI Headquarters in Washington. Page 18 and 29 list "Masters 
of Deceit" under "Suggested Reading,", and page 31 notes that Mr. Hoover's book 
contains a glossary of communist jargan. Page 41 includes both "Masters of 
Deceit" and "A Study of Communism" in the bibliography. Don Whitehead's 
book, "The FBI Story, " is listed on page 45 of the bibliography. 

RECOMMENDATION: 

For information. 




**. IL 



- 2 - 








6 



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June 21, 1063 



Mr. 

ChieT : 

Division of Law 

Bureau of Securities 

Department of Law and Public Safety 

Room 607 

744 Broad Street 

Newark 2, New Jersey 



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o 

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Dear, Mr. 



When .Mr, Hoover returned to the city, he read 
your letter of June 11th and asked me to thank you for your 
offer to be of assistance. 

In response to your request, he autographed the 
copy of "Blasters of Deceit" to Miss Hoar, and it is being returned 
to you under separate cover. 

Sincerely yours, 



-bo 
b7C 




4 





Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 




Tojlsfoa —. 

Belmont ^. 

Mohr- 

Casper «. 
Callahan \ 
Conrad _ 
DeLoach . 
Evans _ 

Gale 

Rosen ._. 
Sullivan - 
Tavel 



<* Ttojter 



TWt. Room _, 
Holmes* * «J 
Gandy^ 



i Newark (94- 
Reurairtel 6-17^63 
NOTE: Inasmuch as Bufiles contained nothing identifiable with Miss Hoar, it ■ 
-r-2 was deemed appropriate to have the field make inquiries concerning her. Files 
—.indicate relations in -June? &e£,*with| brfa former Special Agent 

-^-(EOD ll-3-47,1resifene% 5-20-54), web=an5IFstrained due to a misunderstanding 
^_ over his departments submission .of identification name checks. 
=(see next page) tjg£ ^ W ' '-JA****'''* 

-r- RVA.:ms, (4) \ u&CiO V*W * ct^° \ * J \ 



MAO, ROOM IZI1 TELEfyPE UNIT CH 



JUL 1 1963 



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fc 












Mr, 



**:*** 



This, however, was resolved by correspondent at that time. 

The field was. also asked to advise Bureau of their current relations 

withl 



KTewark advised that nothing, derogatory is lenown 
concerning Miss Hoar who is retired after serving her adult 
l}fe in the Jersey City- School System. She and her family enjoy 
ah e xcellent reputation. Newark.also advised that overall/relatioris 
withl I are .cordial. 



It is noted 



be 

b7C 



_^^^ refers to JElizabeth Hoar as "jMftss, u 
but the^field c^lls her "Mrs. ?I "Miss" is deemed appropriate so as to give 
no indication a check was.made. 



-a-. 




/ 



*Tov. 12-13-56) 



c 



o 



F B I 



Date: 6/17/63 



Transmit the following in 



Via 



AIRTEL 



(Type in plain text or code) 

Regular 



(Priority "or Method of Mailing) 



TO: DIRECTOR, FBI 

FROM: SAC, NEWARK (94r- 

SUBJECT: ELIZABJBTiL-C J^BQAR t 
_ JEBSEY^CITY^ " 




NEWARK, N. J.", 

RESEARCH (CORRESPONDENCE AND TOURS) 

BUDED: 6/19/63 







Re Buairtel to Newark 6/14/63. /V)a.STg.rS F &€&£ 



st<= 



Mrs. ELIZABETH C. HOAR is known to SA EUGENE F. 
COYLE, presently assigned to the Newark Office of the FBI. 
SA COYLE relates she is from one of the older families in 
Jersey City and that she, as well as her family, have been 
devout parishoners of the St. John RC church in Jersey City, 
for many years. 

She has been in the teaching profession all of 
her adult life and recently retired after serving as a 
principal in the Jersey City School System. She and her 
family enjoy an excellent reputation. 



It 



he 

hlC 



Overall relations with former SA 



are cordial 



y 



\ j 



There is no fceasonsknovra to the Newark Office 



* ~i , . 

why the Bureau should not comply with 
in reair.tel, 

IV 

~3~)3ureau 
T^Newark 
RMS:rac 
(4) 




Approve? 



/ Special Agent in Charg 











%■ 




July 5, i963 



WbT%£ . itn/<27?~*2-(7« i * 




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•" 



MiSS _ 



cgi/ Cas^. New York 
x^ Dear Misa| 



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Your' letter of June 28, 1963j has been received 
during Mr. Hoover's absence, from the city. 

Mr. Hoover does not maintain a supply of ''Masters 
of Deceit" for distribution. In the event you cannot obtain this book 
at your local bookstore, you might correspond ^th the publisher* 
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Incorporated, 383 Madison Avenue, 
New York 17, New York. 

Sincerely yours, 






Tolson „ 
Belmont 
Mohr 



^.COMM-FBI 




Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 



NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in Bureau files. 
SAWrmlh (3) 



fcSI 



c^gEcai wv*f u^a\y 



•Callahan 

'Conrad^— . 
DeLoach . 
' Evans « - 








Gale ._ 
Rosen ^_ 
SuHivan . 
Tavel «. 
Trotter _ 
Tele. H< 
Holmes 
jGandy f 



*-? 



BULl5l96a ^>^ 



"MAIL ROOM CD TELETYPE UNIT □ 



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Castile, New York 
June 28, 1963 



United States Department of Justice 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washingon 25, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 



O 



Would you please send me a cbpy of " Masters 
of Deg giil' by J* Edgar Hopver, published by Holt, Rinehart and * 
Wilson, Inc. , New York, New York. 

If you would send me a charge for the book I 
will send the money. Thank You! 

Sincerely yours. 

Miss 



Addr ess per envelope: 
Miss I 

Middle Reservation Rd. 
Castile, New York 



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flatty 19G3 1 *** 
^Lfrh. rh. J. S-fo-f-zs QzpQfir >n**r of Justice 

»L "/Harris- oPDzeeif U J.fidW IWfc, 



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JulyS, 19SS 



Miss| 

'General Manager 
Eadio Station WBMG 
620 East Ward Street 
Douglas, Georgia 



Bear Miss 



Your letter of June 29th has been 
received, and I appreciate your kind comments. 
It is indeed encouraging to note your interest in 
seeking to alert others to the dangers of communism. 

I have no objection to the use of 
eseerpts from my books for broadcast purposes; 
however* you should also contact the publisher, 
Holt, Einehart and Winston, inc. , 383 Madison 
Avenue, New York 3.7, New York, .for permission.. 



Sincerely yours, 
J- Edgat Hoouec 




1 - Savannah - Enclosure 



V $ 



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NOTE: By letter 6-10-63, Special Agent Robert Kieffer of the^Savannah 
Offic e requeste d that the Director autograph a copy of each book fo^-' 



Miss | | who, he indicated, was an excellent friend ofjhe Bureau and 

in a position to be of great assistance when needed. The Director f 
autographed the books for her on 6-13-63. It is felt we should offer no 
objection, but indicate ithat she should also obtain the publisher's^ 
permission, io ii&e excerpts from the Director' s books. "^ 

JVA:earo.^v c^-;-^i . y " *«• 3 

(7) *EC>0 W 



U00» 



Gale 

Rosen 

Sulli 

Tavd 

TrotteT 

Tele. Roo: 

Holmes _ 

Gandy ^A^ 










MAIL ROOM 



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TELETYPE UNIT 



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y ' s^t&dios aNd offices 

PHONE EV 4-32SO 



' Mr, Tolzonh 




OOO KIUOCYCUEG SOOO WATTS 

ofke voice of the South Qeorgia ibmptre 



I wn Tolsonk 
626 east w>s| Mr. Belmont 

DOUGLAS, GEJ *f r * Mohr 

I Mr. Casper^. 
1 JJr. Caliban. 

, Wr./Rf an5 

f Mr. Rosen .. 

/ Mr. SuII;vaa_ 

Mr. Tavel._ 
, Mr, -Trotter | 

Tele, Room 

Af fa* ir*i. 



J Miss Holmes^ 
J Miaa Grady ^3? 




June 29, 1963 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D. C- 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

j& am extremely grateful for the autographed copies of your books, 
C^Masters of Deceit" and n A Study of Communism. " I appreciate, 
io^iSSlsSSSaBS3B m V£ Mr. -Bob Kieffer in alerting you to my interest. 

If your copyright permits, would you allow direct quptations, with 
appropriate credits, of course, for broadcast purposes ? 

Your publications provide the most concise and comprehensive 
information available to us and would, therefore, make invaluable 
contributions to our public service series on Communism.. 

All America is indebted to you for your exposure of the Communist 
threat, and, certainly, for the never ending attack you wage on its 
forces. * " 



Cordially yours, 



WDMG RADIO 







102 oO*. ! 



General Manager 










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July 10, 1963 



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Charleston 2T, West Virginia 






Dear Mr. 



so 
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30 

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Tfqur letter of July 5th and the accompanying 
copies of the "Civitan Chatter" have been received. X deeply 
appreciate your interest in my book, "Masters of Deceit, " 
and I want to express my sincere appreciation for your 
thoughtfulness in writing. 

It v/as a pleasure for me to furnishyou the 
publications on communism to which you referred. In this 
regard* I have made arrangements for you to, receive on a 
continuing basis material this Bureau is privileged to 
disseminate. 

Sincerely yours, 

5.,Efga1:.Hoovei: 

NOTE: Correspondent wrote in March-of 1962 and commented quite 
favorably concerning "Masters of Deceit. " He inquired as to where 
copies might be obtained and on 3-12-62 he was referred to the 
publishers. At that time Jie was furnished five articles on communism, 
one of v/hich was reprinted in serial form in the copies of the "Civitan, 
Chatter" he.has now sent. Th^Civitan Chatter" is a publication of the 
Charlestbnjcivitah Club arid is a newsletter-type publication. " 

MrT] Es editor. Ue was added to the Special Correspondents' 

List on this date. 



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Mr. Tolson.. 
Mr. Belmoi; 
Mr. Mohr.. 
Mr, Casper- 
Mr. Callahan.. 
Mr. Conrad./ — 




1017 PARK VIEW, BELVIL PARK 
SAINT ALBANS. WEST VIRGINIA 



Daniel Boone Chapter 

July 5, 1963 



Mr. Uosen 

Mr. Sullivan... 

Mr. Tavel 

Mr. Trotter-.- 
Tele. Room — 
Miss Holmes.- 
Miss Gandy — 



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Honorable, J. Edgar Hoover 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D. C 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

I wish to thank you for sending me the material on the 
subject of Communism and it, has been passed around among our 
members* Dd?ftig<the past school year we presented a copy of 
your book, /^Masters of Decei t" to every high* school in Kanawha 
County and they were glad to get it in every case. 

Enclosed are some copies of the ""Civitan Chatter" in 
which I ran a column entitled, "Masters of Deceit, and I hope it. 
may have stimulated the thinking of the members. 




JEB:bj 

Enclosures k>t 





Box 1986 : 

Charleston 27, West Virginia 



11 JUL "^1963 




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CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINfA 

LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL (BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI 4-l6ll 



August '31, 1962 



PROGRAM FOR THIS WEEK : "MY YEAR OF ACTIVE DUTY WITH THE WEST VIRGINIA NATIONAL GUARD" 
will be the Subject of the Guest Speaker : MR. BOB JONES of Harris Upham & Company of 
our City. (Mr. Jones just recently returned from a year of active duty with the Guard). 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN : John Wesley, in his old age, after having read, and read, and re- 
read the Bible all his life, said of himself: "I am a man of one book." The truth 
will surely slip, if you do not refresh your mind constantly reading and meditating in 
the Bible. The Bible is God's recipe for making holy people. You must follow the 
recipe exactly, if you want to be a holy, Christlike person. The Bible is God's guide- 
book to show men the way to Heaven. You must pay strict attention to its directions, 
and follow them accurately, if you are ever to get there. - - - - Major Robert Burchett 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK : When anyone has offended me, I try to raise my soul so high that 
the offense cannot reach it. - - - - Descartes 



BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations , Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 

Shelby Parkins .-- August' 31 H. W. Gresham 

C. E. Roberts, Sr. -- August 31 



September 2 



NOTES OF APPRECIATION : "Your kind expression of sympathy is gratefully acknowledged 
and deeply appreciated." "The Family of Alexander H. Heck thank you very much." Mr. 
&Mrs. W. J. Hess 

SEATING ARRANGMMTS : Resignations:^ John A. Bickel, Table No. 1, moved to Scottsdale, 
Arizona .. 



[ 



SICK BAY : Civitan Roe Wingett is a patient at the Charleston Memorial Hospital. Best 
Wishes from all for a speedy recovery * 

CIVITANS IN THE NEWS : Stopped by the office of Stewart R. McKalip, architect,, the 
other day to get cool. The buildings he designs are good looking, and so- is he....... 

Dropped by the Point Express Office but genial Bill Hanks happened to be. out* ....... 

Wally Barron congratulated F. Ray Power on the fine showing T of our State Vocational 
Rehabilitation Department, however, Mr. Power gives the Governor much of *the credit as 

he gave the Department his whole-hearted support. 7 Paul Jefferson, capable bead of 

'the Social Security Office here, cautions us to beware of crooks who claim that for a ""; 

consideration they can get our payments increased . . We heard that O.K. Cantrell has 

purchased the Capitol City Body Works -- Best of luck,, O.K. .....Mr. Civitan, Charlie 

Roberts, Sr., may now be called Preacher Roberts -- he preached Saturday, at the Seventh- 
Day Adventist Church -- he can do it, we've heard him Don Roberts, C & P Telephone 

executive from Washington is in town and may be at the Meeting, Friday Frank Litton 

was seen enjoying a meal at the Glass House in Beckley, Sunday Night. Those Litton boys 
know all about food and its preparation. Your editor was* in St. Pete several years ago 
with Dr. Arthur Litton and we visited one of their Dog Wagons. The next thing we knew, 
Dr. Litton was behind the counter telling the chef how to cook and he knew what he vps ^^ 

t * mngatout ENCLOSURE <^/d^;?-X 




**** 



ATTENTION MONITORS : Fresi^t Cliff Flannery suggests tha^be Monitors be responsible ' 
for getting news items from their Tables each week. We think this is a sple'ndid idea 
and if you have to be absent, ask someone at your Table to,, get the news for you. . Sheets 
of paper will be on your" Table each week. - - We are counting on you, MONITORS. 

THE BIG PICNIC : If you were among those missing the Civitan Picnic last Friday, you 
missed an evening of good fellowship with your Civitan brother and his family. There 
were-games for ~young aM~bl<r alike, in facty sometimes ~it~was~difficult to tell the " 
young from the old. Of course food makes a picnic and any of the one hundred and fifty 
people attending will tell you there was plenty of good hot food. Now Hank Bias might 
tell you there wasn't any salt, but we found it, Hank, after you finished eating. Sorry. 

We owe a Big Thanks to Gene Anderson . Civitan Enter tainmerit Chairman,, who did all the 
planning and when it comes to planning and serving, Gene knows all the answers. You 
should have seen that table loaded with luscious homemade cakes, all made by members of 
the Civinettes, as were the hotdogs,, cold slaw and green beans. Thanks to each of you 
for your donations and help in making the Picnic a Big Success . - - — 

Civinette Helen Flannery 

"MASTERS OF DECEIT " : Rothwell E. Dewey, Club President 19^8-49, an executive with the 
Kanawha Valley Bank, is active in many Civic affairs. Recently he helped put on a pro- 
gram for us and flashed the picture of J. Edgar Hoover on the screen. This reminded us 
of the book entitled "Masters of Deceit" which Mr. Hoover wrote in 1958. Have you read 
it? If not, we suggest that you read it carefully. You can get a copy at the library 
or buy a paper back copy for .50^ at your newstand. Here's what some papers say about 
it: "Indispensable - r the most -author it ative^book ever written on Communism in America." 

New York Times "This is the most important - indeed the most imperative - book of 

the decade — powerful and informative and up-to-date." — Christian Herald 

"Every thinking, patriotic American should give heed." ~ Philadelphia Enquirer 

Our F.B.T. Chief has said this: "Every Citizen has a duty to learn more about the 
menace that threatens his future, his home, his children, the peace of the world -- 
and that is why I have written this book." - - - - To be continued next week. 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES : One of the most important things that we must do be- 
fore the Centennial begins is to clean-up our State and keep it clean. This project 
has been called thfe "Clean-up of The Century" and a lot of 1 * credit should go to our 
own member, W. W. Barron, for the tremendous strides we have already made in this 
campaign: As^we know, Wally promised to do all in his power, to ciean-up West Virginia, 
when he was a candidate for the Office of Governor and we are happy to say that he has . 
really kept his word. We go on short trips every week- and we, have never seen our high- 
ways so clean and beautiful. Litter barrels are being placed on the side of the roads, 
with signs telling where they are. Roadside Parks with plenty of Litter Barrels are 
going in most everywhere and we hear that more are coming. - - - - 

To be continued next week . 

CHATTER CHEESE: Waite Hoyt, genial radio announcer for the Cincinnati Ball Club tells 
this one : A young rrian was dating a pretty widow who had five children and things were 
getting near the proposing stage wliien a friend called "him and said, "You had better be 
careful, if you take one step further, you will be a step-father." 

A barber surveyed the slick hair of the young man who had just seated himself in his 
chair. Then he asked: "Do you want it cut or should I just change the oil?" 

SAFETY NOTE; "God takes care of fools and drunks," is an old saying — Please don't 
try it out on the Labor Day Week End! 



BRING YOUR FRIENDS" TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB. 1 



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CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



September 7, V}62 



Editor, Joe B. Bedinger, DI l*-l6ll. 

P. 0* Box, 1986, Charleston, West Virginia 

PROGRAM FOR THIS WEEK: MR. HARRY BRAWLEY of Radio WCHS will be the Guest Speaker and 

" his subject will be : 

"CHARLESTON IN THE PAST U 

Mr. Brawley has assembled a number of pictures of Charleston in the past years which 
will be shown, and he has an excellent commentary to accompany the pictures. Everybody 
will want,, to be present for this treat. 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN: Many people say they are fighting the devil, who do not know what 
fighting the devil means. It 'is a fight of faith, in which the soul takes btold .of the 
promise, of God, and holds on to it, and believes it, and declares It to be true Jn 
spite of all circiimstances and, feelings to the contrary, and in which it obeys\God, . 
whether God seems to be fulfilling the promise or not. One can get out of the Togs, 
and mists, and twilight of doubt and uncertainty, into the broad day of perfect ^assur- 
ance simply "-living by faith." Major Robert Burchett 



THOUGHT JOR THE .WEEK; A smooth sea never made s a .good sailor^ „- - - - Oren Arnold 
BIRTHDAY^: .Congratulations, Best 'Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 
Don 0. Hays -- * September 8 



James M. Hopper 



/ 






September 8 



WELCOME NEW , MEMBERS: Truman Walrod, WCAW Radio, 3^3-7503, Table No. I, Transfer from 
Whiteville,^ M. C. Club -- Sponsor: E. C. Flannery 

r* '" , ,," ; * * " * . * ■ *>>*,* 

CIVITAN DORMT Civitan Club voted last Friday, to give $2,500.00 to apply on the 
"Civitan Dorm." This makes a total of $5*000.00 this year and a total of' $15,000.00 
on this, project. We are morally obligated for a total of $25,000.00. . .and this "One 

Hundred' Fifty Thousand^Dream Dorm" will be '"all ours" for the kids to enjoy. 

Clyde Murdoch (our T - contractor) .announces the purchase of ^bronze plaque telling 
Charleston that the new "Dorm" is a Civitan* project. It should be on the wall for the 
"grand, opening . " . ' r 

Y.M.C.A. George Williams announces the Y.M.C.A. Membership Drive -- September 10th - 
28th. Phil Dupont is Civitan representative. The theme is "KEEP FIT." Join now for 
a longer, and. happier. life. - , 

SAFETY NOTE: There's a line on the ocean which ,by crossing you can lose a day. Caere's 

one on the highway where you pan do * even better. John C -Frazier, Safety ^Director, 

Appalachian , Power .Co., 

CHATTER CHEESE: Here's a sure sign of old age, when the gleam in your eye is from the 

sun hitting your bifocals. 

By the time you have money to burn, the fire has gone out. "SMILES/ 1 GjJl? 



CIVITANS 'IN THE NEWS: W. y°Bill" Byus, Jr. and his charnQ; secretary have returned •' 
from their vacation -- visited Gettysburg and Hershey, Pennsylvania, and Richmbnd, Va. 

Had a fine time Pat Vallan&ingham and C. E. Roberts, Sr. played golf together 

last Wednesday at 'Sleepy Hollow... ;Delfcert Stout is starting bowling this week at 

Kanawha City.. v . .. .Jack Vallandzngham made the news the other day when he landed in a 
tree over the highway in Teays Valley « he's got plenty of nerve and we take our hats 

off to him. . . . ... .Paul Jefferson has moved to his new address,^ 1206^Quarrier Street 

Leslie Darr Price and Harry R. Howell visited West Virginia Wesley^ . ./V. . //Lowell Bond 
Is* on vacation 1 .. 1 .*..^; We, of 'Table #2 were honored -to breafe bread" with Dr. Ross Culpepper 
— He. i r s always welcome. . . . ; . . .Horace A. "Happy" Pierce, 'Charter Member and Club President 
1932-1933, is Judge Prank Taylor's right hand man at the Circuit Court -- he also is at 
home in the C9iranbn Pleas Courts when they need help. (He's a goqd man -- born at Suffolk, 
Va\ )V;v'.*.\; .Our* thanks to CivineittS 'Helen Flaiinery ifor* the i;rit£ -up about the picnic* 

We think that a Civinette Column each week would be fine /.Albert F.* Good} Preside*^ 

of the fabulous Shenandoah Downs, .will be in Charleston on business this Friday 

LAST WEEK'S PROGRAM: Bob Jones, stock broker from Harris Upham &*(&., gave us an inter- 
esting program of his experiences and observations during the past ten months, while 
serving on active duty with the West Virginia National Guard. We all share Bob's con- 
cern for the welfare and security^ of our country and we should certainly support the 
Reserve Program 100$. - - - - RMS 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS: "This is:' : to thank you for placing my name on your mailing list to 
receive "Civitan Chatter" and to tell you I think it is an excellent source of infor- 
mation. ^ With best wishes ibr a very successful Civitan Year and assuming you of my 
cooperation at 'all tiimes, I am, 'Civitanly yours, John R, Pate, ;k. ',!)'. V Internktional V.P., 
Zone 3, Arlington 5> Virginia. 

WEST, VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES: ^Continued from last week) 

West Virginia's countryside, highways, rural and urban communities should certainly 
present themselves at their best to the State's own citizens and many thousands of 
visitors who we know are going to travel throughout the State during the Centennial 
Year. Certainly if one gives a Birthday Party the house should be clean. We have 
notices that some drivers who would not think of throwing a newspaper out of the car 
will flip their cigarette butts on the street. Every LITTER-BIT HURTS, they say on 
TV. We need the help b*f every single person in the State to get the ^ob done. What 
can we do? Appeal to the pride of 'those who may be littering, things up and set a 
good example for them, and talk, talk, talk it up every place we go. 

HELP KEEP WEST VIRGINIA CLEAN AND GREEN! 

"MASTERS OF DECEIT 1 ^ : Recently we asked a minister why it is that some preachers seem 
to rail ttte communist line. He answered, "Well the Communist Party believes in many 
of the same things, that the Church of Christ believes in." We didn't faint but were 
really surprised that a man of his education would make such a statement. We simply 
asked him if he 1 had read "Masters of Deceit," by J. Edgar Hoover and he said that he 
had not. We suggested that he read it carefully and he said that he would. We, then 
wrote Mr. Hoover and he sent us some literature and we gave some of it which pertained 
to the churches, to the- minister.* He read the literature and then asked if he could 
keep it. We know that now he has found out what the Communists mean when they say they 
want peace. What gets us is that some editors, T.V. , radio announcers seem to accept 
everything that the Russian's say tHey have done as the gospel truth whether we can 
verify it or not. If we believe what they say and pass it on as the truth, then we are 
pleasing Mr. K. very much. Our Civitan Magazine for March, 1962 carried this quotation 
from one of Mr. Hoover's speeches,, "Beware of those who preach that Americans should 
never be first in anything but disarmament and demobilization! We are at War with the 
Communists, and the sooner each redblooded American realizes that, the better and safer 
we all will be." (To be continued next week) 



BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE FRIEpLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUBJ 



_j 




CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1.925 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 
LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI k-.l6ll 

P. '0. Box 1986, Charleston, West Virginia 



September it, 1962 



PROGRAM FOR (THIS WEEK : As we go to press, . our Program .Committee has not yet made a 
decision on what our Program will "be this Friday* 

SEE SECOND PAGE 
CHAPLAIN IS COLUMN : "There is a spiritual bankruptcy, as there is a pecuniary one. 
I may become so eager to help the poor, that -I indiscriminately give away all my 
property, and so become a pauper myself. Likewise I may be so eager to help souls, 
that I give away all my spiritual capital. I talk, and talk, without' waiting on 
God to fill me. This is folly. We should wait to be clothed with spiritual power 
from on high. We should take time to hear what the Lord will say; then speak so 
much as He gives us to speak, and no more." - - - - Major Bur f chett 



THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK: 



Let thy speech be better than silence or be silent., 
^ « 1 - - Dionysius the Elder 



BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 



Denzil Gainer 

Lynn Martin 



-- September 12 
— September ,10 

Bruce Thompson, Jr. 



A. H. Pruett, ;Jr. ' 
Walton Shepherd 
« September 16 



— September 14 
-- September Ik' 



CIVITANS IN THE NEWS : Pat Vallandingham was the speaker at a. recent meeting of the 
Men of the Church at the Village Chapel, where he made a strong appeal for men to 
hold firm to the great tfuffiiTof "our faith: . . • ;. . ."TTIaffy R. Howell", Charter Member, 
and Club President 1933-193^ resigned as City Auditor and Budget Director, but we 
understand that the Mayor persuaded him to stay on for a while longer. We don't 
blame the City fpr wanting Harry to stay on as it would be impossible to find a 
more capable, efficient and honest man. In this day pf shady ^political dealings, 
it is 'refreshing to see a man of Harry's character in a position of public trust. 

........ Sat at the 1 -table with ' Truman Walrod o f WCAW -,- Welcome Tarheel 1 ' 

H. T. Alabaugh used to yprk in 'tKeTlastern " Panhandle and if you want to know about 

Morgan, Berkeley and ^Jefferson Counties — just ask him... Jim L. Bailey of 

the Guaranty Savings & Loan Company says that business, is pretty good Paul 

Jefferson is ill — must have worked too hard in moving — hope he recovers soon 

We are happy that C. Roe Wingett is improving. ...... . It was Charles Town 

that- Albert G66d ; visited? ■*- hope h'e was lucky witfr the 'horses. ♦.♦;.*.-♦ 

LAST WEEK'S PROGRAM : Mr. Harry Brawley entertained the Members of our Club with 
his recollection pf the\ odors and sounds of Charleston shortly after the turn' of 
the century. His pieties "brought smiles of delight id many of the members who 
vividly recalled the old post office, churches, State House, etc. - - - - RMS ami/**} 

U-/» W?- 3-?r 3 

BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITM,-r^HEi-iFRIENDLY;.FMILY SERVICE CLUB I 



Q ■_ ■' - Ar-p — ^*- ; '^ - ; ^ 

VOTER REGISTRATION : Raymon Young, pur efficient Civitan in charge, of Kanawha County 
Permanent Registration Office has this to* say) "If you have moved, it is time to'reg- ( 
ister or transfer your registration if you want to vote in this coming November 6th 
election; October 6th is the last chance to' register or transfer your registration i 

for this coming election." The right to vote is our most precious possession -^ ^ J 

~pebple^inTha^ are not sure -- check 

with Ramon. Incidently,, Mrs. H. H^ Chinn^is Ramon's assistant ^aiid she really^ knows 
the business. f 

CIVITAN DORM :. Clyde Mur dock looked happy* holding up that check last Friday. Prom 
the; Union ^.MissioniNews^cWe^copy 'tKisV / "fantastic -. mbelievable - amazing' No. , 
superlatives can ever describe what has been accomplished. The new building has 
been appraised &b around four times the amount that has been invested in.it." We 
wish to thank Clyde for sending us a copy of the Union Mission News which had many 
pictures of the new Civitan Dorm. Grand Opening soon. 

SAFETY NOTE : There can be no neutrals in the war on accidents. Either you help 
with the solution or you become part of the problem* - - - - John C. Frazier, 
Safety Director , Appalachian Power Company 

CHATTER CHEESE : She married him for life, and found out he didn't have any. 
Doctor: "Do you smoke cigarettes?" 
Patient: "What else can you do with them?" 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES : ■ Plans for "West Virginia's celebration have been 
building over the terms of three governors. The Centennial Commission, guided by 
the experience of other State Centennials, outlined nearly four years ago, a com- 
plete list ,6f r festivities and! objectives fc>r over '.celebration. These plans and 
their costs were' prepared by Alfred Stei^n of the Department of "Community arid 
Industrial Showmanship of the American National Theatre and Academy. Mr. Stern 
was the consultant of the Seattle and Brussels World's Fairs. Basically, the 
celebration will be stateTwide,, with eye and ear appealing events of all kinds, 
many of them designed to highlight locally planned activities .such as fairs and 
other .events . To achieve these ends, chairmen and committeemen have been en- 
listed in each County. An army of more- than 5,QQ0 volunteers is already working 
on local details of the celebration in c their respective areas, r - ( , -' — 

To^be .continued 

MASTERS OF DECEIT : In Civitan Magazine for Macch, 1962,. we r find the following: 
"J. Edgar Hoover's exposure of Communists takeover tactics, Masters o£ Deceit, 
was distributed; to Orange, County High School seniors by .members of the Winter 
Park, Florida, Civitan Club. The well-known book, used in school classes' as a 
text in many parts of the country, will alsp be given, in bpund form to, Junior 
and Senior High Schopl : li£raries by the Club. .High Schoolers or not, „you are 
missing a bet by missing this book." We hear that the Daniel Boone Chapter of 
the Sons of the American Revolution, is going to order some of theke books to be 
presented to Kanawha County High Schopl' Libraries . If you want a copy just give 
a check for $3 .00 to Payne Brown or your editor. The book costs $5.00 per copy 
but by ordering- over 25 copies, the S.A.R. is getting a reduced rate. Every 
church, -home and school library should have a copy or several copies of this book. 



PROGRAM FOR THIS WEEK : Mr. Donald Britt,. Assistant to the President of Piedmont 
Airlines, wiir present our program. * s '* 







CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor) Joe E. Bedinger, DI lf-l6ll 

PtO. Box 1986, Charleston, W. Va.. 

I 



September 21, 1962 



PROGRAM FOR THIS WEEK : Our guest speaker will be MR. WALTER W. BAKER , Manager, 
General Service Department, Technical Center, Union Carbide and Chemicals 
♦Corporation, South Charleston. He will speak to us about the "Operation of the 
Technical Center." - - - - Bob Sayre 

^ CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN : When God searches for a man in His vineyard, He does not ask, 
"Has he great natural abilities? Is he thoroughly educated? Is he a fine singer? 
Is he eloquent in prayer? Can he talk much?" But rather, He asks, "Is his heart 
perfect toward me? Is he holy? Does he love much? Is he willing to walk by faith, 
and not by sight? Does he love Me so much, arid has he such a childlike confidence 
in My love for him that he can trUst Me to use him when he doesn't see any sign that 
I am using him? Is he meek and lowly in heart, and humble?" - - - - Major J. R. 
Burchett 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK: "What you 'do speaks so loudly that I cannot hear what you 
say." - - - - Unknown 

BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 

Hobert Newcomer - Sept- 17 C Roe Wingett - Sept. 17 

" NOTE OF SYMPATHY : We extend our deepest sympathy -to -Denver- D. Casto on the sudden 
death of his brother, Roy Lee Casto of 23 Arlington Court, Charleston. 

CIVITAN 1 S IN THE NEWS : Caught Dick field's "Record Hop" on WCHS-TV Saturday and 
enjoyed it. We are always looking for a boy of girl that we know in the dance - 
then too, Dick recommends Pepsi-Cola that Pat Vallandingham sells. That Pepsi is 

a good drink - either straight or mixed '. . . .Paul Jefferson is in Room 2U2 

of the Charleston Memorial Hospital and is F in traction part time and treatments 
part time. We wish for Paul a speedy recovery ; Harry Winston spoke be- 
fore the St. Albans Rotary Club last Thursday on the subject, "Handwriting Analysis" 
and they liked it very much - - Also understand that Harry bowled 182 the other 

night Truman Walrod of WCAW secured application papers for the £ons of 

the American Revolution. - - Welcome aboard 1 . We were glad to see Ambrose , 

Painter of Hollywood, Florida ; .Si Broadwater of Motor Car Supply, says that they 

have opened up a new place on Clehdenin *St*. - to .serve us better ..... .Harry R. 

Howell has been selected to serve as General Chairman, 6t the, W. Va. Wesleyan College 
Diamond Jubilee Campaign in the Charleston area to raise funds for additional build- 
ings. We wish Harry the best of success as there is nothing more important in our 
country today than to. maintain and support our small Christian denominational Colleges 

.C. Roe Wingett is out of the hospital and says that he is .feeling f irie. 

We hope to see him soon at our Luncheon Meeting. ....; Joe Spence is a patient at the 
Mountain State Hospital, Room 202 i We all wish you a speedy recovery, Joe 



■fciw 






I 



SEATING ARRANGEMENTS : Resignations: H. K. Kennedy, Table No. 8, Unable to attend 
Meetings .♦...,. 

- LAST-WEEK-'S -PROGRAM: - -Mr .-Donald-B. -Britt, -Assistant- to-the-President-of -Piedmont - 

Airlines, Smith-Reynolds Airport, Winston-Salem, 1TC., spoke to us on air safety 
and traffic and' progress, arid compiiraented Charleston on its fine airport "facilities. 
We saw - a short movie on tfte F*27, which is one of the Piedmont's newer Top Jet 
Airliners. - - r -RS 

^ CIVITAN^DORM :< -Jphn*iS. Lacaria-shas been-appointed**chairman^,of ;the^Coramittee « appointed^ 
to arrange -preparations for the dedication of the *new ^Civitan Dorm at the Union Mission 
Children's Home, together with making plans for "open house," the date of which will 
be announced later. Other members of the Committee appointed are: E.C. Flannesy, 
Dr. G. Butterfield, Henry Chinn, Denver C. Casto, Lloyd Woody, Paul Jefferson, 
'Belford Roberts and Dick Moses. 

Our "builder*- , Clyde Murdock reports that there are a few "minor" last minute details 
to* be completed before the children can: move into our new Dorm. These "minor" de- 
tails include installation of water pipes, bulldozing of grounds and* around a dozen 
other such "minute" details - but "don't worry", says Clyde, "I still say we'll be 
in by the end of September." 

SAFETY NOTE : The number of blasts that come from auto horns in a traffic jam is 
equal to the sum of the squares at the wheel. - - - - John C. Frazi^er, Safety 
Director, A. P. Co. 

CHATTER CHEESE : A man. who has an enjoyable evening with a" beautiful girl who has a 
wonderful figure** often wonders if there- are others' who feel about vthe -way he does. 
Then there was the Scotchman who bought only one spur; He figured if one side of 
the; horse went, the other was- sure to follow. - -> - - Filmock's 

WEST VIRGINIA. CENTENNIAL NOTES : Collectively, it is our job, to/demonstrate our 
State's historical progress and great potential. 

Further, we will dramatize and re-live our history, clean up our cities, teach our 
fellow citizens' facts about: West. Virginia's economy, topography an$ recreational 
facilities, and prepare ourselves generally to pla,y host to the nation in 1963* 
Success for, these goals and the entire Centennial 'depends* on the support from busi- 
ness, industry and every person in the. State, - NOW! We see from the papers that 
the City of Charleston is lagging in their financial support - r Let ' s -Change This 
•Picture - - The CAPITOL CITY Should Be First. '* \ 

MASTERS OF DECEIT : Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, F.B.I, sent us the copy of an Internal 
Security Statement which, he issued "on April 11, 196l. It is as' follows: J 
"The Federal Bureau .p£ Investigation is charged with investigating matters relating 
to the internal security of the United' States . Law enforcement agencies throughout 
the Country are working closely with the F.B.I', in the struggle against espionage, 
sabot age, , and subversive activities. The assistance, .of every law -Abiding person in 
our Nation is. needed, and all patriotic organizations and individuals are requested 
to report information affecting our- internal Security to the F.B.I. Here are some 
suggestions for Individuals and organizations wishing to aid the iF.B.I. "in the 
Internal Security field.' 11 : X^o be 'Continued) 

- BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN^ THE. FRIENDLY' FAMILY SERVICE CLUB1 



/1 




CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST . VIRGINIA 



CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI k-l6ll -, September 28, 1962 

P.O. Box 1986, Charles ton, JWest Virginia 

PROGRAM FOR THIS' WEEK : ; Big Hollywood Movie Production With* Sound 

and Color r -: Entitled: . __ 

" WOMAN'S BEST "DRESSED.- ACCESSORY IS A WELL-DRESSED MAN " 

This Program comes to us through the courtesy of Civitan Lloyd Woody. 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN : *" Do not be surprised if you have very unusual temptations. You 
remember that it was after Jesus was baptized with the Holy Ghost that He was led into 
the wilderness to be tempted by the devil for forty days and forty nights... "The 
disciple is not above* his Master." But when you are tempted, count it all joy. Your 
very trials and temptations will lead you into a deeper acquaintance with Jesus fbr, 
as He was, so are 4 you to be in this present world. Remember 8 He has said; "my grace 
is sufficient for you." - - — Major J. R. Burchett 

J-, 
THOUGHT FOR THEvWEEK : "A man full of words and no deeds 

-Is like a ^garden, full of weeds ."----. Author unknown 

BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and. Many Happy Returns to: 
0. K. Cantrell -September 2k C. L. Ferguson, Jr. -* September 28 

R. V. Douglas -* September 30 H. Ray Hambrick ~ September 27 " 
Israel L. Hark - September 30 - C. A. Lindsay - September 30 
Luther L. -White- —September 2k~ - - 

. WELCOME NEW .-MEMBERS : Mr. -Raymond R. Humphreys, United Mine _ Workers of America,, District 
17, Secretary- Treasurer, Phone No. DI 6-0341, Table No. 8, Sponsor: R'ayrion^.YoungT 

CIVITANS IN THE NEWS : ; VP John S. Lacaria, CPA had his picture in Sunday 1 s paper. He is 
making plans for the W. Va. Tax Institute, Inc. Annual Meeting. ...«). Dan' C. Schneider 

ordered a copy of "Masters of Deceit," by JT. Edgar Hoover ..Forbes R. Clarke, Jr., 

one of a team of 'four has been sent to Sumatra to aid that part of Indonesia become 
self productive in coal. He went with- Paul Weir Company consultants for United Nations... 

Congratulations to Paul -. "its -a Boy" Divers .C. A. Lemkuhl, Jr. of Investors 

Diversified Services, Inc., has been elected Treasurer of the Johnny Appleseed District 
^,of the Barbershop Quartet Society which has 2500 members from Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, 

West Virginia and .part of Maryland Dr. Harry Kessell and mother have been to 

Kentucky State Fair - also went to Chicago to see the Patterson -- Liston* fight Mr. 

Paul Gregory, Manager, Industrial Relations, Tech Center, Union- Carbide has been nomi- 
nated as "Guest of the Week" for last Friday The Charleston* Parachute Club will 

be making an' Exhibition Jump at Kanawha Airport on October 6th in conjunction with a 
"Fly In" for pilots throughout a five state area. , Pat Vallandingham suggests that if 
you happen to fly on> a commercial airline that day be on the lookout for strange objects 

aloft — What a Guy! Robert Ellis, CPA, goes to Jamica,. September 25th on pretense 

of looking into hotel^operations there- JKaye a good trip <| wonder who turned that:£n). 

Bob !Douglas won't talk? / /•'*"'*» &J J **i 



SAFETY NOTE : : Experience ll^pi good teacher, but she chargei^^enty . - - - - John C 
Frazier, Safety Director, A. P. Company. 

LAST WEEK'S PROGRAM : Anybody that missed Friday x s Program, missed a real Eye-Opener. 
Walter Baker of the Tech Center at Union Carbide and Carbon, held his audience spell- 
bound. ----- Bob Sayre , 

CIVITAN DORM : : The Dorm Planning Committee announces October 19 as Dedication Day. 
We will have our regular meeting in our "new" Dorm 1 '. . ..lunch and program. Be sure 
to keep this date open. 

Also,* the following Sunday, October 21*, will be Open House for the public. . Details 
will follow. - - - - Clyde Murdock 

CHATTER CHEESE : Golfer: "I'm anxious to make this shot. That's my mother-in-law 
up on the clubhouse porch." 

Friend: '"Don't be a fool, you can't hit her froirf here. It's 200 yards.". 

Asked if he know anything about raising chickens, the farmer said, "No, but the 
chickens do." - - - - Stailes 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL MOTES : A successful Centennial ^observance in 1963 will more 
closely unify West Virginians - - using a common bond of -our Unique history, our pride 
in our natural and scenic resources. The Centennial Year can renew that spirit of 
loyalty and independence that led us to split with" decisive weight with the Old 
Dominion and cast our decisive weight with the Union in the War between the States. 
The Centennial can give new meaning and pride in being a Mountaineer. Above all, 
what you do to .herald this birthday, can be shared by our children,' who will .enter 
Wept Virginia *s Secpnd, Century with a sense of historical destiny which only you 
can give them. Youth - West Virginia's greatest as^et - will be inspired to look to 
their native state for a golden future . » 

/ ^MASTERS OF DECEIT ': (j. Edgar Hoover - Continued) 

1. Keep informed on current events which affect our nation. . Acquaint yourself with 
the activities of the enemies of democracy so that you can readily recognize their 
efforts to undermine our cherished freedoms. Those anxious to weaken our security 
J are not always easy to identify. Communists have been trjained in deceit and Secretly 
;V work toward achieving our goal of replacing pur way of life with a Communist dictator- 
I ship. They create cleverly camouflaged 'groups, often claiming, to be working for jpeace 
/ or civil rights, and strive to dupe loyal citizens into helping their cause. They 
/ frequently attempt to gain control of legitimate organizations through infiltration. 
/ While individual Communists are difficult to recognize, their primary aim - the 
J advancement of atheistic Communism - - remains constantly clear. - - - - 
\ (To be. continued) 

BRING. YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY 'SERVICE CLUB! 




CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON', WEST VIRGINIA 
LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI l*-l6ll 

P.O. Box 1986, Charles ton, West Virginia 



October 5, 1962 



PROGRAM FOR THIS WEEK : MR. TOM MARCHIO will bring us a Program concerning the 

"REI3GI0US CULT OF SNAKE HANDLING " 

This should be interesting! ! ! 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN ; "Christians are like tea; their real strength comes when they 
get into hot water . " "A tombstone is the only thing that will say good things 
about a man when he is down." "The road that leads to misery is caused by a tongue 
that wags; because of lying lips, my friends, and a mouth that boasts and brags." 
"TODAY IS HERE, I will start with a smile, and resolve to be agreeable. I will 
NOT criticize, 



I will refuse to waste time. 



- Union Mission News 



THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK : People seem to have lost something. They don't seem to 
care anymore. It sounds corny, but maybe what we've lost is AMERICANISM .- - - 
Mrs*. O'Donough, in Saturday Evening Post 



BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to; 



Dr. Lacy Burns 



- October 2 
Robert M. Toney 



J. A. Spence 
- October 1 



- October 1 



SEATING ARRANGEMENTS : Resignations: William N. McDaniel, Table No. 9, Unable to 
.attend Meetings .... 

NOTES OF APPRECIATION : "The kindness and sympathy shown by the members of Civitan' 
during the recent loss of my brother was greatly appreciated.- - - - Denver D. , 
Casto" 



r r- 



LAST WEEK'S PROGRAM : Our Program "Woman's Best Dressed Accessory is a Well -Dressed 
Man," presented by Civitan Lloyd Woody, provided us plenty of opportunity to im- 
prove our thinking in our every day appearances. 

NOTICE : If you have changed your address or telephone number, since our last Roster, 
please let us know. Thanks. 

CIVITANS IN THE NEWS : Horace A. Pierce, Charter Member, has been placed as Office 
Manager of the Kanawha County Democratic Campaign Headquarters until November 6, 
1962. They couldn't get a better man. Horace's guest, last Friday was John 
McNamara, a newcomer to Charleston and he is with the Blue Cross Hospital Service. 
Civitans are the most "Fit" Service Club in town. Our Club holds more "Y" Member- 
ships than any other Club . ♦ . .Glendale Beck, Happy Shriner made it to Atlantic City 

and back intact Jake McClure of McClure's TV & Appliances is from Marlinton in 

Pocahontas County and so we checked with him before going to Green Bank last Sunday. 



< 



'..IT- J 



&£~ /o</A/?~JL?& 



"X" 




Several years ago we vj/'Sied Jake's home and found that J**i 

barn milking - she was v^t 85 , at the time and did lier hj housework and cooking . / . 

She is now 97 years old and in fairly good health. The drive from Richwood to 

Marlinton on West Virginia Route 39 through Monongahela National Forest was r sally ^ 

beautiful. Trees painted fiery red, fright yellow and all other colors of the 

rainbow — just like driving through fairyland. We surely have beautiful scenery 

in our State. i 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES : It is estimated that ten million visitors may be 
attracted^to West Virginia during 1963 if we plan attractions sufficiently inter- 
esting, if we stress our scenic and recreational wonders and if we promote all of 
these inducements widely. If we do the job these ten million potential visitors 
would spend more than 300 million in West Virginia -- nearly a million dollars a 
day to be shared by every City and County. 

CIVITAN DORM : Dedication - Friday, October 19; 1962 
Open House - Sunday, October 28, 1962 
Big announcement to follow later. 

CHATTER CHEESE : "I don't want to see any callers this afternoon," said an execu- 
tive to his Secretary, "If tKey say their business is important, jusl; tell them 
that's what they all say." 

During the afternoon a woman called and insisted on seeing him. 
"I'm his wife," she explained, and the Secretary replied : "That's what they all 
say." 

A really good salesman is one who can make his wife sympathize with the girl who 
lost her compact in his car. "SMILES" 

MASTERS OF DECEIT : (j. Edgar Hoover - continued) 

(2). Be sure to report all facts in your possession relating to espionage, sabo- 
tage, or subversive activities to the F*B*I. Many 'times a small bit of information 
may be just the data we are seeking/ Never delay in contacting us .when you have 
information of possible interest. 

(3)- The F.B.I* is interested in receiving facts. We want to know what a person 
does to further the cause of Communism or other enemies of freedom. Avoid report - 
ing idle rumors and malicious gossip .- - -' - To be Continued 

■SAFETY NOTE : Keep body and soul together -* use seat belts. John C. Frazier, 

Safety Director, A.P* Co. 

BRING YOUR' FRIENDS* TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB! 




-#- 



L 




CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI 4-l6ll 

P.O. Box 1986, Charleston, West Virginia 



October 12, I962 



{ 



PROGRAM FOR THIS WEEK: 



"THE FOOD WE EAT 1 ' 



Will be the subject of the Guest Speaker: MR. C* HAROLD AMICK, Director, Dairy 
and Food Division, Department of Agriculture. 

We are. sure that this subject is of interest to everyone, so don ! t miss this 
Program. 



CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN: 



"Begin the day with friendliness, 

Keep friendly all day long. 
Keep in your soul a friendly thought, 

In your heart a friendly song. 
Have in your mind a word of cheer 

For all who come your way, 
And they will greet you, too, in turn 

And wish you a happy day." - - 



Union Mission News 



THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK : Columbus facing the uncharted seas was not less charted 
than we are, facing eternal and endless space. - - - - Pearl Buck 



BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 



Belford Roberts 



- October 8 
Pat Vallandingham 



H. L. Tillson 
- October 11 



- October 12 



SEATING ARRANGEMENTS : Resignations: L. F. Sutherland, Jr., Table No. 
able to attend Meetings.... Truman Walrod, Table No. 1, transferred to 
Brookside Drive, Rapid City, South Dakota 



14, un- 
3811 



tV_. 



LAST WEEK'S PROGRAM : The Program by Mr. Tbm Marchio on the subject of "Religious 
Cult of Snake Handling," was very impressive and informative and was thoroughly 
enjoyed by everyone. 

SPECIAL NOTICE : "CIVITAN DORM" - Our 'contractor 1 , Clyde Murdock, announces 

that 'between showers', the grass has been sown and sidewalks finished 

there are still many details but, Lord willing, .everything will be ready 

for the dedication by October 19th. 

John S. Lacaria, Chairman of arrangements, announces that a real program is 
arranged for the dedication and urges that all Civitans be present for this 
gala occasion, October 19- 

CIVITANS IN THE NEWS : Kenneth R. Smith, United Fuel Gas Company was seen in 
Common Pleas Court last week - Seems like many people want something for nothing - 
and so they sue a utility - for no valid reason - we know Visited Denzil * &> /' 



Q Q 

Freeland at the Preeland Furniture Store and found that he has plenty of pretty 
furniture. .*. .Chaplain Lacy Burns preached, without snakes, at a new M» E. Church 
in Teays Valley, Sunday. ....Mr. Civitan, Charlie Roberts, Dep. Commissioner, with 
Civitan Denzil Gainer, State Auditor, had his picture in The Charleston Gazette, 
Saturday Morning. Your editor took a trip through Calhoun County, Sunday and 

now we know why Charlie Roberts left there President Cliff Flannery and Clyde 

Murdock had their picture in the Union Mission News. Clyde recently held a week 
of revival meetings at the Kirk Baptist Church, Memphis Tennessee. (iWs against 
the law to handle snakes in Tennessee, why not get such a law passed in West 
Virginia). . . .Denver D. Casto came by our house the other day - 'he used to go to 
school to your editor, when he taught here in 1925-26 but Denver overcame this 
early handicap and is doing well with -the basto Furniture Company at l601 West 
Washington Street. .. .Denver C Casto, with the Charleston Transit Company is a 
fine squirrel shot and he can also drive in a fog -* we know. . . •Cecil Washburn 

moved to Pittsburgh with FHA Bill Hess is attending meeting at Greenbrier 

Hotel Charleston Auto Show - Civic Center, November 12, 16, 17 & l8. Several 

Civitans will be there showing their new cars....W. A.* Byus, Jr. is in Chicago 

attending National Workshop for Conference Lay Workers -for M. E. Church 

Your editor is on vacation this week and will visit the State of Ohio.... He will 
let us know about it, when he returns .... 

SAFETY NOTE : To say that an accident resulted from carelessness is the lazy man's 
way of avoiding the true facts. - - - - John C. Frazier, Safety Director, A. P. Co. 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES : Civitan W. W. Barron made an appeal on T.y. for 
financial support of our Centennial Celebration. The following is copied from 
your daily paper and we think they express it very well. "The success of West 
Virginia's Centennial Celebration in 1963 rests with the people of West Virginia. 
Like almost everything, a Centennial celebration takes money. The money must 
be raised among those citizens of the state who want to see West Virginia's 100th 
birthday observed in a fitting manner. For this reason, the newspapers of the 
state are cooperating in an appeal to their readers for funds. You are asked to 
send what you can. Make your checks payable to the West Virginia Centennial Fund 
Inc., and send them to 1608 Kanawha Boulevard, East, Charleston, West Virginia. 
I want to see the West Virginia Centennial Celebration a success and therefore 

I am sending a check for $: " 

How about it? Let's make it 100$ in our Club. 



MASTERS OF DECEIT: 



(j. Edgar Hoover - Cont) 



Do not circulate rumors about subversive activities or draw conclusions from < 
information coming to your attention. The data you possess may be incomplete or 
only partially accurate, and, by drawing conclusions or circulating rumors* you 
can cause grave injustices to innocent persons. Hysteria, witch hunts, and vigi- 
lante activities weaken our security. It is just as important to protect the 
innocent as it is to identify our enemies. 

CHATTER CHEESE : A London woman gave this testimonial to a drug, company : "Since 
taking your tablets, I've b t een another woman entirely and is my husband delighted."' 
A family man is one who has several small mouths to feed, and one big mouth to 
listen to. - - - - Filmacks 



BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB! 




w 




CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 19 2-5 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI U-l6ll 

P.O. Box 1986, Charleston, West Virginia 



October 26, 1962 



PROGRAM-FOR-THIS -WEEK-: 



"THE, CHARLESTON LIGHT OPERA-GUILD"- 



Will Sing Several Selections from their coming Production, 

"Guys & Dolls" 
Mr \ Tom Murphy, Director of the Light Opera Guild will be the. narrator 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN: A luxury you ought not deny yourself is to climb to the top of 
some hill before the fairy-land of colors fade, and stand there for a moment , SILENT. 
With the trees ablaze with autumn and the infinite tender sky stretching its azure 
canopy so close to the mountain top' that you seem almost to seize it - this and much, 
much more puts all the doubters to shame . If King David could have seen one of our 
mountains in autumn he would have said, "The trees clap their hands... ...The heavens 

declare the glory of God, and the firmament showeth his handiwork," and every be? 
holder would have added AMEN. 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK: It doesn't matter how much^ money you have, everyone has to 
buy wisdom on the installment plan. Information Magazine 

BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 



John T. Kay - October l6 
Lloyd D. Woody - October 19 
Franklin W. Kern - October 26 



Richard- N. Dunkle - October 27 
Philip Dupont - October 28 
Leslie D. Price - October 23 



Frank J. Malone - October 22* 

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS: Larry O'Brien, WCAW Radio - 3^3-7503, Table No. 13, Sponsor: 
Charles F. Fox. . . . 



SPECIAL NOTICES: 



ATTENTION ALL CIVITANS 



Circle the following dates on your .Calendars and ask for the night out . 

November 6 and 7 and November 13 and lU. 

These, four evenings will provide a wonderful, night's entertainment. Watch and listen 
for further announcements pertaining to these dates. A Friend 



■WEST VIRGINIA DISTRICT COUNCIL MEETING 

October 26 and 27 - Friday and Saturday 

.Stonewall Jackson Hotel, Clarksburg, West Virginia 
President Cliff Flannery is anxious that, we have a large number present and if you 
can go, please advise Secretary Charlie Fox at once, so that he may make reservation. 



'Mi 



(*a~/*yoL??<~zjff& 



p^ 




DEDICATION - " CIVITAN DORM " : 

What a memorable occasion and one long to be remembered. For those who 

missed it we can only say that words cannot describe it, you just had tojbe there ___ 

-to^be -under-the-speli.- The-busses^left"the ^Daniel Boone "Hotel on time with a police 
escort and sped up Kanawha Boulevard. Most, of us had never been on the Boulevard in 
a bus and it seemed like another City. Squire H. H. Chinn stood at the front of the 
bus - we don't know whether fie took \tp fares or not. The busses had large signs on 
the front saying, "Transportation to Civitan> Dormitory Dedication." When we got to 
the new "Civitan Dorm" we found that a platform- and seats had- been arranged on the 
front porch out in the warm sunshine, lunch boxes were ready with plenty of good 
fried chicken, etc., which were supplied by Gene Anderson of Shoney ! s. Of course we 
had liquid by the drink - Pepsi-Cola - furnished by Pat Vallandingham . 

President Cliff Flannery did a fine job as Master of Ceremonies . Clyde 
Murdock was as proud as a peacock and we don't blame him. He overcame many obstacles 
and worked like a trojan to make his dream come true. The singing of the children of 
the Mission was one of the top attractions on the program. Juvenile Judge Herbert A. 
Richardson, Rev; John J. Wilkes of the Charleston Ministerial Association and Chief 
of Police Dallas Bias made fine talks. Governor Wally Barron made an inspirational 
address of a spiritual nature which was very good. Then the old Pro, our own 
Chaplain, Lacy Burns topped everything with appropriate words of Dedication. Then 
everyone inspected the new, beautiful dormitory before boarding the bus . On the bus 
we looked for Horace Pierce but couldn't find him - they wanted him to lead in "Hail, 
Hail, the gangs all here!" Truly, a wonderful and inspiring experience. 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES: DURING THE SUMMER the centennial will conduct a 
National Youth Science Camp in the area of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory 
at Green Bank, Pocahontas County, a world center in the new science of defecting, 
measuring and identifying radio waves from outer space. One hundred of the brightest 
boys in America - two from each state - will be guests of the centennial at a summer 
camp for . two or three weeks at the Pocahontas County ,^-H Camp at Thornwood, which is 
located about 10 miles north of the Green Bank Observatory. The high school boys will 
spend half of their time in recreational activities and the other half in academic 
programs in the natural sciences in cooperation with the observatory staff and ,science 
teachers of the state. 

(The above was copied from our Sunday Gazette -Mail, but we think it bears repeating. 
What a fine thing for West Virginia. It will cost a lot - have you sent in your 
contribution yet?) 

CHATTER CHEESE: Civinette to Hardware Clerk, "I want a one-half inch pipe plug." N 
Clerk: "Do you want a male plug, a female plug, or both?" 
Civinette: "I don't plan to raise them, I jUst want to stop a leak." 

MASTERS OF DECEIT: (j. Edgar Hoover, Continued) 

5 • "Refrain from making private investigations . Report the information you have to 
the FBI and leave the checking of the data to trained investigators. Indiscriminate 
inquiries might well jeopardize investigations already under way. In cases involving 
espionage, it is often more important to identify members of a spy ring, their con- 
tacts, sources of information, and methods of communications than to make immediate 
arrests . " 

BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB! 




X, 



CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA , 
LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI 4-l6ll 

P. 0. Box 1986, Charleston, W. Va. 



November 2, 1962 



PROGRAM 'FOR THISrWEEKr We-will- have-as^ our Guest Speakers - MR-s-PAUL HINKLE-, - - - 
President of the Charleston National Bank- >His subject will "be: "THE' COMMON MARKET, " 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN: Occasionally someone complains that the world is getting worse 
and people are meaner and greedier. Some years ago on vacation in Canaan Valley, 
we met a searching party of some kO men. They were looking for a 75 year old amnesia 
victim who had wandered off in the woods . An elderly man without money or memory 
and yet kO men willingly give up two days work each to search for this man until 
they find him. Can you imagine this in Russia? When the United Fund beckons, or when 
the children' come around "trick-or-treat for UNICEF," .thank God somebody cares. Thank' 
God not only that the benighted will be helped, but help, for Jesus- said, " It is more 
blessed to give than to receive . " - - - -Dr . Lacy Burns 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK: It- is our sacred obligation to protect our right, to Vote, and 
the only way that we ,can do that is by Voting. - - - - W. G. Vdllmer 

BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 



E. E. 
D. E. 



Steihmetz 
York 



October 30 
October 31 



James S. Mottesheard - November h 
Kenneth R. Smith- - November k 



WELCOME NEW MEMBER : Darrell G. Holley, 3^3-9601, The Custom Squire, Inc. 
Table No _._ 1, -Sponsor:: - Phil Dupont . . . . -_ --—__-_ ------ 







SEATING ARRANGEMENTS : Resignations : Dick Reid, Table No,.. 12 . . . 
Richard N. Dunkle, Table No. k. . . ftjrr Other Conner, Table No^jEL* 

SPECIAL NOTICE 
At this Friday's Meeting, you'll hear ,why I asked you to circle those urates on your 
Calendar .... Also, if for some reason you don't have a Watch, be' sure and try to 
obtain one by Friday .... A Friend 

WEST VIRGINIA DISTRICT COUNCIL MEETING : President Cliff Flannery reports that they 
enjoyed a very fine meeting at Clarksburg last weekend. International President 
Fritz Kuler of Dallas, Texas was there and we understand that he was told all about 
our Civitan Dorm. We imagine that the boys also told him about the great State of 
West Virginia, which would be just as big as Texas if the mountains were flattened 
out — according to E. Franklin Pauley. 




■ "L'~ ^>i! 



*4"g- /o/c2.;>7 



^-?V3 



S O 




% \ 



LAST WEEK'S PROGRAM: Was a very enlightening and interesting c^he, presented" by "The 
Charleston Light Opera Guild" who sang, several selections from their coming production, 
"Guys and Dolls." Mr. Tom. Murphy was the narrator .and Director. Yo u. Gu ys _whp_missj3<L^- — 
this program, really missed. __^ — — —^ — ~ ~~~ 

CIVITAN DORM OPEN HOUSE: Paul Divers reports that over 1000 people attended "Open 
House" at our" new Ciyitan Dorm. 'He also stated that they ran out of Pepsi Cola twice - 
where was Pat Vallandingham? Your Editor was \ihable to attend and we congratulate those 
who did attends and. worked so hard to make-it a success. * . - 

CIVITANS IN THE MEWS : A. H.- Pruetty Jr. has the key to the situation - ask him... Jack 
Vallandingham took part in a "Big Fly" at Culloden, W. Va. Wing walking and many unusual 
activities. Thanks, Jack for the invitation to see it... James Hopper is going on a 
diet beginning January 1, 1972... Harry Howell is going to teadh Jim arm exercise, so he 
can push away from the table... Bill Hanks thinks all this is a must for Jim's sake... 
Reported by Paul Jefferson. . .Forbes Clarke has a new Buick. He had a tough time talk- 
ing Alice out of Fire Chief Red Sports model "Wildcat. 1 . '.Lowell Bond, just returned more 
enlightened from a Clarksburg meeting of Hospital Cost Accounting. . .Hyman Cohn was 
elected Vice President of the B'Nai Jacob Congregation. His picture was in Sunday's 
paper . . .We congratulate Clyde Murdock on his choice of Fridays to invite us to see the 
Civitan ( Dormitory. . .Bill Fox sold a Policy last week. . .George Williams attended a 
Y.M.C.A^ Meeting in Columbus, October l8th...Dan C. Schneider has received his copy of 
J. Edgar Hoover's "Masters of Deceit." The Daniel Boone Chapter S.A.R. ordered 26 of 
these books and is presenting one to each High School in Kanawha- County for their 
Library. . .Tom Meadows, with the State Workmen's Compensation Department is eligible to 
join the S.A.R. and is securing Application Blanks. < .Rothwell Dewey used to be on the 
Y.M.C.A. Volley Ball Team in the 20's and 3Q's. . .Charleston Transit is a good bus line... 
Jim Hall takes good pictures cheap... Mr. Civitan, Charlie Roberts, Sr., attended the 
Washington Civitan Club and brought back documentary evidence signed by D. G. Roberts, 
Program Chairman and Member- of the Board of Directors. Ihat's a fine example, Charlie, 
we should attend Civitan wherever we are. 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTES: A maijor attraction of the Centennial Year will be a 
Centennial Train, which will be a traveling exposition of eight cars, bringing 'the West 
Virginia story to every major community in the State; The train will start -at 
Washington, D'.C. around June 1st and end its tour about September 1st. The railroads 
of the State will cooperate. They are: Baltimore & Ohio, Chesapeake & Ohio, New York 
Central, Norfolk & Western and Western Maryland. Such participation would have sound 
community relations and promotional values for the hard-pressed railroads and would 
constitute an effective exhibit of the latest in contemporary rail equipment as well. 
We will be looking forward to seeing this* train. 

MASTERS OF DECEIT: (j. Edgar Hoover, Continued) 

6. Be albrt. American workmen who are producing the materials arid weapons for our 
defense can be our best guardians against sabotage and espionage. Among the prime 
targets of foreign directed espionage are our major defense' industries, and, alert 
workmen at these installations can greatly assist in the protection of our defense 
secrets by promptly reporting any indication of sabotage or espionage. 

CHATTER CHEESE: The other day I went to a psychiatrist and he asked $25-00 for a visit. 
I told him for $25-00, I don't visit - I stay. 

Doctors have a new theory about sex. They believe that it is bad for one, but for two - 
great.- - -Jackie Mason 

BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB! 



J 



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CHARLESTON CIViTAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 

Editor, Joe E. Bedinger, DI 4-l6ll 

P* 0* Box I986, Charleston, West Virginia 



LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



November 9, 1962 



PROGRAM FOR THIS. WEEK : Our Guest Speaker will be, LT»CMDR. CHARLES E« FAAS '. Officer- 
in-Charge of the United States Naval Reserve . He will speak to us about our current 
Navy and Naval problems. 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN : Oh, not for wealth, nor fame, nor power, 
Nor Love, nbr truest friend, Would I forego the sacred hour 
Which o'er God's Word I spend. 

I steal it from the hours of sleep, If leisure be not given, 
For only thus the soul can keep, In touch with God and Heaven. 

_ - . - Union Mission News 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK : Modern progress has made the world a Neighborhood; God has 
given us the task of making it a brotherhood. - - - - Sir Philip Gibbs 



BIRTHDAYS : Congratulations, Best Wishes and Many Happy Returns to: 
C. R. Hooten - November 9 Franklin E. Pauley 



November 7 



SICK BAY : We are glad to know that Ned Merhie, Charter Member and Club President in 
1926, is out of the hospital and we all wish for him a speedy recovery. 

SEATING ARRANGEMENTS : Resignations: Walton Shepherd, Table No. 13 ....._ t 

\ 
NOTICE : The following Members have been selected to serve as Table Monitors for the 

Quarter beginning Friday, Noxember. .16, .1962 : 



Table No. 
1 
2 

3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 



Jimmie Bailey 
W. A. Byus, Jr. 
Hyman Cohn 
Eugene A. Costa 
H. C. Faulkner 
Smith T. Groves 
H. Ray Hambrick 
Charles E. Hunt 



Phone No. 

343-9433 
342-8109 
343-0156 
343-9441 
342-81*21 
342-4185 
342-5181 
342-2106 



Table No 

9 
10 
11 
12 

13 
l4 

15 



Phone No . 
Charles A. Xemkuhl, Jr. 3^2-8815 



Rex Lockhart 
Jake McClure 
T. P. Meadows 



C. 
R. 
D. 



E. 
R. 
E. 



Roberts, 
Thornton 
York 



Jr. 



3^2-3911 
3^2-8353 
343-lALl 
Ext. 2571 
3^3-9911 
3^6-9^2 
3^6-0951 



Please meet ■with me directly after Luncheon, Friday, November 9th for a brief review 
of the duties of our Monitors, which will hot take more than 10 Minutes. Thank you. 

Lowell Bond, Club Monitor 



SPECIAL NOTICE i 



ATTENTION - ALL CIVITANS 



REWIND YOUR WATCHES ! 



- A Friend 



Cj„ /*VA??-2.?1t3l 



f 



/ /-f^ 7/ 



CIVITANS IMf THE, NEWS : "If-fcrbes Clark, maintain 'that I'l^ell -more Fruit Cake this. - ] 
year than any other CivitS^lember . This is a challenge t^Lll* Charleston Civitan 
Members." There it is - who will be the first to accept this challenge? We should 
have several* challengers ... . Mr. Civitan, pharlie Roberts, Sr. made an address at 
Mount Zion - ! if you will look on your map, you .will find it in Calhoun County 



Denver D. Casto family is moving to 80^ Br^zemont„Driyje.,„just-betweeh^Den2il^FFeeland^ 
Kenneth^.^^i^huand^jrake-McClurev ""(aHrose between two thorns).... Dr. Harry r Sonny 
Liston*' Kessell returned recently from the fight. He is ready to run his "YMCA AD" 
again. . ; . The reason that Frank Litton is always late is because he doesn't have a. 
watch...., For all Civi^tans who don't have much hair, Pennys is selling multi-colored 
hair pieces which can be washed, combed, dried, .parted, culled, etc. They are only 
$1k00.... Does Charlie Fox remind you of* an undertaker? . i . -. The Y.M.C.A* is consid- 
ering closing* o.ut memberships because they have too many members . It is reported that, 

George Williams '' job is. hanging, by a thread Did you hear the latest crisis 3oke? 

"They shaved Castro the other night and found out that he was BATISTA. " KECK-OFF- 

WEST VIRGINIA DISTRICT CENTENNIAL PROJECT TO BE ANNOUNCED, FRIDAY. 

CHATTER CHEESE : Why worry about growing old? When we stop growing older, we're dead. 
Worse- .than old and bent is to be young and broke ., ■ - SMILES 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL . NOTES : It is presently recommemded that the West Virginia 
Centennial Special consist of a locomotive and eight or nine exhibit cars> the first 
of which will be devoted to History and Heritage, and will include the Staters in- 
corporation documents and other historic memorabilia, coordinated by the West Virginia 
Historical Society and other appropriate sources. The second car will be devoted to 
Industry and Natural Resources 'and will include exhibits dealing with coal, natural 
gas, ( petroleum, lumber, limestone, building stone, cement, gravel, glass, chemicals, 
salt, clay and oth.er principal West Virginia industries coordinated by the Centennial's 
Industrial ^Participation Committee. 

MASTERS OF DECEIT : (j. Edgar Hoover, Continued) 

7- The "FBT is -as "near 'as your telephone. The first page of the telephone directories 
shows the number of the nearest FBI Field Office. Each Office is open 2^ hours' a day, 
including Saturdays, Sundays & Holidays. You may furnish us information either by 
telephone, letter or in person. Data in FBI files is held confidential; hence, we 
cannot inform you regarding the results of any inquiry we may make based on information 
you supply. Neither can we confirm- or refute your suspicions relative to subversive 
activities, nor can we supply characterizations or evaluations of individuals, organ- 
izations or publications. • * 
(This is the last of the Internal Security Statement made by J? Edgar Hoover on * 
April 17, 1961.) 



BRING YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB! 



V 



G*^ 







CHARLESTON CIVITAN CLUB 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



CHARTERED NOVEMBER 24, 1925 



LUNCHEON, FRIDAY NOON, DANIEL BOONE HOTEL 



Editor, Joe>E. Bedinger, 3W-I6II 

P. 0. Box 1986, Charleston, West Virginia 



& m 



June l*f., I963 



-PROGRM~FORrTHIS~WEEK :? ^MRrr us^-about-ibe-Operations* of ^the 

Secret^ Service Division of .the United' States* Treasury* Department. 

CHAPLAIN'S COLUMN :. Every tomorrow has two, handles;, we can take + hold by the handle/ of 
anxiety or by the handle -of faith .-*--*- Henry Ward Beecher 

THOUGHT'-FOR' THE- WEEK : It ,is ^rhen we, all play * safe- that, we create.. a world of utmost 
insecurity. - - - - *Dag Hammarskjold 

BIRTHDAYS : : Congratulations , Best Wishes, and' Many 'Happy* Returns to: 
-Glendale J. Beck, - June~l4 Hubert H% Roberts - June* 12 « , 

Anthony Cupolo - June - 13 . R . \M> . Sayr e - - * June * 12 
LeRoy L. Osborn - June«il 

- SPECIAL NOTICES : ; "THE 35TH;STAR," The Kanawha County Centennial Production, June, 20-28, 
- NEEDS MEN . .If You Are- Different Than' Most: People^ And* Would Agree To Be 1 In It, . Call 

George ; Williams at 3*^3437. No Talent Needed, /Only; Warm Bodies -Abjte To Follow/Simple 

Instructions 

■ INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS AND LADIES 1 , NIGHT BANQUET - JULY 12, 1963 — ~ 

NO: FRIDAY: 'NOON JLUNCHEON.MEETINGS- -DANIEL. B00NE"H0TEL -. { -— JULYlgthL and /12th, _ ^_ 



CIVITAN. INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION - JUNE 2V26 > - INDIANA^dCTSTTlNDIANA - Claypool Hotel s - — A 



-M 

HAST"WEEK«' S "PROGRAM! " Erofe's*Sbi" Evelyn^Harris "of "Morris Harvey 'ColTege^gaveYus- a~vlvid v 
picture of the -cruelty and* stark terror that - exists in countries controlled by Communism. 
She suggested that we read some- good\books on the < subject and in this she concurs -with 

* J,.* Edgar 'Hoover > who said thatvignorance , and apathy -aided the ^ spread of Communism. * She 
said, that too many write ,>and 5 speak on- Communism when they don't know anything .about it. 

. WEST: VIRGINIA CENTENNIAL NOTfeS : Centennial events are* happening all of the^ time now and 
it's a little hard to. keep up^yith what's -going on. The papers do a good job tff listing 
the . event s -and, "you had J better^atch ^cdrefuliy or you may miss something that you wanted 
to see. » We - were in* Dunbar lasfc* week/and they -were having -a big parade - June 3-8th was 
West; Virginia . Anniversary. Week in%punbar. June- 10th-15th will- be* Centennial* Week in 
St., Albans and June*l6th ,is "Centennial; Sunday all over the* State. .What : amazes us is the 
.fact, that, people ali.over the Stater are; giving thousands .. and thousands 
of man hours to, the; Centennial. We talked to a man who had given several 
entire*,days f rom ,a. busy schedule oh a ^Centennial Project. This working 
together is a wonderful, thing . - - it shows -that !p West Virginians pulling 
together can ; get -great things .done., , * ' . 




L 



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"^ 






CIVITANS IN- ABE MEWS: Rothwe:(jS. Dewey o£ the -Kanawha ValleyQnk is paying 'Open House r ' > 
this Friday, Jun^ l*tth,,5 P*m. - 9*30 p.m. and we" are all ihviSScl. • The renovation which 
the Bank undertook was a tremendous project *ahd Rothwell had a lot ;to do with the* planning - 

•Congratulations^ Rothwell, . .♦♦ .Homer -W-. Htona/-Jrs.j|^as^a Member of The Public Service _ 

Commission several years ago 1 and he has a collection of fjmny^leiters^ that he received whil*T 
on the Commission ♦ He^saidjthat^many >persons^f eiT that The Public Service Commission meant 
Service -toHfctoej'PttBlTc in any field that they,, needed, help in. He also got all kinds of 

crackfpot phone calls* Franklin W.-Kern said that he heard Paul Jefferson on the radio 

answering , questions about Social Security, He said that Paul was Very; careful about what 
he said , and it sounded like an Attorney talk irig. .'• ... .Albert Good had lunch at the 
Governor's Mansion last Friday- with Pearl Buck and others.-, * .. .Frank Rockhold, former 
Civitan with The ^UFG, built a pretty brick house' in our block on : , Somerset Drive. Nice 

neighborhood. *For those Civitans f whb -have hot taken their children to the new Zoo on 

new route 6k, you have a pleasant surprise in store. Native West Virginia .animals ,are<in* 
the spotlights Black bears , polecats,, mountain lions, hawks ,\ etc* . v* ♦ ..Secretary- Treasurer 
Charlie Fo^c and BilL Fox have returned from a visit tb-'SunnV&l^^ -the 

Kansas City Life Insurance Company ! s* President Club Convention" last < we ek ... .V^yEj^^.S.' 6. 
Fisher was the Official Veterinarian at the recent -Centennial Jlo^se -Show...,../ 

• DONATIONS : From 7-1-62 to date: ~ / 

'Boy- Scouts ■ * . 

Children ' s Museum ' ^ 

Girl, Scouts (Mountain Laurel Council - P girl)t * -»v * 

Glenwood. School - Mandolin for Blind* Child T \ 

Good Citizenship 1 Awards (3 High: Schools) 

Kanawha Boys (Jaunty,, *Inc ., t ^ , , . * 

Kanawha Council of Fellowship for Christian : Athletes " 

Kanawha, /Council tot .Retafded:.,Children _'* ' '; ( ' l -' 

Kanawha- Welfare -Cp^ , ^ - . <i • * 

Marmet Hospital Christmas Party- '• * *j % - * * l *> * ! 

Midwestern Little" League * V 

. Salvation. Army ($200 .< Christmas - r $150. 15 Boys to Camp) "- 

Union* Mission - bormi^ory . f . 

Y*M. C. A*, (Sponsorship of -2_feoys) ; 

Y.W.C.A. (Sponsorship of 1 GirL to .camp) , 

•6/7/63 - Tbtal 

CHATTER CHEESE : The little old ikdy -was*, saying her final good-byes* to the minister, who 
was leaving the parish." "I'm so J sorry yoU ! re : goin^/ r she said. "I never knew what sin was * 
until you came here* 11 

- - *r — -The Presbyzette, First Churchy -Gadsden*,^ Alabama - 

SPEAK UP FOR FREEDOM TODAY: , ,CRC recommends that ^eactv Civitan .Club' have prepared for 
distribution to the membership a handy reference* list of State Legislators, U.* S. Congressmen 
and Senators representing them. I&lude also the- address ;of the Governor of the- State and 
the President of the United States ♦ . Show proper form to use in writing \o ea6h . * 

.Every responsible citizen should communicate his thinking on legislation and all .matters of 
public concern to those elected' to govern.. .Express, personal opinions and reasons "for them. 
Be brief , to the point, courteous. Advise, "take honest* issue if required,, express appre- . 
ciation when merited. . Communicate! 

Kie individual's personal thoughts, opinions, questions, ARE important and often a few 
letters from informed, responsible citizens, expressing individual opinions outweigh a ton 
of "production line" mail.' ■ / ♦ , ' - - " ' 

"TO M.6GOT33BJED NEXT WEEK;" 



BRINQ YOUR FRIENDS TO CIVITAN, THE .FRIENDLY FAMILY SERVICE CLUB. 1 



"- V - ,75.00 


300.00 


36.00 


... • v, % ijo.oo 


<• • .28.67 


- * * 25.00 


? 125.00 


'/ .*'*■. 250.00 


- ' . ' • . 10.00 


**•.„- . 152.1+9 


, ,>• 150,00 


350.00 


,5,120*00 


50.00 


37.00 


, $6,7^9.16 












/ 



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July 17, 1963 



Mr. 



W^ 



jM^SouJM&ejcdgen Street 
Chicago 20, Illinois ~"~~ 



Dear Mr. 



I have received your letter of July 12th and I want 
to thank you for your complimentary remarks concerning my book, 
"Masters of Deceit." 



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In response to your request, I am enclosing some 
literature on the topic of communism which I hope will be of assist- 
ance. You may also wish to read my recent ibook, "A Study of ^ 
Communism*" which is a comprehensive study of the development^, 
and expansion of communism throughout the world. A copy ma^ ^ 
be available at your, local library. 



Sincerely yours, 



MAILED Q 



COMNI-FBI 






Tolson , 



Belmont _ 

Mohr- 

Casper -_ 
Callahan _ 
Conrad i_ 
DeLoach -_ 
Evans _ 
Gale 



Enclosures (5) 

The Subtle Evil 

Let's Fight Communism Sanely! 

Communism:. The Bitter Enemy of Religion 

The Communist Menace: Red Goals and Christian Ideals 

Expose Of Soviet Espionage eQ 3*1 

NOTE: Correspondent Is not identifiable in Bufiles. 



DTP:jlw (3) 

3 OT3S 



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Trotter , 

Tele. Room . 
Holmes _- 
Gandy , 



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MAIL. ROOM CZ1 TELETYPE UNIT EH 



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8633 South Aberdeen Street 
Chicago 20, Illinois 
JvQy 12, 1963 



Mr. Tolsol 



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(M^yCasper. 

Mf Calla] 
Mr. Con: 
Mr. DeL( 
Mr. EvaW 




Mr. Gale. 

Mr. Rosen , „...-„« 

Mr, Sullivan. 

Mr. Tavel... ^ 

Mr. Trotter™. 

Tele. Room.. 

Miss Holmes 

Miss Gandy 



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Mr. J# Edgar Hoover 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 



Dear Mr. Hoover 



o 



fe have just completed reading your book "Masters of Deceit" and I must tell ' 
[you that I learned more about the Communists through your book than I ever 
thought possible. Being a seminary student I have known that the Commti£i v sts 
have done much to turn the people away from the Churches but some of the,; things 
you wrote about were new to me. If many more books of this type were written, 
people would know more about the Communists and how they work among the 'unsus- 
pecting. r , 

I would be very grateful for some of the pamphlets you wrote about so as* to givfe 
me an irisight into the way they lure people.' Being a seminary student ~T would 
be very grateful for any that were written for the purpose of condemingwthe 
Churchy especily against the Catholic Church. 

You may send any material to : 



8633 South Aberdeen Street 
Chicago 20, Illinois 



Very truly yours, 



«fc# 



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E7 JUL $^963 

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July 17, 1963 



Mr. 

Apartment 5_ 
JtjpHOntario Drive 
Sunnyvale, 

Dear ,Mr.I 




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I have received your letter of July 10, 1963, and g 

I want to thank you for your interest in my book, "Masters of Deceit' 1 * 
and my article entitled ''Communism-rThe Incredible Swindle." In 
addition, your offer of assistance to this Bureau is indeed appreciated., 

# 

Enclosed is literature, some of "which contains suggestions 
ail of us can use in fighting this evil conspiracy; Perhaps you wilt also 
wish to refer to my recent book, "A Study of Communism/' which is 
a comprehensive study of the development and expansion of communism 
throughput the world. It may be available at your local library; 



Ok 

en 



i 



ToIsoa » 



Belcaont _ 

MorV .,.,?,,, 
Casper~«lZ 
Callahan ^ 
Conrad ,«_ 
DeLoach. ^ 
Evans , 
Gale .*-. 
Rosen I- 
SuUlvqn . 
Tavei ^ 
Trotter l 



MAILED g 
COMM-FBF 



Sincerely yours, 

. P. FdgatE Hooves* 



a^ 




Enclosures (5) 

Let's Fight Communism Sanely'. 

April 1,4961 LEB Introduction 

April 17,1962 Internal Security Statement 

The Current Communist Threat 

An American's Challenge 

NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in 

DTP:ms (3) tA 



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Holmes 'JLi 
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6 

10 July 1963 




Mr. J* Edgar Hoover 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Department of Justice 

Washington 25, D.C. 



Mrrujasper„ 
Mr. ^Callahan.. 
Mr^ ConracL 
Mr^ 




Dear Sir: 



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Mr. Gale^ 

Mr. Rosen., 

Mr. Sullivan 

Mr. TavoL 

Mr. Trotter^„_^ 

Tele. Room 

Miss Hohnes__ 
Miss. Gaiid yl. "_. 



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I wish to compliment you on your recent article in the July 1963 
JHEtf AGE entitled* H Communism- The Incredible Swindle". 

On page 22 you said "" ; The concealed Oomiimnist- dedicated, to the 
proposition that the triumph of Communism is inevitable-, rejoices 
if his actions advance the forces, of * communism in the slightest 
degree" and this reminds. me, of ; the local radio program last night 
entitled Opinion, Please when the topic was ^Should the United 
States Resume Srade with Red China ?" and for a solid half-hour 
every person who called in was in favor of it on various grounds 
such as US has her head in the sand like an ostrich; or, I lived 
oyer there from 1935 to 1960 and they. are nice people who need our 
help* This made me wonder when I read fharpassage from the article q£ 
mentioned above whether these people were not lost to the cause of -^ 
Americanism if ever they should be called upon to declare themselves " 
for or against* communism. This smacfes to me of the example you gave -j 
of - the way the communists avoid the direct approach and 'throw out ^ 

bait, instead. These people, were ei titer deluded or trying to delude. 

^ -■_-.-.__ - • . _^- 

I wonder, too, if the recent Supreme Court ban on religion in the 
schools has any .connection, with the prophetic words ; of William Z. 
Foster;-? .Sod will be banished from the lafcorat&ries as well as the 
schools! 1 quoted on page 321 of your-book kyasters of Deceit 1 ^ ? ~ 

Rjust wanted you. to know that here's one American who is on guard 
and thanks^you^for^your words of wisdom. If I can ever be of any 
help, please call on me. ~ ~~^ — ~„ _-*-*--«- _ r 

C^ < - ^ ' . 

!*)-■" • Yours in AP & AM 







1663 Ontario Dr #5 hj 
Sunnyvale, Calif om^T 



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Belmont - 

Mont'-— - 
Caspet _ 
Callahan. , 
Contact _ 
DeLoacfr . 
-Evans — 
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Rosen' ,**> 
Sullivan - 
f«vel 



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Isolates ,_*_ 

JGaody _-— 









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1963 




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Dear Mr. 



I have received your letter of Jultf 18th and want 
to thank you for your very favorable appraisal of my book,, ' 
"Masters of Deceit. '•' Your generous comments are indeed 
appreciated. 

Your concern about communism is understandable, 
and your desire to learn more regarding the nature of this menace 
is reassuring. I have always believed that a broad knowledge of 
the objectives and operations of the communist movement is 
essential if Americans are to effectively resist its influence. 

In response to your request, it is a pleasure to 
enclose some material which. I hope will be of interest. You may 
also wish to refer to my latest book, "A Study of Communism, " 



which is a comprehensive study of the development and expansion 



TJ 




; 

CD *" 



of communism throughout the world. This publication may be-n 
available at your local library. ' 

Sincerely yours, 



Enclosures (5) 

See enclosures and note on next page 

JCF:mek U 
(3) Jr^ 



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MA1C.R00MUJ TEUETyPEUNIT 



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Enclosures (5) . ^ 

jEomm^uriism arid The Knowledge To Combat It! 
Letts Pj^Kt Communism, Sanely! : 

Do YotffEteally Understand Communism? 
,f An. American's Challefage^ 1 10-^62 
Cqmmuriism~The Incredible Swindle . 

NOT!E: ©ufiles contain >no information identifiable with-corj\espondent; 



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MrV^olso: 

Mj^Wtper, 
m/palJaJaB. 
Mr* *Gon$d 
Mr. P<\ 
Mr. EvSKs J 
Mr. (V* 
Mr. H^n-™ 
Hr. SulKvan 
Mr, Tayel 
Mr. Trotter, 
T$le. lloom 
M'&s Holmes, 
Miss Gandy, 



# 



Mr. J* Edgar Hoover 
Director - FBI 
Washington, D.C'i 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 



12012 . Jeanette; Place 
Granada Hills, California 
July 18, 1963 



o 



913^4 



I have recently read your UbolcT* Masters of Deceit , 
which I consider not only enlighteningT^^^ 
service to the national interest., I, consider you the 
ultimate authority on the subjects of subversion and 
lav enforcement in general, and have recommended the /! 
book to all , of my associates. 

I am interested in acquiring further knowledge of 
communist subversion in our country and would appreciate 
any information regarding materials oh this subject (gov* 
ernment publications, published, records, etc.). Thank you. 



Sincerely. 



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UNITED STATES/ 



QvERNMEN^ 

Memorandum 



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: DIRECTOR, FB? <64-35684) 

*«* * - • ' 

from .; g^ jjj^j ,(4Q -iai82> (C) 



.date: 7/1.7/63 



subject: 



] 



"DlARtO LAS AMERICAS" - 

DESIRE TO REPRINT PORTIONS OF * 

SPANISH EDITION: bF-*MASTERS OF DECEIT" 



Be lliani letter to Bureau; dated 6/27/63, captioned 
as above.- . ' ' " 

- Enclosed if or the Bureau is a copy of a ; iettpr i 
dated 6/26/63. w ritten by King Features Syndicate to llr. 

I of th e "Americ as Daily 1 ', , and a letter, 
dated 6/27/63, by Ur. l ~~1 to the King Features Syndicate 

in furtherance of their negotiations relative to "Masters 
of Deceit.-" 



$*- Bureau (Ends. - 2) (Eli), 
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£aolg aooress^LASAM£R.ICA 

^r Dxakio Las Amjekigas 

20H IA I0BEHTA3), IA CTJXTTJHA T IA SOUX»AHIDAD HEKISFEBICA. 



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TELEPHONE TUXCOO 6-7S2I 



ADORCSS MAIL TO: 
R, O. OOX 366 
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 
MIAMI 48, FLORIDA 



Teds Americas Dajxx 

K>3BL laBEHXY, CUX.TUH3E AN3> OaDE^dDCSPHDSKIC SOUDDASXXT 

4349NORTHWEST 36XU $TREGT 

TyrTAMT SPHXNTGS, IXOKrDA. • 



OFICINA DEL DIRECTOR Y GERENTE 
OFFICE OF THE EDITOR AND MANAGER 



June 27, 1963 



WASHINGTON OFFICC 

IOOI CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

SUITE OIO * 

WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 

TEL. REPUBLIC 7-7413 



Mr. 

King Features Syndicate* 
235 East 45th Street 
New York 17, N.*Y. 



vDearMr. 



^ 



^Receipt is acknowledged of your .letter of June 26th. 

Regarding our desire to obtain publication rights to "Masters of De- 
ceit", may I request from you the following clarifications: 

1) We were under the impression, according to your letter of July 
25, 1961, "that the condensed Spanish version of the outstanding series ; 
is available for the flat rate price of $125. 00 plus postage. The com- 
plete 28 installments in English is priced at $100. 00 plus postage. " 

2) Regarding this, we want to know if still there is the possibility 
of obtaining from you the condensed version in Spanish and.how many ^ 

articles the series includes, with the corresponding illustrations. 

%. * , 

3) If, were it not easy for you to obtain the condensed Spanish ver- 
sion, or that condensation were too short, we could translate ourselves 
entirely the 28 installments on which you have the copyright. 

Really, we are inclined to avoid the translation work in our offices, 
but were it necessary to do it, we would then do it ourselves. Perhaps it 
would be possible to use^the translated paragraphs of the complete text 
of the book published in Spanish as they coincide with those of the series 
of 28 installments. That is, we would use the translated text of the bock 
already published in Spanish. Should there be a&y obstacle to this, please 
let us know. 



jo 6 
b7C 



Looking, forward to your prompt reply, 



ENCLOSURE 



Egitpr^and Manager 



f Z3& £>nr .IS*" STREET 

N^ YORK 17. N Y 



J/" 




ahca roc?r £«*-mc rf seoo 









v c. 



June 26, 1963 



.[ 



Mr 

Editor .and Manager 

TSE AMERICAS MIL* 

I4.3I1.9 Northwest 36th Street 

Miami Springs, Florida 



Dear Mr. 

Thanks for your letter of June 20 ordering J. Edgar 
Hoover's book, "Masters of Deceit;" 

We do not have newspaper syndication rights to "Masters 
of Deceit" in its entirety, By special «™geBTOt 
with the publisher we were able to release the book in 
28 instalments totalling about 1*5,000 words, We can 
send the copy in English together with the ^rations 
and I understand that it is your plan to xsake the trans- 
lation. In Baking the translation ve f^ ^Y°*lSr 
abide by our agreed with the publisher and J., Edgar 
Hoover.in having the translation follow as literally as 
possible the original text of Mr. Roorer s book. 

Won't you plaase let ae hear from you if you ere prepared 
to go ahead with "the syndicate edited copy and I can 
arrange to rush saterial to you, iassBdiately. 



Jo 6 

hlC 



With best vishes. 



-o 



CER:gm 



ENCLOSURE ' 



•\ ^ V 



o 



o 



July 30, 1963 



/ 



it? ' *z^_ 



MisJ 

RockWd, Uhio 4b8B2 




be 

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Dear Miss 



Tolson 



Belmont , 
MohV. 



Casper ^_ 
Callahan , 
Conrad _ 
OeLoach . 
Evans _ 

Gale 

Rosen — 
Sullivan - 

Tavel ! 

Trotter 
Tele. Roi 
Holmes 
Gandy . 



I have received your letter of July 23rd and I want 
to thank you for your interest in my book, "Masters of Deceit." 

In response to your request, I am enclosing litera- 
ture on the topic of communism which includes suggestions all of 
us can use in combating this evil conspiracy. Perhaps you. will g 
also wish to read my latest book, "A Study of Communism," which o 
is a comprehensive study of the development and expansion of coier i 
munism throughout the world. A copy may be available at your _ 
local library. 

Sincerely yours, 

A- Edgar Hoover 



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MAIUEQ25. 

JUL 31 1963 

COMM-FBr 




Enclosures (5) 

Let T s Fight Communism Sanely! 

4-1-61 LEB Introduction 

4-17-62 Internal Security Statement 

How Young People Can Help Defeat Communism 

The Current Cbmmunist Threat. 



NOTE: Correspondent is riot identifiable^oh Bufiles.r 
DTP:jlw (3) Am' 






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MAIL ROOM CZ1 TELETYPE UNIT CZ3 



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TRUE COPY 



July 23. '63; 
Rockford, Ohio 



Dear Mr.. Hoover; 

I am appointed to speak about Communism for 
our F.H. A school club* 

o 

I have read your book Masters of Deceit, . and 
I was wondering if you could help me gather information on 
the subject of Communism. 

I was really surprised to fmd out how much 
Communism can do to a country. I think every one should 
read your book. 

Pmrsixteen & I could really understaid your 
material & I hope we never fell to Communism 




Address per envelope: 



REDTfe 



Rockford, Ohio - 45882. 



9 AUG 2J1963' 




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FROM 



4-572 (Rev. 7-18-63) 
ornoNAi rotM no. 10 

MAY lt*2 COITION 
CSA CCN. 110, NO* 17 




UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 



The Director 



N., P. Callahan 



DATE: JL/u £.3^ /%3 



SUBJECT: The Congressional Record 



■! * 



Pages 12326-12327. Senator Simpson, (R) Wyoming, spoke 
concerning the nuclear test ban discussion. Mr. Simpson stated "We must not j , 
let the hope for an agreement, desirable as it might be, place the United States*/!/ 
in the jaws of an international trap that is baited with the 'Sino-Soviet dispute. / 

The Soviet Union knows that the West will not initiate an attack— preemptive 

war has never been a tenet of our defense dictum— and we should know by now the 
t utter worthlessness of agreements with the powers described so accurately by 
i our own FBI chief as the ^Masters of Deceit. ? An endless list of promises and t 
f agreements abrogated by communism since World War n should lay to rest any 
vapid reference to the honor and statesmanship of communism. " 



i 






C 



NOT BWcordedT 
176 AUG 1 1963 



In the original of a memorandum captioned and dated as above, the Congressional 
Record for Monjcuu vMjf <&3y /Y<£3 was reviewed and pertinent items were 
marked for the Direc/t&r's $tention. This form has been prepared in order that 
portions of a copy of the original memorandum may be clipped, mounted, and placed 

l|jrM a I as i25^ b Mf^ ter files * 



in appro] 

\ or 



FD-36(Rev. 12-13-56) 



^m-v**** 



o 



6 



o 

FBI O 

Date: 8-1-63 



Transmit the following in _ 
AIRTEL 



Via 



(Type in plain text or code) 

AIR MAIL - REGISTERED 



(Priority or Method of Mailing) 



n 



M 



TO 

PROM 

SUBJECT 



[ 



DIRECTOR, FBI 

KJELE5 



SAC, LOS ANGELES (62-5435) 



] 



RADIO NEWSCA STER - STATION KGER. 

L ONG BEACH, CALIFOR NIA"" 1 ' : — 

INFORMATION CONCERNING 



Re Los Angeles alrtel 12-7-62 concerning 
claim that Long Beach libraries were failing 



to feature Director's bookjr ^'Masters of Deceit". 

On 7-30-63 captioned individual contacted 
the Long Beach Resident Agency in p erson a nd was 
interviewed by SA EMERY D. TURNER. I I advised that 
he was contacti ng the L ong Beach Resident Agency 
inasmuch as he, I I had recently made an 
however, did not describe what the expose concerned. 



"expose", 



b6 

b7C 



thaiL 
in[_ 



Lhaiked about literature in Long Beach libraries 
considered to be obscene, however, did not 

specifi c value . The interviewing 

] complaint other * 



^EhaE 

furnisn information of 



agent, who made no comments to . 

t han to exp lain Bureau 1 s Juri sdictio n, noted a bulge 
J clothing and asked [ 



Lifhe had a 



<L 



advised that he 



recording device on his person, 
had such a device on his person however that it was not 
turned on. Intervie wing agent made n o comments that 
could be utilized by | j intentions were not 

clear nor explained, ho wever, it is the opinion of the 
interviewing agent that I I may be attempting to quote 
someone in making his exposes. 



J^\^J- Bureau (AIR MAIL - REGISTERED) t ^ . . 

1 - lo. AnS e,es . .^ jfc/yfcg; 

RJStmak * 

(4) 



r^- 



#?■/* 



Approved: 



V9I 



IE AUG 3 1963 



lu^ff- 



Special Agent in Charge 



|ar57AU6rW 




r 



6 



LA 62-5^35 



Bej 



* 6-3.63 \_J 



riew of Los Angeles files show that on 

I furnished information concerning books 

in Long, Beach libraries_fchat he considered to be 
obscene in nature. I J since referenced airtel 



J 



has furnished miscellaneous inf ormatio n concerning 



has in the 



books in Long Beach libraries. 

past indicated that he is a firm supporter of the 
FBI and admirer of the Director. 



be 

b7C 



The above 
purposes inasmuc h as 
clear. Althoiigh[_ 



i 



s being furnished for information 
present motives are not 



]has indicated he is a friend 



of the Bureau, Agents are be ing adv ised to be 



circumspect in dealings with 



and the Bureau 



will, be advised of any developments in this matter. 



- 2 - 



FROM 



OPTIONAL fOUM NO. 10 
MAY IU2 I0IIION 
G$K G|N« KCG* NO. 37 



Q 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 

Memorandum 



fl TO j Mr. DeLoach 



subject: "MASTERS OF DECEIT" 







PATE: 7-31-63 




Robert Emond, Deputy Director, Office of Security, Jlnitq^States 
Information Agency (a for mer FBI AgentV on 7 -30-63 advised that an employ ee/off 

Hns agency by the name of | | had served as a United States guide 

at an exhibit on technical books in the Soviet Union from January to July, 1963, 



Upon 



b6 

•b7C 



| return to th e United States this month, he reported 

to his USIA superiors that upon enteri ng RussiaT the Soviets had searched his 
luggage. The only item in his possessioTTwEicITwas not returned to him aid was 
confiscated by the Russians was a copy of Mr. Hoover T s book, "Masters of Deceit. " 



RECOMMENDATION: 



C3 






rfifar infonhation. 



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Ml AUG 6 1953 




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July 29* .1963 




f&A 



Tolson 1 

BelmonK* 
MoJir'~„: 
Casper — . 
Callahan '. 

Conrad 

DeLoach „ 
Evans _ 

Gale _ 

Rosen ^4? 
Sullivan _ 

Tavel,___ 

Trotter . 



Miss 

Trade Permissions 

General Book Division 

Holt, Ririehart and Winston, Bic, 

333 Madison Avenue 

New York 17, New York 



Dear Miss[ 



] 



Thank you for your letter of July 23rd 

Yorktown, Virginia, 



enclosing requests from. Mr. 
to use excerpts from " Masters of Deceit" and "A Study of Com- 
munism. " We are making appropriate checks and will advise 
you as. soon as possible as to whether this will be acceptable. 

Sincerely yours, 







*S***> 



~f 



NOTE: 
checkout 



XI 2 91963 



Clyde Tolson 



■f~ a: 

— * io 



lis not identifiable in Bufiles. We are having SAC Norfolk 

— *^ CO Q 



before granting permission. 



^rVA:par y 
J5). ^m*/ 



Tele. Rooaf ,| r\ <* ,* 
Holmes, yj * *j> ,% ^ # - 
Gandy JI — ___ MAIL ROOM I 




be 

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TELETYPE UJUT 




If. 




o 



o 



Mr. Caspe 

Mr. Callahan — y 

*^ Sw^DeLoachiEL 
^ j^r. Evans 



■^ p ;--■- ■ ,r ""'V V A ;"" WW —T-" ■» T . H . M ^ r . v^M. - " - "^ ?fl i.. 1 i. . ■ « ■ ■ ^ r . Gale.... 

Holt, Rinehart and Winston, inc. • publishers^. Rosen. 

»" ■» ■ i ii ii iirnn i -rn"fTWiriMwni iiii —- M i ni iii m i - i ir im - niirwi i iniinir ■ ■ mn i r nr ■ i in-wT i -T- i - i nn nw i i w Mr. SulliVJ 



383 MADISON AVENUE. ..NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 
Genera/ Book Division 



*Mr. Sullivan- 
Mr. TavcL. 



V 



[GEN ER A Ll^ddkS]ter„ 
__„».. Jtele. Room- 
[TEXTBbbK fils Holmes... 

.-,«—,' DSiss Gandy.. 
[MAGAZ NESt 



July 23, 1963 



Mr, Clyde Tolson 

Federaal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 



Washington 25, D,C- 



i 



Dear Mr, Tolso^^Jb^* 




*~< 



* , _— — 

^ We enclQgg^two t hermofax letters we have received from Mr, 
~ \ [o f %orkt own, Virginia^ requesting permission 

tOtoluoWTSom~raUI^^ OF DECEIT, 

ui 

^Before we determine exactly what material he wishes to quote 

r~from these books, we await word from you as to whether this 

^jLs acceptable to Mr, Hoover. 



A&u£t€& 



t/u-H 



he 

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caJ 



Sincerely, 





s^. 



LZ:ls 



Trade Permissions 





l*a~}oV277 -2$W 



e AUG 7-1963 



EX-102 \ 



U- 











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J 








Henry r-'^lt and Corapany inc 
333 Madis?- Aveaae 
New York IT 
New York 

Gentleaep : 

Fw.-ently, I wite uns?»l<:,+ed articles abet *.-* . *• -lit 
threat ♦: : ^ oostry, to ox? 1* al -*?er a It U sc w«lr* + »< r. ** 
authoritative sources when t.»e'> are available. 



C'-asi^aHy, I a* unaUe *..« ^e pood nate-ial ».«.«•« f - 
neglect *.:- rei-e-t persleslc^ ♦ "-:"„« a certain r-», ■**♦■ ■-*-«- 

fore, 1f -• * a*-« are inmlYe* r ^e-aos^fiUy re~ *<" 
to -v-e ^-p*b, in citer., > ~ >t. T - ^"^ "' *~ 
"fester*. Of e--eit M „ Crodt* A * 'Iven to t»y f- - - 



*V» ^r *■%* 



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Augucte, 1303 



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Mis aj 

Trade Permissions 

Gcnoral Book division 

Holt* Rinehart and Winston, Inc. 

383 Madison Avenue 

New York 17, New York 



Bear Miss 



As ia foilbw-'Up to nay letter of July 29, 
1903, concerning the rejects of Mr* 



X 



CJ" 

Yorktown f Virglniai to quote excerpts from "Masters of 

■*V I— — W— l_ || Hi, 

Deceit" an d "A Study of Communism/' w© have no objection 
to his using this material jta the manner ho has indicated* 
It should foe mado clear to Mr. 



be 

b7C 



however, that this 




must not bo construed as approval or endorsement by 
Mr. Hoover of his nrticle.s. 

Sincerely yours, 

Clyae Tolson 



^2s^O 



Y 




^ & ' v f « ^ t> w 




- -NOTE: Misis 



DeLoach \ 
Evaqs __ 



bv let ter of 7-23-63, to Mr.. Tolson, enclosed 



j copies (pftle'tterllroml requesting permis sion to quote from "A Study of 
/ Communism" and M MaT3ters~of Deceit." F ' ~ "" 



is not identifiable in Bufiles and 



tuHwon^^^^t 1 SAC, Norfolk wa s instructe d to check him out* Mr. Tolson replied by letter of 

To vol -_.m,,_, .^.._ -. - ~~ ~~ - - 

Trotter ^ _ , 
'TgUtBpofty.,— 3?y 
ttoltoog', 



7-29-63, to Miss 



Gondy ^.. ■^t-, xi _ ! ^ 



to djeteri^ai^i^ y ^^»ia~acqu^g5e toJT 
mail ro6m^P / t|^:type < u»«tE3 JSLR: eajy> (5J 



informing that appro priate checks were >^ing made 



request. 
"(Eote continued, page two) 




'**, 






o 

Miss Louise Zoerner 



o 

NOTE (Continued) 



[ 



SAC, Norfolk, by airtel 8-3-63, advised 



born 



] is employed at the Naval Weapons Station, Yorktowh, Virginia^ 



be 



He has a good, reputation and check of files of appropriate law enforcement >7c 
agencies disclosed no unfavorable information. SAC recommended 
be given permission to use material as requested. 



-2 - 



!>oV 



FD-36 ($U*y. 12-13-56) 

"•5?^ ***** 







FBI 



Transmit the following in 
Vi„ AIRTEL 



1 



Date: 8/3/63 



(Type in plain text or code) 

REGULAR 



(Priority or Method of Mailing) 



TO: 

PROM: 

SUBJECT: 



DIRECTOR, FBI 

SAC, NORFOLK 62-710 (C) 
- W 



URAL ROUTEl ^: 



rS GROVE' LA NE 

^RESEARCH (CRIME RECORDS) 
BUDED 8/5/63 

Re Bureau airtel to Norfolk, 7/29/63, 

The -following investigation was conducted by, 
SA VERNON Ef NIVANS, 8/1/63: 

Norfolk files conta in no unfavorable Information 
concerning ! I He is employed at the 

Naval Weapons Station, Yorktown, Virgin ia- Review of 



his personnel fil e revealed he was ^born 

J ~|_Kansa s . He retired from tne u. s. 

Navy wiT;n raTJS or Chiefs after serving from January 1, 

1937, to March 1, 1954. On Septem ber 26. 1941. at 

Shanghai.! China * he was married to f I 

I r oom in I i on November 14, 

1911. He currently holds the position of GS-11, Ordnance 
Technician. "Oh January 26, 1959* he was given a Secret 
clearance*. His personnel file cqntained no unfavorable 
►•information and reflects two commendations for enthusiasm 
and. performance of his duties^ 




Agent 



Naval Weanoas Station, and Deputy Sheriffs [ 



2 



'Office of Naval Intelligence. 



. York County, Virginia* adv ised 

they possess no unfavorable information concerni ng I I 
or v his wife. Both Deputies advised the | | have 

O- Bureau ,^-\ ^''.T^ CZ=l'd221= 

^3 . e AUG^^ 



be 
b7C 



1 - Norfolk 
x VEN:jw . 




fis-l 



<& 



o> 



Approved: 



£-»&L. 



1° 



^ 



Special Agent in Charge 



Sent 



.M Per 



OBiffiC 



M 



g«. 






6 







NF 62-710 



excellent? standards of character, loyalty and reputation* 



No arrest records for the 
York County Court, Yorktown, Virgi: 



niaT 



located at the 



Mrs.T 



] (Established Source), 



iaiown tne [ 



\ Virginia, advised she, has 



] for afcout eight years, and she recommended 



both with regard to character, loyalty arid reputation* 

It is recommended that Mr* | J be given, 
permission to use material from "Masters of Deceit" and 
11 A Study of Communism*" 



be 

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b7D 



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1 



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:< J tee- 5* 62~/0ycZ77' 




August 8, 1963 



P" 



Tolson fP _ 

MoKr -_J 

Casper _ 
Callanah , 
Conrad — 
DeLoach^ 
Evans. , 



Mr, 

^Agartment 7 

1753 ^Ww|sil 4Terrace 
MiamU5r Florida 



53 

m 

O 

o 

mi 

Ho 
-o 



Dear Mr. 



Your letter of July 29, 1963^ has been received, and 
lam glad to Know you Have read abortion of my book, 0,, Masters of 
.Deceit. " I also want to thank you for your Un& best wis hes 1 - - " 

Sincerely yours, 

r J. Edgar Hoover, 



John Edgar Hoover 
Director 1 



Jl - Miami - Enclosure. 




I \, C0MM*B! 




^ 



23* 






IV?,!>CE 



b6 

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^ffi^l^VH 




**$$H C f S§? P^p 4 -to not identifiable in B^au^ies. ^ j 3^ W * 

0"* '"" 



: SAW:jlr(4) 






Gale — 

Bo sen 

Sullivan 

Tavel 

Trotter . ^ , 

% Wo. poiaMLi-^' 

1 Holmes , 1 v ^ r — 1 ,i 1 

Gandy ..,, ^,, ^ MAIL, BOOM LLJ TELETYPE UNIT LlJ 







^ 



f •*" 






<3 



d 



SUMMARY FROM SPANISH 






Handwritten letter postmarked at Miami, Florida, on 
July 31, 1963, addressed to the Director of the FBI, Washington, 
D. C.,, 



from 



Mr.[ 



] 



1753 S.tf. 14 Terr., Ap. 7 
Miami 45, Florida 

The writer in his communication dated July 29, 1963, 
congratulates Mr. Hoover on his splendid article which he read 
on July 28, 1963, in the newspaper "Las Americas," an extract 
of the Director's book "Masters of Deceit." 



called "J. 



says that the publication could very well be 



asters of Deceit and of Cynicism." 



The writer is a Cuban by birth and very grateful to 
the American people and their Government for the liberty he 
enjoys in this country, particularly in Miami, which reminds him 
so much of his beloved fatherland. 



Mr. 



1A^ 



condemns the morbid and cruel system of 

communism. In order to get away from Cuba he had to give his 
house, his furniture, and his money away. This he did with 
no reservation because now he is the master of his conscience, 
of his heart and of his soul. His wife and himself denounce > ~* 
the terror regime in Cuba and wishr*o the Director further success 
in his work in the interest of humanity. 



b6 
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e AUG 13 1963 




ST1MMAKT7FTO BY: ZeP. 



K 



August 2, 1963 

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August 9^ 1963 
AIRMAIL 



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Jbraia cto Fiaitfeii go. l/Z'an 905~ 
"Rio de JanelroTBrazil 



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Tolson Tm - 
!B«ImbnV _ 

Ca$pet — ■ 
CaHahan _ 

Cpprad 

IDeKloach _. 
Eyans .«_ 

Gale — 

Rosen , 



Dear Major 



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MS .% 

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I receivedvour letter of July 29th, and I am 
glad you found my bookr ^Masters of Deceit," of interest. 

I regret that I do not have any publications 
concerning the development, of communism, in Brazil which 
I am able to furnish, you; however, in response to fcour 
request, I am enclosing some material; concerning communism 
and the means to combat it which I- trust will beof help, to you. 

Sincerely yours, 

'J. Edgar Hoovefi 



Enclosures (5) See next page. 

1 - Rio de Janeiro - Enclosures (2) 
X - Foreign Liaison Unit - Enclosure 

NOTE: Bufiles reveal no identifiable; information concerning correspondent. 
^Translation Unit recommends the above salutation;? " ji „ 

iDFC:ped (j?) \ M^^^a^/ fl^JJ^ 



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rSulUvan. 1 

■ T*ottet ' "" 










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Major 



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Enclosures (5) 

Communist Illusion and Democratic Reality 
Communism— Slavery of Mind and Spirit 
Communism and The Knowledge To Combat It! 
The Communist Party Line 
0£e Nations Response to .Communism (Spanish) 



Ml 

Vffr 



-2- 




ft 







SUMMARY FROM PORTUGUESE 

'Typewritten envelope postmarked at Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, on July 29, 1963, addressed to the Director 
of the FBI, Washington, D. C. , 



from: Major 




Mr. Callahan 

Ufa Coj) rad ^^^ 

Mr. 6alo.« v 



Mr. Roscn..^. 
Mi*. Sullivan. 
Mr. Tavel™. 
Mr. Trotter— 
Tele. Room.™ 
Mis3 Holmes. 
Miss Gandy_ 



Praia do Flamengo^l^ ap 903 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

containing a handwritten communication dated July 29, 1963, 
in which the writer praises the Director's work ■" Masters of 
Deceit." He desires other publications pertaining to the fight 
against communism, about its development in Brazil, its 
methods and about the best means of combating this terrible evil 
which afflicts humanity. /. * haj/fyx 

Majoi reveals that he has publicly spoken ^JA^tAj) 




in the Club Militar (Military Club) against the communist activitie, 



^ 





REG«25 





Summarized by: -jU- JUX <^' ^lIL^L^ ^ d 

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AKgu^iajS, ., , , « AUG ^,963 




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~^ JUL Lo**~~, &1 C&HSZ&* <=^ '^ €i - 

AVENIDA ItlO BRANCO, t51 /\ 3^ /T " U' 

*IO DE JANEIRO • OB. / 1 "--^ f. / f— — J2 "7" 

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August 16* 1Q63 



EX-I03 Apartm entX 



15? MorrJsJStxej&k^, 
Albany* New York: 



Dear Mr. 



Your communication postmarked August 12, 1963, 
with enclosures, has been received. 

For your information, we do not have copies of 
"Masters of Deceit" for sale. Paper-bound copies of it can be 
obtained by writing to the Mail Service Department, Pocket 
Books, Incorporated, 63Q Fifth Avenue, New York 20, New York. 
The retail price is f iffy cents, plus five cents per book for mail- 
ing costs. 



/"st 6 1963 



COMM-FBI 



I am returning the money you enclosed. 
Sincerely yours, 

J - Edgar Hoovefl 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



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Enclosures (2) 

NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in Bufiles. 
Correspondent's enclosure^lwere 2 quarters; 
CJJmgf J* \l i '* «» ** * • " 

81 



(3) 



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Enclosures; (5) , - , ----"> 

4/17/62 Internal Security Statement 

:4/l/61 LEB Introduction 

Communist illusion and Democratic Reality 

The Cqmmunist IRarty Line _ 

One Nation!s Response "to Communism, * , 

. v ' '.' "* , %.- . * -" _ 

NOTE: Correspondent cannot be identified in Bufiles. 



-2r/ 



ii 



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6 



C O N T R, A C T OR AND BUILDER 
2824 PIEDMONT AVENUE', BERKELEY 5, CALIFORNIA 
TELEPHONE 848-408 2 




November 6, 



Mr. Casper 
Mr. CallaKa 
Mr. Conrri 
Mr. BcI^Sh. 
Mr. Ev 
Mr. Gale 
Mri Rosea 
Mr. Sullivan—— 
Mr. Tavcl—— — 

Mr. Trotter 

Tele. Room — 

Miss Holmes— ^ r 
Miss Gandy.. 



Mr. J- Edgar Hoover 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington 25, D. 0. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 



/^ Having just finished reading your splendid book, 
MASTERS OF DECEIT, I feel led to write directly to you. 

First, .1 want to thank you for making this information^; 
available to us. I only wish it were more widely read. I have|g 
gust now come across it and most of my friends are in a similar< 
predicament. I have been busy trying to ]be a good wife and ££ 
mother, taking an active part in church, school, scout, and sompi 
civic activities.. It seemed to me that I did not have time or 
strength to participate in political activities other than to 
vote, of course.. However, recent events have created within me^ 
such a feeling of apprehension and frustration that I musjb^ask -* 
"what cajv'I; do,?".-. I am eager to purchase paper back copies of 
your book, and to hand^this , .jbo~v£-riends an&ac quaint etnees with- a 
most^iticere request that they read it quickly.. But what^lse? ' 
Is. there other current literature that we shduld .read? What else, 
can I do to help preserve our wonderful American .heritage of 
freedom gg j. &$-/<) 4&77 - \\ ~ 



Co' 



:***- 



err 



"Many things I find very disturbing and frustrating, 
the civil rights demonstrations' and the cruel way in which the 
colored people ar^^^b^^^mi s-used by the communists. . But how 







can we communicate this to the masses of negroes?? 

I, realize that you, do i^o^nha^ .tke 
i oris *, but .please , , ,wx li * y ou , t e 11 me 



$|#E1 



CORRESPQ^pENCE 

e time to answer all of 

my questxohs, but please,, will* you, tell me about the firing of 
%fc> Oteplca n PjI have the impression^tnat ;h"e^has a" fine 'record of A 
loyal, service - that";he was endeavoring to protect us^ro&'ta&ihg^ 
back into government service the former traitor, Alger ^issnand.,ofchers 
of questionable integrity.. That the charge against him^has'to'do 



^2£*S* 



.fc**.. 



Wp~-^ 











C O N T R AC TOR AND BUILDER 
2824 PIEDMONT AVENUE, BERKELEY 5, CALIFORNIA 
TELEPHONE 8. 48-408 2 



November 6, 1963 
page 2 



Mr. J* Edgar Hoover 



with his giving information to the Senate Internal Security 
sub-committee. . What is wrong with that? How else can our 
elected lawmakers and representatives be sure of our security? 
Do we already have a dictatorship? Is it too late? 

0?hank you very much for your help.. My husband arid I 
are sincerely concerned and .we- will sacrifice to help fight this 
evil. 



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Sincerely yours, * 



*>#* 



SL 



- **&^**~s-_ 




7 - 



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November 14, 1963 



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Mrs 

Shouns, Tennessee 



Dear Mrs. 



I received your letter of November 7th. I want 
to thank you for your kind comment concerning my book, 
•Masters of Deceit, " and I am glad you found it of benefit. 

It is a pleasure to hear from citizens who are 
aware of the danger communism poses to our freedoms and 
desire to combat this menace. In view of your interest, I am 
enclosing some material on the general topic of communism. 
Perhaps you may also wish to refer to my book, "A Study of 
Communism. M It is a comprehensive study of the development 
and expansion of communism throughout the worlds A copy may 
be available in your local library. 

Sincerely yours, 



j. Edgar Hoovefl 




If 



Tolson , 
Belmont - 
~Mohr__ 
Casper _. 
Callahan , 
Conrad _ 
DeLoach . 
Evans _ 
Gale 



Enclosures (5) 
Deadly Duel 
A, View of Reality 
AaArmy of Free Men _ 
Communism and The Knowledge. To Combat It! 
Communism: The^Bittei^Enem^^of Religion . 




s= 3? 



O 



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o c 



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Rosen . 
Sullivan . 
Tavel , 
Trotter , 
Tele. Boom 
Hojmes 
Gandy 



NOTE: Correspondent isVnbt identifiable in Bufiles 
DFC:ngfi ,(3) 



x>+- 



|=/,«r/^8lid?2l1963 

'_ ^ MAIL ROOM □ ^TELETYPE; UNIT □ 




^\— ►-" 



v 



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TRUE COPY 



Shouns, Tenn. 
Nov. 7, 1963 



Dear Mr. Hoover, 

How are ypu? I am fine. I am writing to tell you 
that I read your "Masters of Deceit " It is a wonderful book. 
I appreciate you writing it. I didn't realize that communism is 
at our doors. I will be on guard. It may interest you to know 
that the Baptists are publishing lessons on communism in their 
"Training Union Quartleys. M That is really how come me to 
become interested again in communism. I shall pass this book 
of yours, around to all who will read it. 

Yours for a better america, 



Mrs. 



he 

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A^i " s \ 





^ ^ //^ 



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EX-ioy 



CZ-IDWDT**** 1 ) 




November 18, 1963 



Miss| 

24 Lakeview Avenue - 
"Bay Shore7 New York 



Dear Miss 



received. 



Your letter of November 13, 1963, has been 



32 -"** 




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2? 3? 




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You ara probably referring to a book I wrote on 
communism entitle d^Masters of Deceit* " I do not have copies of 
this book available for distribution; nowever, you may be able to 
obtain a copy at your local library. I have also written another 
book on this topic entitled "A Study of Communism. " You may also 
be interested in securing a copy of this book. 

In view of your interest, I am enclosing publications 
on the general subject of communism. ' 



MAILED, 11/ 

NOV 181963 

COMM-FB! 



Sincerely yours, 

IL Edgar Hoover 



John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



'/(S* 




Tolson ^ 

Belmont - 

Callahan ^ 
Conrad __ _ _ 

DeLoach _ 
Evans _ 

Gale r 

Rosen „ 

SuUivai 

Tavel 

Trotter 

Tole. Room 

Holmes 

Gandy 



Enclosures- {5) 

Statement on Communism 7-15-62 
An American's Challenge 
Deadly Duel 
"' A' View of Reality 
Time of Testing 



NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in Bufilesii 
SAW:jf (3) 










6 



TRUE COPY 



24 Lake view Ave 
Bay shore L. I. NY 
Nov. 13, 1963 v, 



c ^4d2 



To whom it may concern 




May I have a copy of the booklet by J. Edgar 
Hoover Practices in Deceit 1 Heard about it on the f Les 
Crane T. V. show 

He had John Laudner (Spell) and E. J (McCullach) 
not sure of the mens last names as it is not se.enfinxprint-. 

Thank you Sincerely 



24 Lakeview Av. 
Bay shore 
Long Is land 
New York 



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EX-103 







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November 26, 1963 



Mr. 

AttornejLat-Lav 
621 : ^5JIUlerJ3uilding- 
'YaKima, Was hington 9 89Q1 



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Dear Mr. 



S3 

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-to 



<sr» 



I have received your letter of November 18th and 
I am glad to hear of your daughter's interest in my bookp M Masters 
of Deceit. " * '— 



This Bureau does not have available for distribution 
information bearing upon the specific topic of your daughter's 
planned paper; however, I am enclosing literature on the general 
subject of communism which I trust will be of assistance to her. 
Perhaps she may also wish to read my latest book, "A Study of 
Communism, " which is a comprehensive study of the development 
and expansion of communism throughout the world. A copy may 
be available at your local library. 



MAILED & 

NOV 2 6 1963 

COMM-FBI 



Sincerely yours, 

& Edgar Hoover 



&f 



Tolson « 
Belmont . 
Moht_, 
Casper , 



Enclosures (5) 

Keys to Freedom 

Let's Fight Communism Sanely! 

4/61 LEB Intro 

4/17/62 Internal. Security {Statement^ , 

What Young People Should 1 T "- Ap - Ar 



5w A*b6u 



Callahan, ___ 
Conrad -„;fh\ 
DeLoaclfLJ. 
Evans ^ 
Gale , 



aT- 



'.£■ 



Rosen - _ __ _ 
Sullivan ., 

Tele. Room 

Holmes _ 

Gandy _ _ _ 



ommunism 
NOTE: Correspondent is floM<fenftfijable in Bufiles 



DTP:plr (3) 
«fl 

MAIL ROOM CZ3 TELETYPE UNIT Q 





• 



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'•• - . 




'law offices 
LYON, KOHLS'AND BEAULAURIER 

621 -025 MIULCR BUILOINO 




CHARLES R.LYOM 
RICHARO L. KOHLS 
V. J. BCAULAURICR 




YAKIMA f WASHINGTON 

, 98901 
November 18, 1963 


TCLCPHONC 
GLCNCOURT 7-0111 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Department of Justice 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 

I would like to request that you furnish me with some 
material for my daughter who is working on a school 
project relative to communism. 

She has available to her your book entitled "Masters 
of Deceit 1 ?, but she is particularly interested in any 
material which wouldl.help* her write a paper on the 
question "What, it would be like living under Communism 
in America". 

If the Director has speeches or other material that 
would bear on this specific poin v t$ I would appreciate 
very much having you forward them to me. 

Very truly yours , 

LYON, KOHLS S BEAULAURIER 

By 



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**^£±:2r27U 



!4 NOV 27 1963 








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mi 



Tolson 

Belmont 

Mohr «,. 

Casper 

Callahan 

Conrad 

DeLoach 

Evans 

Gale 




1316J5ast3 ordan Street 
Pgnsacola, Florida 



Dear Mr. 



m 

o 

mi 

rn 

cog 

h! 

o 
o 
3C 



X have received your letter of November 18th and 
certainly appreciate your moat favorable appraisal of my book, 
"Masters of Deceit. " \ 

While I would like to be of service, we do not have 
available for distribution to the general public a copy of the 
Proclamation of the Academic Community of Charles University, 
or any other information concerning this proclamation in addition 
to that which is revealed in "Masters of Deceit " 



Enclosed is a list of organizations designated by the 
Department of Justice as subversive pursuant to Executive Order 
10450, along with some other literature I trust you will find to be 
of interest* Perhaps you may also wish to refer to my most recent 
book, "A Study of Pommunism, " which reveals the development and 
expansion of communism throughout the world. This book may be 
available at your local library. 

Sincerely yours, 

B. Edgan Hoovec 






V? 

—a 



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MAILED 5 

JOV 2 6 1963 

•COMM-FBr"** 





Enclosures ,(5) 

What Young People Shoultepw Abojit |Cojnmunism 

Organizations designated as "subversive by the Attorney General 

Deadly buefo - r. 8*1* 

Young People Can Help DefeatACgmmtmjsm 

What You Can Do To Fight Communism _ 

JCFimlk (3) SEE NOTE NEXT PAGE. 

MAIL ROOM CD TELETYPE UNIT CZ3 1^^ \ 




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Mr. 



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NOTEi Bufiles contain no information identifiable with correspondent. 
Pages 237 2nd 238 of "Masters of Deceit" give detailed information 
concerning the proclamation from Charles University in Prague, 
Czechoslovakia. It is felt it would not be in the best interest of the Bureau 
to furnish a high school student with a copy of this proclamation. 



r.2-~ 



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y 



* 

^ 



* 



1316 East Jordan 
November 18, 1963 



Dear Mr. Hoover, 

At times like this, words have a bad habit of failing me. 
I don't belive that there is really any way to express the thankfuMess that 
is in my heart concerning your book, Masters of Decei t. 

In a class, in Comparative Government class in fact, we 
have just had to turn in a report on your book, Masters of Deceit. Concerning 
several thing in that book, I like to ask questions. 

I would like for you to send me information concerning the 
"Proclamation of Charles University" and how I could get either a copy of it 
or see a copy of it. Also, I would like to know if you could send me a list 
of front organizations in the Escambia County, Florida area. If you have 
anything that you think ^ould be helpful to me concerning these two things, 
please send them to me at the following address: 



-bb 
b7C 



1316 East Jordan St. 
Pensacola, Florida 

Any information would be appreciated. I cannot miss this 
opportunity to complement you on your book, Masters of Deceit. I appreciate 
your efforts in preparing the book because it is a very inspiring to me. 
Other students at Pensacola High School have though that it was boring, but 
I believe that that was only because reading the book was required. 

I do not,think that I will ever forget your book, and I do 
ferverently pray, that America will wake up. 



>* 



*" Sincerely yours, 

,0 



\V S*.n . Acts 16:31 



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1963 






—Psalm 107:1 _^ 




*^« * , *- 



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yuijeZx 







§~JUIuuk MdUMdT U*)ii^trnh' MetauAJU 





jfrWl, 




vJi> J(W^ arte/ $ chr> 



dc&/6;3} 



"All things are possible for him, 
that believcth." 

—Mark 9:23 




Mr. (CaMchan*. 
Mr. Ce^*.^—^ 

Mr. nbjQieSkr 

Mr. KvJ 
Mr. GajJi. 
Mr. Rosen 
Mr. Sullivan 
Mr. Tavel.^. 



Mr. Trotter 

Tele. Room 

MiS3 Holmes... 
Miss Gandy. 



■b6 
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Si 






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£<*■ -/0 Y?~77— 




November 27, 1963 



Tolson , 



Belmont - 
Mohr 

Casper — 
Callahan , 
Conrad _ 
De Loach . 

Evans „ 



Gale — 
Rosen . 



SuMvact , 

Tavel 

Trotter . 



Mr,| 

ApartmentJLl_ ^s 

%a^§wpodJTerrace 
Morehea^r^TOggy 



be 

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Dear Mr* 



Your letter dated November 21st has been received* 



m 
o 

"Hi 

m 



j The courtesy prompting your writing me is very 

much appreciated, and I have no objection to your making reference co 5 
to my "Masters of Deceit" to the appendix of your term paper. I 

Enclosed are other publications on the general subject of communism"""* 2 
I hope you find of interest. • ■ cf 



o 
o 



In the event you are not already familiar with it, you 
mayjalso wish to refer to my later book entitled "A Study of Commu r 
nism. " It is a comprehensive treatment of the development and 
expansion of communism throughout the world, and perhaps a copy 
of it jis available to you through your college or local public library. 

Sincerely yours, 
8' Edgac Hoovec 



IM 



o 
so 

-an 



<HO 



NOV 2 7 1963 

...COMM-FBt 




Enclosures (5) 
Keys to Freedom 11-16-63 
Time of Testing 
Deadly Duel 



John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



.. Expose of Soviet Espionage w$ -. 
-One Nation's response To communism 24-^' c^ 
i NOTE: Correspondent is not identifiable in Bufiles 
DCLrpaw x-^^^X' 



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Lakewood Terrace 
Perratt Hall, Apt. 
Moreliead, Ky» 
Nov. 21, 1963 

J". Edgar Hoover, Director 
Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D, C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover 

I am a student at Morehead State College and at present I am 
writing a term paper on world commumism. 

In your Book "M asters of Decei t" you gave an example of a 
party caucus and an account of the communist take over of a non- 
communist organization called the "123 Group". I would like permis- 
sion to put these two sections of your hook in the appendix of my 
paper. I will give you full credit. 

Thank you very much for your kind attention. 



bo 
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& 



& 



Yours always 

TT.? ,— -£* — in nil ■ nn 




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DEC 



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iNDENCE 










6«2-/6^77- 



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December 4, 1963 



¥ 



Mr. | 

Box 22782 

Fort" Worth, Texas 76115 



Dear Mr. 



50 

m 
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I have received your letter of November 27th, and &> w 
I want to thank you for your interest in my bookP "Masters of Dece i t, 51 
and for your generous remarks concerning my administration of tire ' % 
FBI. it is hoped that our future endeavors will continue to merit youig 
support and approval. * 

' In response to your request, I am enclosing literature 

on the topic of communism which I trust will be of assistance to you. 
Perhaps you may also wish to read my latest book, "A Study of Com- 
munism, " which is a comprehensive study of the development and 
expansion of communism throughout the world. A copy may be available 
at your local library. 



vn 






MA1UERS 

DEC- 41963 

COMM-FBl .. 



Sincerely yours, 

E. Edgac Hoover 



fi' y 



Enclosures <5) 

NOTE: Correspondent inquired about work of the bureau by letter 10/9/63 
and Was furnished Bureau reprint material by outgoing 10/16/63. At that time, 
Touoa he was not identifiable in Bufiles^ 



Belmont 
Mohr,_ 
Casper 



Xet's Fight Communism Sanely^"* '» w 



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5S5h."33EBI liEBBitro 4/61 



Conrad , 
DeLoach, . 
Evans — - 
Gale _ 

Ho sen — 



Counterintelligence Activities 
-^Keys To Freedom" 11/16/63 
~Phe Communist Party Line 



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Sullivan j ji mm „J A\ fri\ 

Tavei _JimTPrped!^3) y , 




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Tele. Roo&^ 
Holmes , 
Gandy _ 



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November 27, 1963 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 

Dear Sir: 

I have read your book Masters of Deceit and 
found it very interesting and informative. I 
would appreciate any more material which might 
be available regarding communism and its threat 
in the U.S. and the world. 

Any material which would relate directly or in- 
directly to the matter of communism would be 
appreciated 1?ery much. 

Thank you for your help and continued battle 
against the wrong in our country. 



— m m 



Box 22782 
Port 

76115 



2p5 



;Texa"S? v * 




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3 DEC 5 1963 



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EX.-iiz 




December ^ 1963 



Mr. | 

1901 Richm ond Street 
Sacramento 2b, yamorma 



Dear Mr. 




I received your letter, with enclosures, on November^t^ Cy 
and I want to thank you for the confidence expressed in me. It is hogged oj? 
that our future endeavors wiil continue to merit your support and agpro^&i. 
I also want to thank you for your interest in my books, "Masters of Deceit" 
and "A Study of Communism. " 




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With respect to your inquiries, the FBI being an investigative 
agency of the Federal Government neither makes evaluations nor draws 
conclusions as to the character or integrity of any organization, publication 
or individual. In addition, information contained in our jgles must be 
maintained as confidential in accordance with regulations'of the Department 
of Justice and is available for official use only. Therefore, I trust you will 
understand Why I am not in a position to answer most of your questions. 

I would like to point out Karl Prussion assisted this Bureau 
y furnishing information on subversive activities from November, 1949 to 
uly, 1958, during which time he was compensated; however, he was not a 
f^p&sjstL -A&egt. His actions since that time have been personal ventures and 
* he FBI i%nq't in a position to comment on these in any way whatsoever. 

c>> V,<o Enclosed is a copy of the list of organizations which have been 
ited a^subyjejr.sive by the Department of Justice of the United States 
pursuant to Executive Order 10450, in addition to some other material which 



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I 



I trust will be"of interest. I am returning the material you 



Sincerely yours, 




rded. 



(JWrioiav 



©over 




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tJohn'.EdgarcHoover 
Director 



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Enc. 

4-17-62 "Internal Security Statement 
List of Subversive Organizations 
Let l s Fight Communism 'Sanely! 
4-1-61 LEB Introduction 
Counterintelligence Activities 



NOTE: Dr., Fred Schwarz is well knbwnto Bureau files. Jtfiss 
is known in Bureau files as* a, member of the American First, Committee in 
1945.- No. derogatory information appears in Bufiles concerning correspondent. 
The material returned, are the items listed; in the body; of his letter. 



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November 21,1963 



Mr. J,. Edgar Hoover 

Federal Bureau of investigation 

Y/ashington, D.C. 

Dear Sir: 




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In your sensitive position, if it would not b,e appropriate, for your Bureau 
to fill the requests listed belovr, possibly 1 it couid recommend other printed matter, 
or organizations, (either (governmental, or private,) which could. Your 2 books, 



* 



Masters of Deceit" and "S^udy of Communism" are already in our home iibrary. 

First of all, am enclosing three publications: 

(l) 1 "You can trust the Communists", by Dr. Fred Schwarz 

(2) "What's happened to our schools?" , by Rosalie II. Gordon ♦ 

(3) "Calif. Dynasty of Communism"', by Karl Prussion(was published during 
the last Governor's election in California) 

I Can your Bureau scan -the 3 enclosures an make comment?, etc, as to their 
authenticity & accuracy pf information, the** return them, C.6.D. ? Especially ono 
one by Karl Prussion, since the booklet says he iai an ex- FBI investigator.. The 
booklet also stated he seaxxBH secured permission to leave the service of the 
Bureau iri order to carry his story to the public. Any information regarding the 
CDC mentioned in his booklet would be appreciated. 

W. Cleon Skousen has written "The Naked Communist", and recentlywrote a booklet 
about the John Birch Society. Since I do not have a pocket-book-size copy, of either, 
they are not enclosed. However, the Bureau is probably familiar with them. Could 
you give the same kind of information, on these 2 publications, as Is bein£ asked 
on the 3 enclosures? A friend asked why Mr. Skctusen.left the Bureau. Yours trula 
was unable to give an answer. Any available/wouJS m &eappreciated on this also. 

In this day and age, it is hard for the average citizen to obtain the unvarnished 
truth on , many vital subjects, especially when Communism rears its ugly head. 

Now for some additional requests; 

(1) Please send an up-to-date list of "front organizations", as well as 
those who have- been, or are, infiltrated, or manipulated, by Communists. 

(2) Please send an up-to-date list of "Neo-Fascist and Hate Groups" list, 
similar to the one published by the Congressional Comraitte on Un-American 
Activities, on Dec. 17, 1954. Possibly your Bureau Ms a better list. 

(3) Some Civil Rights groups have been accused of being formed by Communists j 
run by them, or infiltrated by them, in the past, or at the present time. 
What available information do you have? 

Thank you for your courtesy iri answering a previous request, for information, some 
years ago, and for your consideration of these above named ones. Here's hoping you 

stay as thgrhead of the FJBI until another 10 ySfers^t least, 
needs men 63 your dedication. 



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- C if.,, Respectfully & Sincerely yours, 
h. B I 1901 Richmond $#.*£? 



■fears,' lit least. Our country RSfids surek, 



a*-wev-S0-i963 



.. . # . #t Sacrame&to5 Z% Calif. '& 

P.S. A carbjoji copy of "this ^letter is. bed,"ng made, so 1*11 remember what was asked& 
— , Also, whatever the oost of filling the' requests, is, will be glad to pay it^ 






MVtyt& Cfr J^st send everything 









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- ■ * W i Tjna i« M rr- i rtr . Tiwt i tfu ii ' b ■ n'tf i ^ 



/WW OFFICES OF 
YMKINS UTTIE & MIX 
717 - 20TII ST. 
SACRAMENTO 14, CALIFORNIA 



^iim niw*rta> 




1901 Richmond Street 
Sacramento, California 



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December 5, 1963 




^ ■■ -Mr. 



^Apartment 25 
_3TStates Street 
San Jbrancisco i4, California 



bo 
b7C 



Dear Mr. 



Your letter of November 27th has been received. 



In response to your inquiry, you may obtain a 
regular edition of "Masters of Deceit" by writing directly to the 
publishers, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. , 383 Madison 
Avenue, New York 17, New York. 

Sincerely yours,*' 



Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 



NOTE: Bufiles contain no identifiable, information concerning correspondent. 





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Belmont 

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37 states. St/Qi, <apt\ 25 
San, Franciscans.*/-, .California 
.November 27, 1963. 



1 



Mr. J+Eggar Hoover 

Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 

9th and Pennsylvania Avenue 

Washington 25 > D-C. 

Dear Mn Hoover; 

This is a strange request but ^1 will try, to explain., 
X am a law student at Hastings College of the Law in San 
Francisco,. On the afternoomof November 26, 1963, I - came 
across a copy of your boo kHvas t ers of Deceit* and spent 
the next four hours engrosseajin reading it. 

A natural act as a student was for me to place small 
checks inred ink on the margin next to important popLLs— 
that I mtght remember them. This ihq librarian, Mr.\_ 



disfavor and rightly so ka§; taken awdy l my privilege to use 
the library for the rest of the year* or until I can replace 
the iiook. 

I 7icu>e tried everywhere but cannot {oocyte a hard 
bound, copy. I, am sure you reiize the* dtff ic^ulty of trying 
to study law without the il^e^of 'the library. I wilt 
gladly $end the money fgr the cost of the book and its £~ 
shipping if it would not be too great an inconvenience 
for you to notify me where I might locate the needed copy. 

Very truly yours, 



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**2 DEO S 1263 



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December 9, 1963 



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Tolson _- 
Belmont - 
Mohr__ 
Casper — 
Callahan . 
Conrad — 
DeLoach , 
Evans _ 
Gale— ^ 
Rosen _ 
Sullivan _ 
Tqvel 



Mr&. 



XL 



The C UdflJtodson Training 
UnionClags 

^^iMaemont-AKejiufi^JJ^JKt 
Washington, D. C. 20010 



Dear Mrs. 



Your letter of December 3rd has been received, 
and I am glad you found my bopk/^'Masters of Deceit," of interest. 

It is a pleasure to hear from citizens who are 
aware of the menace communism poses to our American heritage 
and desire to combat this evil. I am enclosing some material 
-which I trust will be of help. You may also wish to refer to my 
book, "A Study of Communism," which is a comprehensive study 
of the development and expansion of communism throughout the 
world. This book may be available at your local library. 




Sincerely yours, 



U. Edgar Hoover 



Enclosures (5) 

Communism and The Knowledge To Combat It! 

Deadly Duel 

A $iew of Reality • 

My Answer to Communism and Crime 

Communist Illusion and Democratic Reality 



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NOTE: Bufiles contain no identifiable information fcoii£ei5ning Mrs. 
Leffler. 



DFC:mc 



_L-. MAIL ROOM (ZD 



Holmes 

Gandy 




a 





December 3, I963 



Dear Mr, Hoover; 



c 



I would like to call this matter tb^yout ~ 
attention, because I believe you will be, Jjit'erestect 




ifrr. Tolson 
Mr. Bnlmq 
Mn Tviohr 
Mr. Casper L 
Mr, CallahanjLl 
Mr. Conrad... 

MTm K 
Mr/iivat 

Mr. Gale 



Mr. Jtosen 
Mr. Sullivan 
Mr. Tavel 
;Mr. Trotter 
Tele.; Room' 
Miss Holmes 
Miss Gandy 




3 



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4 *. 



Some time ago you published a bo"bk;titled, Masters 
of Deceit. The story revblvs around Conrnmnlsm, and I;am 
proud to say we 'are using your book as a g\Mie in our: Training 
Union Class at Church, Because of your boolc^ w|« recognize 
the potential dangers that threaten our American^way of life, 
and with the help of God, we hope to overcome that^threat,- 

For we feel, the better we become acquainted with** 
Communism, the better we will be qquiped to fighjf*against. 
this evil. Thank you for reading my letter, ancSnay*our fc Lord 
bless you as you continue your fight against CoiS&uni§m.*£k 6 



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The Clide Dodson T. U, Class 
2027 Rosemont Ave. N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20010 



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December 26, 1963 



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3org - Warner Corporation. 
X7S0 K Stree£;"N. W. 
Washington 6, D. C. , 



Dear Mri 



O I received your letter of December 20th and 
the copy of "Masters of Deceits which you left at my office. 

In response to your .request^ it is a pleasure 



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to autograph the book to Mr., 
it to you under separate cover 



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land X am returning 




Sincerely yours, 

0. Edgar. Hoovet 



Tolson _ 
Belmont _ 

J Mohr L_ 

Casper -^- 
Callahan — 
Conrad _ 
DeLoach — 

kJEvans ^ 

(Jale . 

Ho sen _— 
Sullivan *^ 
Tavel' . 
Trotter _ 
Tele. Boom 

Holmes 

Gandy . 



NOTE: Mfci I | has cooperated with this Bureau in matters of interest. 

In view of the fact that his, company is well kno wn and it -would be 
necessary to determine through him l I residence to conduct a field 

investigation^ it is felt that his request should, he complied with. Buf il es 
contain no Identifiable information concerning 




DFC-.mlk (4) 



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= 53 JAN 6 1964 ^ 

_ MAIL ROOM LJ TELETYPE UNIT L-J 



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BORG-WARNER CORPORATION 


i 


200 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE • CHICAGO 4, ILLINOIS 

20 December 1963 


• WABASH 2- 


-7700 




- 


| PLEASE ADDRESS REPLY TO: 

I 1730 K Street, N.W. 
I Washington 6. D.C, 
1 FEDERAL 8*7141 




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Mr. J., Edgar Hoover, Director 
FederabBureau of Investigation 
Washington 25 , D .. C . 

Dear Mr. Hoover:^ 

As -a reward for an apprentice. trainee who is now going 
through an Apprentice Training Course in Borg-Warner 
^Corporation, we would l ike to ask. if you would kindly 
autograph a book.to Mr. 



who will 



/ 



graduate at the head of his class, pur reason. in 
asking yotuis-that a portion of this Training Program 
includes a course, in- Citizenship, of which much of 
your material was .used. 

Sincerely, 




b6 
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FAFrrt 



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a DEC SO 1963 




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Miss[ 



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Post 0f£ice.J3px 209 
Phoenix^^jOreg on 



December 1# 1969 

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Dear Miss 





g 



1-have received your letter of .December 17th, -with enclosure, and 
can understand the concern prompting your communication. I also want to 
you for your interest in my book^ 'Masters of Deceit ," 

In response to your request -, I have commented generally regarding 
the need for opposing communism rationally and intelligently. Our efforts to deal 
effectively with this subversive menace are not enhanced by those of the extreme 
right who tend to affix the communist label without intelligent analysis, or by 
those of; the extreme left who endeavor to minimize the real danger of communism. 
In speaking of the extreme right, I refer to those individuals who would violate 
our laws to obtain their objectives., I consider them as lacking in true Americanism 
-as those of the extreme left who would also violate our laws to achieve their own 
ends. 

As can be noted above, I have refrained from naming specific persons 
or organizations for to do so would only identify this Bureau as for or against any 
particular group or person. Since the FBI is the general investigative agendy of the 
Fed eral Government and neither makes evaluations nor draws conclusions^ to the 
chajracter or integrity of any organization, publication or individual^ I trust you will 
^understand why I am not in a position to comment any further along the^nes you 

£ha% suggested. £f 1 

t- .. 
cc : 
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With respect to your specific inquiry, I am enclosing a copy of my 
^address before the Washington Hebrew Congregation in order that you may read 
M- *" its entirety. I am also sending you other material which I hope will be of 



interest 




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Sincerely yours, 




WI *W,Q 



B S Si 

a. Edgar Hodtfer 

John Edgar Hoover 
Directors . 



Trotter . 
Tol^< 

Holi_ 
Gandy 



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See note and enclosures next page 







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.NOTE: Co-respondent is not identifiable in Bufiles. Her - , b6 

enclosure was a page from a newspaper, setting forth a letter to the b i c 

Editor by one Toni Galli who is not identifiable in Bufiles. Gaiji 
claims the right wing : is not to*b£ blamed for some of the current 
activities, while the editor uses the Director's address, "Faith in 
Freedom*" as >a basis for rwplyihg^at Galii is but of order. The 
quoted [portion of the /address iis reproduced accurately. 



Enclosures * 

Faith in Freedom 
Letts Fight Communism Sanely! 
4/1/61 -tEB Intro 
. 4/17/62 Mernal SecuritjrStatement 



-2- 



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" ^*~< 



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TRUE COPY 



Phoenix, Oregon 
Dec. 17, 1963 



J. Edgar Hoover 
F. B. I. 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Sir: 

I am enclosing in this letter a sheet from my local 
newspaper, the "Medford Mail Tribune. " Marked for your notice 
is the editor's note, following a letter by Toni Galli. The editor 
did not name his source in quoting you. Since I have read your 
book, "Masters of Deceit", I wonder if you really wrote or spoke 
this. It sounds so different - "out of character" to your writing 
in the book. In fact - excuse me - but it sounds as much like 
"fulminations" as does Toni Galli's letter. b6 

b7C 

May I ask you, sir, did the editor quote you 
correctly? 

Respectfully yours, 



P. O. Box 209 
Phoenix, Oregon 



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iCasfro-Ioymg^arxishand^conl 
fT>.-xi.'*rfn^~rs >f "i. , Vi u tt»: 3 uu " '"?e i&M ^dJOommunist'itassassin: 





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— "' "have^bfipfi'I^i&r'?i.l t%»da^has|hMd^?doTO|#W 

^iCommunist^probably^enjoyd 
mor^pr^tecUoniiiPAmerica-thanl 
teeyeridid?in|Russ a; ■•;■ %Sj&l 

feLet'slalsojjputnsomejtotathe] 
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iep:cluttertthe,;;iStreete%an^ 



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«uti!their|f*ealT3BjepU^if1to 



jgnorancejfprejudic^andsJigi 



iaeals^which^they/claimrfo>tm ; 

hold*.*.. - 4 -^: ^^ - 

f3f0uF^best^ffenslve£against 
cnme>,;;s^ersioni^int^rance 
and^liS^miesipp«.i%!s j 



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December 30, 1963 



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Mrs. C. C.'&iffl&i 
516 South Hal LStreei~ 

Dear Mrs. Geisinger: 



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I received your letter of December 20th, with 
^ enclosures, and want to thank you for your interest in my book, f_j g 

C/ "Masters of rteneit. " ~t 



'Masters of Deceit. 1 

With respect to your inquiry, the FBI, being an 
investigative agency pf the Federal Government, neither makes 
evaluations nor draws conclusions as to the character or 
integrity of any organization, publication or individual. Therefore, 
I trust you will understand why I am not in a position to comment 
along the4ines you have mentioned and it is . hoped that you will not 
infer either that we do or do not have data in our files pertaining 
to the individual you mentioned. 



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Enclosed is some literature which I trust will be of 



interest to you. 



MAILED. 3$ 

coMw-^Frr 



Enclosures (5) 



Sincerely yours, 

Q* Edgar Hoovec 

John Edgar Hoover 
Director 



Tolson . 



See Bureau note and enclosures next page. 
DTPrnrf (3^ ^ 1 $17* ***J3 > 




TELETYPE UNIT 





riLeJ**- 








Mrs, C. C. Geisiriger 



NOTE: Cor respondent %s not Identifiable in Bufiles. 

1 1 Kellogg, fdaho^ is known in Bufiles as an anti- 



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communist who has beeii cooperative with the Bureau during 
the course of our investigations. No derogatory information 
appear^ in Bufiles concerning him. 

Enclosures, . " - , " r 

4/17/62 internal Security "Statement 
4/1/61 LEB Intro* : . " 

Xet's^ Fight Conlmuiusm Sanely!; 
; Counter in'te^Ugehce; .Activities 
Keys to -Freedom , 



* Ji- 



* 



- 2 ~ 



kv 




TRUE COPY 



Dec. 20, 1963 
Grangeville, 
Idaho 



J Edgar Hoover 
Washington- D. C. 

Dear Mr Hoover: - 

Here at Imperial Hotel - small 75 room hotel in 
Grangeville, Idaho population 3300 I am night clerk - several 
years ago I worked the swing shift but like part time graveyard as 



I can visit with the stragglers or early risers who fioterest me.. I'm ' ). 



I relay all the gab to my husband who works at a saw 
mill nowjjut was house to house salesman for these two Counties 
Idaho^rfd Lewis for 20 years so he is a doubting Thomas always. .• 
Esnexialy - like any "much married" husband - my ideas. tfello 




He mistakenly (so I think) misread a note 
3nade for me about the few requirements of small study 




groups. Actualy my good man and myself need o ur glasses ch anged 
as my good, little boss here at Hotel pointed out | ~~| w rote 

Home packets 

Text>Bpok -^ -^ 

3T~Edgar "Hoover 

"Masters of Deceit" 

For use in home to study 



Because Mr. told me he, has been accused of 



be 

b7C 



being a Communist my husband thinks ne is,aiso, my husband, 
£Choc" misread "Masters of Deceit" and thinks it's Master of Deciet 
me aning you, M r. Hoover, so Choc is wanting me to write you to see if 
Mr | l is OK - Choc has utter faith in you. 

I want to organize a small study group of some of our 
younger friends - we oldsters aren't going to be. around. too long besides 
we are not so gullible. ^53 fag-/ 0M£.JZ?/^IX\ 

ryy~fo3 Please send me some assurance M j" frfl$ OK - if. he 

(Q-" c ^ isn't we want to know that also. *>.. 




JtffPfh Wis &&«■"««• r 

C&7P'- "**ttf ^—5— Grangeville, Idaho 83530 



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OKANOGAN (AP) — A Jtomjmf ended liis testimony as an ad 
Catholic priest who formerly verse witness^ for the defense. 




lived at near-by Tonaskei has* 
laid claim to having set in mo 
tion the plan to unseat former 
State Rep. John Goldmark lapt 
year. 

The priest, the He v. Emmet 
Buckley of Sheridan, Ore., b6~- 
^an testimony yesterday after- 
noon In the trial of the Gold- 
marks* $225,000 libel suiU The 
Goldmarks contend they were 
damaged by statements during 
a bitter liberal-conservative 
Democratic primary campaign 
last year, 



The Federal Bureau of Inves 
tig a tion, he said, welcomes re* 
ports about Communist activity 
but "does not welcome people 
who set themselves u^ as fudges 
of their-, jfellow Americans and 
call, them Communists wijhout 
any # ground." 

pefense attorney Ned Kimball, 
questioning Goldmark* about a 
speech he made May LS at EI- 1 
Iensburg criticizing the "far 
right,** asked him* to define the 
"far right." ; 



'The people who are appeal 
ing to Americans not on the 
basis of a tolerant, rational dis 



_ Father Buckley testified that J CUS sion of Issues/ people who 



I while he lived at Tonasket, I960 
/62, he organized a county anti 
/Communist study club an< 
| spawned the idea to tape-recor 



re appealing to the Americaij 
eople on the basis of . * * hate 
nd suspicion to make them dis- 
rust other Americans, on the 



i an interview with Albert T?j Ca, Vu Issue of Communism primar- 
J well of Spokane about Goldmarkljny ** was Qoldmark's definition 
* and about Mrs. Goldmark's for- 1 ^* 



nxer membership In the Commu- 
nist party* m 



suit 



Earlier yesterday. JGoldmark 



Issue Exploited 
Golmark said members 



of 



Canwell is a defendant In the the **far right** are concerned 



with other Issues, but commu- 
nism **is the main one they are 
exploiting at the moment" 
I Kimball asked him if the ''far 
! right" has a greater appeal In 
the United States than commu- 
nism. 

Goldmark said it does In the 3 
political sphere. Communists are | 
clearly Identified as enemies, he I 
said. 

"The 'far right,* on the other 
hand, can take advantage of the 
great concern that people In 
America feel about the threat of 
communism In the rest of the 
world," and thus exploit "these 
peop!e*s good intentions,** Gold- 
mark said. 

Kimball asked Goldmark If 
the "far right** is more danger* 
ous than communism. 

Danger Seen 
"As a political force, yes . • .,** 
Goldmark replied. **In the *30s 
I you. could get people to go into 
I the Communist party because 
I they were really sincerely con- 
I cerned about taking care of or- 
1 dinary people's problems and 
■ I they thought this was the way 
1 to help." 

lj The Communist party no long- 
jer attracts people that way be- 
■ cause communism Is identified 
las an^ exxemy^ Goldmark said. 






Ion, is in dispute, but the big 
tumbling block is a provision 
ffecting the proposed grain sale 
o Russia. 

This provision, written in 
by the House but rejected 
by the Senate on President 
Lyndon B. Johnson's recom- 
mendation, would bar the ex- 
port-import bank from guar* 
anteeing credit on sales to 
Communist countries. 

Confer eesr representing the 
FJ two bodies had been at work 
| less than an hour when McCor- 
mack made his prediction. 

He confirmed that congres- 
sional leaders had met with 
Johnson today but refused to 
say what had been discussed, 
except to say "several matters" 
came up. * 

Nor would McCormack say 
whether, if no agreement is 
reached on foreign aid by to- 
morrow, Congress will adjourn 
anyhow and let the aid question 
go over until January. 

"If we can dispose of foreign 
aid, we can wind it up/* he 
said. 

The foreign aid conferees met 
f*t 11^15 a.m^ Sen. John O. Pas- 
ore, I5-R.I., heading the Senate 
^roup, said before the session 



ti 



I 



The Senate approved deletion 
;of the commodity sale ban aft- 
er Senate Democratic Leader 
Mike Mansfield read a letter 
from President JoHnson urging 
that course. 

Johnson said sale of wheat 
and other .commodities to Com- 
munist nations on reasonable 
terms are "good for our "farm- 
ers and exporters, good for our 
shipping and railroads industry, 
good for our balance of pay- 
ments, and good for the coun- 
try. 



No Big Thaw 
Seen; Cooler 
Readings Due 

Spokane's heavy snow cover 
lightened a "bit today as warm- 
er, moist air from the Coast 
surged through th^ region in the 
early^ morning hours. 

hat -«Wo "shouTtf Vettte tfate Mlt Itio^apo^a^d^Hlfii^ "5?^ 
>e_fore weadjourn." il^^SSSsfigSTiS'eK^St 

j gist said. In the wake ojf $he dis~ 



He said Congress would be 
'very ill-advised" to let the 
measure go over to January 
lecause of the uncertainties 
'his would leave in the foreign 
aid program for the year al- 
ready half gone. 

The conferees ended -their first 
session — without .agreement — 
just about the -time McCormack 
gave his assessment of the out- 
look. 

P* a store told reporters they 
iad not tackled the grain sale 
provision, which he called" the 
leart of the issue. 

The- representatives of the two 

E ranches- agreed to meet again 
1 1 p.m. EST. 

The issue was- sharply drawn 
Thursday night, when the Senate 
massed the aid bill 60 to"25 after 
leleting, 52 to 32, a House 
intendment to prohibit the Ex- 
>ort-Xmport Sank from guarant- 
eeing credit" for trade with 
Communist countries. 
The House adopted the - 
mendment by a vote of 218-69 fy 

Lancer Battle 
gSets-Assls t— 



Rememb 





'FIRST WE WILL TAKE 



EASTERN EUROPE, THEN 



THE MASSES OF ASIA, THEN 



WE WILL ENCIRCLE THE 



UNITED STATES, 



WHICH WILL BE THE 



LAST B.AS.TIOT 'OX 



CAPITALISM, 



WE WILL NOT HAVE 



TO ATTACK. 



IT WILL FALL 



LIKE AN OVERRIPE FRUIT 



INTO OUR HANDS." 

- Lenin, 1923 




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K ELLOGG. IDAHO 



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fibres niws efc WH IttJOYM 

HtjicTottJ fr~ft<<J\4\J ^'4 h*K 
Am-COMMWl$T kstk ' vtr r s *t 

ACTION^ "^ ^ u$tH *n i°(h* wty $o 



To Whom It May Concern: 

I have known T I of Kellogg, Idaho, for 

approximately fifteen years. During all of this time he has 
*bee f n a determined and effective opponent of the Communist 
conspiracy as it has operated in the important mining area 



of northern Idaho. His knowledge of the inner workings of 
the Communist apparatus has grown with experience and con- 
flict, until today I consider him a competent authority not 
only on the local level, but on the national and international, 
as well. 



Mr. 



]the Shoshone 



County An ti- Communist Association and he is primarily re- 
sponsible for it becoming the effective hard-hitting organ- 
ization that it is today. Because of his knowledge and. wide b6 
experience he was called to testify before the United States b7c 
Senate Internal Security Sub- Committee in 1954 as an expert 
witness on the extent of Comrr\unist penetration in Northern 
Idaho. 

Because of both his zeal and his knowledge in this field 
he is much sought after as a speaker and consultant on Com- 
munism. He has addressed patriotic groups of nearly every 
description. These groups include the State of Idaho Auto 
Dealers convention, the Idaho Grand Lodge Convention of the 
Knights of Pythias, the State meeting of Catholic Study Clubs, 
the International Business Fraternity, as well as labor Union 
Locals and numerous Service clubs. 4 

Most important of all, Mr. | | has recently been 

responsible for the organization of a large number of anti- 
Communist study groups in Idaho. After his address today 
I am certain that he will be most happy to discuss an effect- 
ive program with anyone who wishes to form or join such 
a group. 




i 
Sincerely, 




A. F. Canwell <-~nz 

Research Director 
Freedom Library 
Spokane, Washington 



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January 13, 1964 



A^ 



Mr, 
"HF£oute~Z7 



- »* 



Box 409 






Jbeesburg, Georgia 



Dear Mr. 



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Your letter of January 6th was received during 
Mr» Hoover's absence from the city. ' You may be certain it will 
be brought to his attention when he, returns and I know Mr. Hoover 
would want me to express his appreciation for your interest in 
"Masters of Deceit, " 



V 2C 



ej 



Tolson , 
Belmont , 
Mohr 



Casper * 
Callahan^ 
Conrad ^J 
DeLoach «. 
Evans _ 
Gale _ 
Rosen ■— — 
Sullivan 
Tavel 



Enclosed is some literature distributed by the FBI 
which contains suggestions loyal Americans can use in opposing 
the communist menace. Perhaps you will also want to read 
Mr. Hoover's latest book, "A Study of Communism, M which traces 
the history of communism since its inception and contrasts tliis 
evil philosophy with our heritage of freedom. Copies may be 
available at your local library. 



"RAILED id 

JAN 13 1964 

COMM-FBL 



Sincerely yours, 



Helen W. Gandy 
Secretary 



Enclosures (5) Ls~s? 

Communism and The Knowledge To Combat It! 

Time of Testing 

What You Can Do To Fight Communism 

Statement on Communism 

The Communist Party Line ^ 





f 

NOTE: Correspondent cannot be identified in Bufiles. Ah iri-absence Sejant 

MAIL.ROOM LJ TELETYPE UNIT L_ J 

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d 



TRUE COPY 



Jan, 6, 1964 



Mr. J. Edgar Hoover 
F. B. I. 
Washington^ D. C. 

Dear Mr. Hoover: 

j I have just finished reading your book " Masters, 

J of Deceit" which I am very glad that I read even though it is 
frightening to know how the Communist are gradually taking 
over. It seems that we here in this United States don't care 
or don f t try to find out about these things and be aware of such 
acts of treason. 

Mr. Hoover, you stated in your book that it is 
hard to tell a communist. Then why does the Justice Department 
not make public the names of known Communists and their "fellow 
travelers"? Why is Martin Luther King and Ray Wilkins allowed 
to stir up trouble? Why can't they be exposed for what they are, 
selfish characters who want to stir up a nation for their own 
benefit? After reading your book, it is my opinion that they 
are either Communists or "fellow travelers." 

I would appreciate any information you could send 
me that would be beneficial in the fight against Communism. 

Sincerely, 

i°i i i 




r/ 



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fi I /T Rt. 2 Box 409 iOQ y MCF 

\ 6 q ^ <—* CUM 

q, ^ d/r <y ,g JAN 14 1964 




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Tolson 

Belmont - 

Mohr _ 

Casper — . 
*- - Callahan . 
Conrad _ 
De Loach -i 
Evans —. 
Gale ._. 
Rosen — , 
Sullivan - 
Tavel 
Trottl 



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Mr. 



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Post OffieeJ^xJL3& 
^Pelofas, R. G; doSul, Brazil* 



Dear Mr. 




January9, 1964 
AIRMAIL 



C- 



Your letter of December 26th has been received 
and it was certainly good of you to write, such favorable com- 
ments concerning my book, "Masters of Deceit. n 

I appreciate your kind remarks regarding 7 my 
s& administration of. the FBI and my associates and I trust our 
5- fufeare^endeavors will continue to merit your support and 
^ confidence. 



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— est 



Sincerely yours, 
J. Edgar Hoovct 



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-f£? Rio de Janeiro -Enclosure 

1 - Foreign Liaison Unit - Enclosure 

NOTE: C orrespondent is. not identifiable in Buttles. | 

I "* | is/aescribed in correspondence. Consequently,, it 






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deferred to in Bufile 100-344-145-6. 



could not be determined if he is identical with this individual o 



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P a 3«y)(|^F |, .y^5iL , l.« 






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JAN9-1964 

COMM-FBI , 



TeleWoo: 

Holmes 

Gandy>i 



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TELETYPE UNIT 



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SUMMARY FROM PORTUGUESE 



Letter to the Director from: 




Post Office Box 338 

Pelotas, R. G. do , Sul, Brazil. 



i- 

Mr. Tz u?r_ 
Tele. Jfcam 

Mis3 LlX;i;s. 
Miss Gar* 




l 



/' This letter Lsrdated December 26,; 1963.. The writer has just 
\ completed a readmg-p ^Masters of Deceit ? " the Director's book he bought 
• on a friend's recommendation. \ He is impressed with the insight the work 
afforded him into the methods of .international, communism. "Believe me, 
Mr. {Hoover, "'heisays, i -"this i work is worthy of being read by all 16yers/0ft 
democracy and by the nonlqyefs'as well? -Moreover!^ it ought to be-fcyrfa^-* 
for thought for all rulers of the world. >* - ' " ' 



In Brazil^ Mr; 



is- the, exponent Of anti- 



\ 

(communism. This man?s name is noted for the Director to know who 
his friends are in Latin America. 

■ The writer closes with best wishes for a successful contiml 
of 4he struggle the Director is waging to preserve freedom and demo 
in : the world. 






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Pelotas, Dezembro 






1963 



Sr. 

J* Edgar Hoover 

Washington, DC 

Estados Unidos da America 



Prezado Senhorr 



Cbmprei-o por 



Acabo de ler o seu livro " MESTRES DO EMBUSTE " 

recomendagao de urn amigo. 

Creia, Sr. Hoover - e uma obra digna de ser lida por todos os 

democratas e nao democratas, e mais digna ainda, de ser meditada 

pelos. governances mundiais. 

As advertgncias contidas em « MESTRES DO EMBUSTE " adapt am-4'e- #1§S 
namente &• nossa 6poca, pois nada mais nocivo que o comuni smoke's fr&y 
pondo em perigo a democracia no mundo. A America Latina, pYe^entP 
mente,vive talvez o maisjiegro perfodo de sua hist6ria. E^6l%ida& 
espetacularmente pela a$ao nefasta dos agentes do* Kremlin, pende 
em setenta por cento para o nacionalismo xen6fobo e revoluciond- 
rio, para o oportunismo pactuante com- o comunismo, para o completo 
odio aos Estados Unidos. Em tgdas as partes, do Mexico ao Uruguai 
o comunismo est£ prestes a triunfar. De urn momento para outro pode 
a America Latina ser pisada pela bota vermelha. A ingrcia dos gov&i 
nos das republicas do sul(parecem mergulhados no completo descaso) r 
talvez comprometa totalmente a democracia na America Latina num ^ 
futuro muito pr6ximo. 

As considera?oes sObre o comunismo e seus efeitos contidas em MES- 
TRES DO EMBUSTE servem de exemplo k qualquer pals democrata e deven 
ser tomadas a s6r io. No Brasil. a tualmente, lider mdximo do anti- 
comunismo 6 o S r . | | . -Tem-6-le- 1-utado de peito aberto * 

contra a influ e ncia ae moscou em nossa terra. Em parte a sua luta .>' 
permanece no ostracismo, face ao analfabetismo e a mis&ria explorar 
dos pelo comunismo, Mas os verdadeiros e genuinos democratas sabem* 
de que lado est& a verdade e reconhecem os inimigos da liberdade. 
seu livro, Sr* Hoover, vem nos prestar alguns esclarecimentos in- 
dispensaveis a causa da paz e dos direitos humanos. 

Envio-lhe os meus mais fraternos votos de democrat^ pela feliz ini- 
ciativa que tomou por dar^ao mundo esta obra de liberdade. Sua lut£ 
Sr. Hoover, 6 a nossa luta. Seu ideal 6 o mesmo dos verdadeiro'^^T ; 
patriotas que v6em no comunismo. o monstro destruidor de cohscigncit 
e liberdades. r-V«i 

Queira aceitar o meu cordial abrago de democrata. 



b7C 



*S§' 




Seu muito atento, 




Caixa Postal, 338 7" 
Pelotas - R.G. do Sul 
Brasil •